George Washington Papers

To George Washington from John Beckley, 12 February 1790

From John Beckley

12th feby 1790.

Sir,

The subject of supplying certified copies of the Acts of Congress in the mode prescribed by a Resolution of the last Session,1 has been mentioned to the House by the Speaker at my request, but no Order taken therein: I therefore do not consider myself authorized to furnish the Copies of the Act you require in that mode: but if the requisite number of printed copies, as the same are published, will suffice, they will be delivered to you on application to Messrs Childs and Swaine.2 I am, Sir, Your most Obedient servant,

John Beckley.

LS, DNA: RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters.

1In June 1789 the House had resolved that within ten days after the passage of each act of Congress, “twenty-two printed copies thereof, signed by the Secretary of the Senate, and Clerk of the House of Representatives, and certified by them to be true copies of the original acts, be lodged with the President of the United States; and that he be requested to cause to be transmitted, two of the said copies, so attested as aforesaid, to each of the Supreme Executives in the several States” (DHFC, description begins Linda Grant De Pauw et al., eds. Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America, March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791. 20 vols. to date. Baltimore, 1972—. description ends 3:82).

2Francis Childs and John Swaine were the publishers of the New York Daily Advertiser. In May 1789 Childs and Swaine were chosen by Beckley and Samuel A. Otis, secretary of the Senate, to print the laws of Congress (DHFC, description begins Linda Grant De Pauw et al., eds. Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America, March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791. 20 vols. to date. Baltimore, 1972—. description ends 3:75–76).

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