George Washington Papers

Cash Accounts, July 1759

Cash Accounts

[July 1759]

Cash
July 5— To ditto [cash] of Ditto [Col. Custis’s estate] £  3. 7. 6
10— To ditto of Ditto 15. 0. 0
To ditto Recd of Mr Rt Jackson1 for 4 Hhds Tobo 76. 4. 2
To Ditto of the Estate 4. 1. 3
To Ditto of Ditto 8.10. 0
To Ditto of Thos Mobbs in part for Rent2 2.10. 0
To Ditto of the Estate 311.18. 4
To Ditto Recd of Mr Alexr for the use of my Stal[lion]3 1. 1. 6
To Ditto of Mr Brasenton4 Do 0.10. 9
To Ditto of Jno. Alton—got by my Stallion 2.10. 0
Contra
July 3d— By pd James Danforth [,] Smith5 2. 5. 0
By Do pd Mrs Vaughan 16/. pd Do for P. Custis 13/6 1. 9. 0
By George Heaths Acct—in full7 1.11. 0
 
By Mrs Washington 1.11. 3
By Mr Chamberlaynes Will8 1. 0. 0
By Thomas Bishop 0.10. 0
By Exps. on the Road to Fairfax 3. 5. 6
By 6 ⟨Stape⟩ Stocks 0. 5. 0
By my Mother9 15. 0. 0
10— By pd my Acct with Mr Jackson10 69. 6.11 1/2
By Cash pd Jno. Winter’s—Painter11 5. 0. 0
By Do pd Wm Lewis12—for Oystershells in full 4. 1. 3
30— By Richard Stephens—to discharge him from Prison Bounds at suit of Mr Kirkpatrick13 21. 0. 0
By Exps. to Nangemy14 1. 0. 0

AD, Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 56, 58.

1Robert Jackson was a Fredericksburg merchant.

2In his account with Thomas Mobbs GW in January 1761 records a loss of 13s. 6d. “pr Smiths Book” (Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 117).

3“Mr Alexr” is probably Robert Alexander (d. 1793), son of Col. Garrard (Gerard) Alexander of Alexandria.

4GW in the early 1760s made payments to Samuel Brasenton (Brazington) and his wife for dressing skins, making leather pants, knitting boys’ stockings, and for her acting as a midwife for “a Negroe Wench” (ibid., 81, 158).

5Daniel Parke Custis frequently employed James Danforth as a blacksmith.

6Elizabeth Vaughan was a seamstress who made at least one gown for Martha Washington before her marriage.

7George Heath, who was perhaps the same George Heath who owned land in New Kent County in 1787, was at this time a tailor. Martha Custis often employed him to make clothes for her son and servants.

8This was probably Richard Chamberlayne of Poplar Grove, New Kent County, but it may have been his brother Edward Pye Chamberlayne. Both men had business dealings with Daniel Parke Custis before his death and with Martha Custis before her marriage to GW.

9Although GW’s account with Mary Washington in Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends shows no cash transaction with his mother between May 1757 and October 1764, this is only one of a very large number of such entries in his cash accounts.

10See note 1.

11GW wrote at the end of John Winter’s personal account in Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 54, “Jno. Winter before he had near finishd Painting my House Stole a good deal of my Paint & Oyl and apprehensive of Justice ran of.” John Fendall ran an advertisement dated 22 June 1760 in the Maryland Gazette: “Ran away from the Subscriber, a Convict Servant Man named John Winter, a very compleat House Painter; he can imitate Marble or mahogany very exactly, and can paint Floor Cloths as neat as any imported from Britain, The Time of his going off is uncertain, as he was hired to a Gentleman in Virginia who can give no Account of the Time. The last Work he did was a House for Col. Washington near Alexandria. He must be pretty well known there, having work’d at his Business several Months in Town. He is a very impertinent Fellow, pretty tall, and very red about the Nose and Face” (Maryland Gazette [Annapolis], 26 June 1760).

12William Lewis was probably the son of Thomas Lewis (died c.1771), the nephew and legatee of the Thomas Lewis who until his death in 1749 lived on Charles Washington’s land on the Potomac River near Mount Vernon. Thomas’s widow Sarah Lewis still lived there.

13GW records having lent £21 to his overseer Richard Stephens (Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 53). For the identity of Kirkpatrick, see John Kirkpatrick to GW, 23 Aug. 1758. The justices of each county were required by law “to mark and lay out the bounds and rules of their respective county prisons, not exceeding ten acres.” Under the law all prisoners except traitors and felons could, after giving good security, be permitted to walk about for their health (5 Hening description begins William Waller Hening, ed. The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the Laws of Virginia, from the First Session of the Legislature, in the Year 1619. 13 vols. 1819–23. Reprint. Charlottesville, Va., 1969. description ends 508).

14Nanjemoy was a village in Charles County, Maryland.

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