George Washington Papers

To George Washington from Humphrey Knight, 23 August 1758

From Humphrey Knight

Mount Vernon Augst the 23d 1758

Sir

Yesterday we had a very fine rain which has wet things to the Roots. Ellse we have had None before this Sumer, to Do Corn mutch Servis We have a very likely Cornfeild I beleive the best In the parts, As to Tobco we have a good Deal mising but it is the worst of the ground I hope to make a smart Crop of Tobco if weather premits, I should be Glad to no what Quantanty of wheat you would have Sewd, Our people has bin very Sickley ned and Ruth is Sick now, & betty but I hope no Dainger Our Stock is all well. I have taken Some people out of The Crop and put to work on the New meadow which we be gun last Fall, and Shall get it dun as fast as I Can not hurting the Crop the mill has not gone this 4 or 5 weeks past, Willm Gates and Nathon Williamson two of your Tenants has Given notice that theyr Going of, As to the rest they Seem to wont to Stay If your Hnr thinks proper they Should I have Got all the rents in as I shall get this year, Ben Williamson Will Nation Wm Gates Neither of them has paid all their rents, John Crook has paid none, the widow [Elizabeth] Ransom Did not pay Quite all hers, plese to send word if any of the Tenants is to be movd that wonts to stay or if the places that is void must be rented again because Severall Sponsable people is after them1 I am Sir Your Most Hble Servt to Comd

Humphry Knight

The place of Nathon Williamsons is on that track of Land you bought of Mr Dorrell lies over the road against the Orchard where the widow Ransom lives.

H. K.

ALS, DLC:GW.

1In 1758 GW’s Mount Vernon estate consisted of the original Mount Vernon tract on Little Hunting Creek (2,162 acres) and the Mill tract on Dogue Run (172 acres) as well as the Darrell tract of 500 acres on the northwest boundary of the Mount Vernon tract, bought from Sampson Darrell in December 1757. See the map in Diaries description begins Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds. The Diaries of George Washington. 6 vols. Charlottesville, Va., 1976–79. description ends , 1:240–42, entitled “The Growth of Mount Vernon, 1754–86.” Of the five tenants that Knight names here only John Crook is among the nine listed in Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends as still paying rent in 1761. Crook, who began renting a farm in the original Mount Vernon tract in 1755, continued as GW’s tenant until 1767. Benjamin Williamson rented a farm on Little Hunting Creek near the mansion from 1756 until 1760 when GW put what came to be called Creek Plantation in the hands of an overseer (Diaries description begins Donald Jackson and Dorothy Twohig, eds. The Diaries of George Washington. 6 vols. Charlottesville, Va., 1976–79. description ends , 1:229). Elizabeth Ransom discontinued renting one of GW’s farms in 1760, after having rented it for three years. GW’s account with William Nations (Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 69), who died in February 1760, shows that Nations gave 1,000 pounds of tobacco as rent for his farm every year from 1755 through 1759. The account with William Gates only shows his account with GW’s blacksmith for the years 1760 and 1761, and no account with Nathan Williamson has been found in Ledger A description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends .

Index Entries