George Washington Papers

[Diary entry: 1 April 1790]

Thursday the First. Received from a Comee. of both Houses of Congress the following Acts. viz—“An Act to accept a Cession of the Claims of the State of No. Carolina to a certain District of Western Territory” and an “Act to prevent the exportation of Goods not duly inspected according to the Laws of the several States.”

Communicated to both Houses of Congress a letter from the Govr. of So. Carolina, enclosing the adoption of the amendments by that State agreeably to the recommendation of Congress.

The following Company dined here to day. viz.

Governor Clinton, the Speakers of the Senate & House of Representatives of the State of New York Judge Duane, Baron de Steuben and Mr. Arthur Lee—Mr. King of the Senate, and the following Members of the House of Representatives—Mr. Leonard, Mr. Sedgwick, Mr. Grout, Mr. Van Rensalaer, Mr. Hathorn, Mr. Clymer, Mr. Heister, Mr. Stone, Mr. Williamson, Mr. Ash, and Mr. Huger.

acts: 1 STAT. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 106–9 (2 April 1790); 1 STAT. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 106 (2 April 1790). letter from the govr.: Charles Pinckney to GW, 28 Jan. 1790, enclosed a resolution of the South Carolina legislature, 18 Jan. (DNA: RG 233, Journals, 1st Congress). GW sent the documents to the House 1 April (DE PAUW description begins Linda Grant De Pauw et al., eds. Documentary History of the First Federal Congress of the United States of America, March 4, 1789-March 3, 1791. 20 vols. to date. Baltimore, 1972—. description ends , 3:253).

The speaker of the New York Senate was Isaac Roosevelt. Gulian Verplanck was speaker of the legislature.

Arthur Lee was living at this time on his estate, Lansdowne, in Middlesex County, Va., and at Alexandria. He may have come to New York to see his brother Richard Henry Lee, now a member of Congress, who had been “brought near to my grave by a severe illness” (Richard Henry Lee to Arthur Lee, 19 May 1790, ViU: Lee Family Papers; BALLAGH description begins James Curtis Ballagh, ed. The Letters of Richard Henry Lee. 2 vols. New York, 1911-14. description ends , 2:510).

Jeremiah Van Rensselaer (1738–1810), representative to the First Congress from New York, graduated from Princeton in 1758 and served in the New York Assembly in 1789.

John Hathorn (1749–1825), a Federalist who also represented New York in the House of Representatives, served in the New York militia during the Revolution, in the New York Assembly in 1778–80, 1782–85, 1795, 1805, and in the New York Senate 1786–90, 1799–1803.

John Baptista Ashe (1748–1802) was born in Rocky Point, N.C. Ashe served as a colonel in the North Carolina militia during the Revolution and in the North Carolina House of Commons 1784–86. In 1787 he was a member of the Continental Congress and in 1789 was elected as a Federalist to the First Congress.

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