George Washington Papers

[Diary entry: 6 November 1769]

6. Came to Williamsburg. Dind at Mr. Carters with Lord Botetout Govr. Eden &ca. and suppd at Mrs. Vobes with Colo. Fitzhugh.

Mrs. Washington and Patsy remained at Eltham today, while Jacky accompanied GW to town, where they lodged at Mrs. Campbell’s place (ledger a description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 296, 299).

Sir Robert Eden (1741–1784), proprietary governor of Maryland 1769–76, was, according to his later friend Jonathan Boucher, “a handsome, lively, and sensible man. . . . He had been in the Army, and had contracted such habits of expense and dissipation as were fatal to his fortunes, and at length to life. Yet with all his follies and foibles, which were indeed abundant, he had such a warmth and affectionateness of heart, that it was impossible not to love him” (boucher [1] description begins Jonathan Bouchier, ed. Reminiscences of an American Loyalist, 1738–1789: Being the Autobiography of The Revd Jonathan Boucher, Rector of Annapolis in Maryland and afterwards Vicar of Epsom, Surrey, England. Boston, 1925. description ends , 67). Eden’s military experience included service with the Coldstream Guards in Germany during the Seven Years’ War. In 1765 he had married Caroline Calvert, sister of the current proprietor of Maryland, Frederick Calvert, sixth Baron Baltimore (1732–1771), from whom Eden had received his appointment as governor.

Jane Vobe (died c.1789) operated a well-furnished tavern on Waller Street near the theater, and according to a traveler who had stopped there four years earlier, it was a place “where all the best people resorted” (french traveller description begins “Journal of a French Traveller in the Colonies, 1765, I.” American Historical Review 26 (1920–21): 726–47. description ends , 741). Mrs. Vobe was in business as early as May 1757, when GW first patronized her tavern, and she remained at this location until 1771 (ledger a description begins Manuscript Ledger Book 1, 1750-72, in George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. description ends , 35).

Col. Fitzhugh is probably Henry Fitzhugh (1723–1783) of Stafford County. He was the son of Henry Fitzhugh of Bedford and married Sarah Battaile, daughter of Capt. Nicholas Battaile, in 1746. Fitzhugh was a colonel in the Stafford County militia and furnished supplies to the American army during the Revolution.

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