James Madison Papers

To James Madison from George Joy, 6 November 1811

From George Joy

London 6th Novr: 1811

Dear sir,

The above is, I believe, the 5th Copy of my Letter of the 15th Aug.1 I doubt if more than one is yet 10 Degrees westward. For 46 Days there have not been more than 6 Hours of easterly Wind and I have lately heard of a ship being still at Tonningen by which I wrote you before I left Copenhagen; and am now advised of the foundering of the John Atkinson from Gottenburg for Philada. Crew saved.

This being the regular Mail Day; I hand you herewith a Paragraph from the Courier2 of which I shall send Duplicates per other routes, for the Chance of early arrival, to the secretary of state. Always very respectfully, Dear sir, Your friend & servt:

Geo: Joy.

RC and enclosures (DLC: Rives Collection, Madison Papers). RC written at the foot of the enclosures. In addition to the extract described in n. 2, Joy enclosed copies of his letters to JM of 15 Aug. 1811 (see n. 1) and 18 Oct. 1811, with a copy of the enclosure to the latter, Joy to Joel Barlow, 15 Sept. 1811 (see PJM-PS description begins Robert A. Rutland et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison: Presidential Series (4 vols. to date; Charlottesville, Va., 1984–). description ends , 3:490–91 and n.).

1See PJM-PS description begins Robert A. Rutland et al., eds., The Papers of James Madison: Presidential Series (4 vols. to date; Charlottesville, Va., 1984–). description ends , 3:417–18.

2Joy copied an extract from the London Courier of 4 Nov. 1811 which reported on an application made to the Board of Trade to allow American vessels to enter certain ports in Nova Scotia in order to permit them to take on cargoes of British goods and import them into the U.S. in violation of JM’s nonintercourse policy. After deliberating for two months on the matter, the Board of Trade had decided to grant the application and had instructed British colonial governors to allow British manufactures and West Indian produce to be exported from the ports in question into the U.S. The colonial governors were also authorized to admit any American vessels carrying “wheat and grain of every description, bread, biscuit, and flour, pitch, tar, and turpentine; the produce of the United States.” The extract concluded with the announcement that the Board of Trade intended to seek an extension of the 1809 statute authorizing its decisions after the statute expired on 25 Mar. 1812.

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