Alexander Hamilton Papers
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Candidates for Army Appointments from Maryland, [November–December 1798]

Candidates for Army Appointments
from Maryland1

[Philadelphia, November–December, 1798]

lt Colonels Maryland
John Carlisle
Hartford County
In Revolutionary Army 7 years
Asks for Adjutant General
vain letter
J C Hall
2 recommends
Joseph Forman
see below
honor & courage
Howard3
Hindman4
Loyed5
Lt Colonels
Levin Handy
Worster County
Old Officer
Captain
Samuel Smith says he was an excellent Officer [An Indolent man with no vigour of mind.]6
would expect a Majority at least
Secy says he is Antifœderal
His own Letter expects a Brigade
David Hopkins
Anne Arundel
Capt Cavalry Revolutionary War—between 40 & 50
Sober man was a good Officer of Cavalry [And would be a good major of Cavalry]7
active
John Adlum
General of Militia
officer in beginning of Revolutionary War
strict honor & integrity
firm mind
large property
R Peters8
Respectable
William D Beale *
on Potomack
G Town
Capt in Revol Army
Stoddert speaks
 strongly
calls him a hero.
* He was esteemed a good officer It would seem probable that he would take a Majority
S. Smith says he was one of the best Officers in the Maryland line Confirmed by Mr. Stoddert9
Ross10 says he was a steady foederalist—& respectable Officer Respectable
Circumstances low
Captains
2 John Thompson
Queen Anne
E Shore
Seeney11—is Capt of Militia young married man stout and resolute man of property respectable as Lt which he will accept
Matthews12—friend of Govermt well deserves the appt.
Waters13
Clayton—14
Hindman—well recommended to him
George Findey15 would be glad to see him assign
3 James McKinsey by capt Bowen16 conveyed by Howard
 
If he procures &c
5 Ezekiel Towson17 Baltimore County captaincy or Lieutenancy
By Hugh McCurdy his Partner
Secy doubts his principles
6 Nathan N Wright
George Town
Cross Roads
Eastern Shore
Appt. in provisional Army
Tolerable Letter Wont do
Probably not of good politics  Matthews
7 John Nicholson Secretary thinks he drinks
Antifoederal & suspected of drinking do
9 Hugh Matthews
irritable Temper
studied law lively
 young Man
clayton speaks well of him as Major or Captain of Artillery Pretty respectable
His letter is well—delicate health
Howard
Loyed
Hindman
} only speak of him as a man of honor
will make a good and active officer
Jonathan Hodgson
Chester Maryland
Kent County
Bayard18 } application for a Company of Artillery
S
Clayton*19 speaks well of him will accept a Lieutenancy
Matthews respected & esteemed by his acquaintances good education & appearance respectable
*allied to G Clayton
Basset20—worthy of the appointment
Merril Loyed—not much acquainted with him appears intelligent & candid
[if he is of Chas. County, he ought not to be appointed.]21
Rezin Davidge
Anne Arundel
Young man
Young Gentleman
DeWall22 (Ant.) speaks well of him
Winchester23 speaks well of character who recommends him
Davidson24 thinks the appt. will be well bestowed Respectable
R Ridgly25 of family & reputation
Gassaway26—uprightness & attachment to Government
[If Roger Nelson27 of Fredk. he is a detd. Enemy to Government.]29 Neilson28 brave active & alert
John R Bryce
Anne Arundel
Young man
respectable family
Letter verbose Inquire
says he has studied Military Discipline
Matthews—thinks he may make a good subaltern
Joseph Parrot
Talbot County
Lawyer 24 years
Federalist, now
Howard—speaks well—intelligent Lieutenancy
perhaps Captain
Secy Handsome interesting well informed
Winchester } indefatigable in his pursuits
Hindman
Jacob Giles Smith
Hartford County
young Gentleman
Paca30   Gentleman of respectable family
S Hughes31 good family manly figure fair character Inquire
G Smith His own letter decent
Sinclair Lancaster
Boh
60 years old
Capt in Militia last war
Oldham32—strictly fœderal
Matthews
Super-annuated
Samuel Davis Tilghman33 Hindman & others say he is highly intitled to Ltancy
Matthews retracts his former recommendation wants energy is very young would take a Lieutenancy Inquire
Elisha Jarret
Hartford
Dorsey34 Young Gentleman of respectable family well as Lieutenant
Qr. doubtful politics honorable principles can raise Mathews good looking & dresses neatly
Secretary says he is a Gamester Montgomery35 (Ant) speaks favourable
John Coleman36 (respectable Clergyman) from several years assures his fœderal & respectability
William Miller
Cecil County
Major of Militia
Creswell37 Fœderalist Qr a Lieutenant expects a Majority
Col Coboden enterprise & exertion
 
P Thomas38 uniformly fœderal & he thinks fit for military service will accept a Captaincy
Jno Mifflin39 distinguished Disciplinarian good fœderal & military man
John Miller Military appearance can raise men
George Gale40 tall man & influence at elections
very Illiterate
William Savin
Cecil County
30 & 40
Matthews stout good man handsome, good understanding without liberal education uniform fœderalist respectably as Lt perhaps Captain
Thomas Porter
Cecil
20 & 30
Matthews—stout good man handsome—uniform—foederalist writes good hand has had command ⟨–⟩ Ensign
William Spencer
Kent C
30 years
Matthews well educated genteel manners & good character—served as Paymaster man of property very Respectable
Quare Major
Howard & Lloyed
William S Dallam
Abington
Lawyer
Major of Militia
requests a Troop of Horse Respectable
Chase41   respectable family—of a brave stock—writes pretty well
General Carlisle42 shining talents good education & amiable disposition
C Hall—respectable connections excellent officer
Howard probably a fœderalist
Henry C Neale
St Mary’s County
Dent43—Young Gentleman of honor & good connections is recomd by R Barnes44 Probably respectable
Inquire
S Smith } worthy to command a Company & likely to raise one
P: Ford45 to Lloyed Strict honor & integrity zealous in his Country’s Cause
Richard Earl
Talbot
25 or 26
Hindman well pretty well as Lieutenant will probably accept Ensigncy
will take a subalterns
Howard recommends him fully from information
P Benson46—(Anti)
Hammond47 sober moral character & well enough
Isaac Spencer
Kent County
Lloyd sensible & worthy strong respectable
M Mathews Young active & unblemished
Tew—of property esteemed in his neighbourhood
Ferguson—
James Brooks General Crabb48 perhaps
 
Edward A Howard
Baltimore
Rumsey49 } young vigourus of good family
Mathew S honor probity
good Ensign
A Hall50   person will recommend itself
William Knight
Bohemia Manor
Oldham—of good family & thinks he will do honor Probably
good Ensign
Js. Tilghman,51 superficially acquainted quite a young man on Inquiry finds him meritorious honor integrity & sobriety
Benjamin Burch
Federal City
Formerly in the service
W D Beale52 says he is a worthy of a company Not much
Writes ill [a pair of Columns at the most.]53
Benjamin Harrison
Anne Arundel
Lawyer young
Wilmer54 person education & deportt intitles him at least to Comp probably well enough as Lieutenant [of a Federal Family]55
Gassaway Gentleman of family & respectability politics not mentioned
Richard Cooke
Anne Arundel
His father56 recommends him who is a good fœderalist probably respectable
 
Davidson }
Thomas58
Johnson59
E Tilghman57—worthy good young man of generous principles Lieutenant
Desirous of being on horse
John Henry60amiable man
Wilmer—activity
James Stewart
Baltimore
Irish Tavern Keeper
Mc.Eldery61 } recommends him
Anti
George Brown62 speaks of him as an excellent Citizen Gambler suspicion not elegible Qr
Howard S } Col recommends him strongly
O Donnel63
Charles M Brotherson
Baltimore County
Capt in present army, if not obtainable provisional army
Howard mentions but nothing positive Tolerably well
Goodwin64 sense & considerable information
J Hamilton65 speaks strongly
 
Coulter66 general terms favourably
Yeiser67—favourably
Kilty68probably active & spirited officer good education property in business a young family in business
Jacob Norris
Hartford
Lt. at Close of War
now Col of Militia
Col Carlisle speaks strongly of him Inquire carefully
asks for Command general
Samuel A Harpur
Eastern shore
Levin Handy69—recommends him
Thomas Skinner Handy
Gerard Briscoe
Charles County
Dent young Gentleman of good character respectable qualifications could raise a Company of Natives Respectable
Inquire of Mr Harrison70
William Ogle
Frederick County
G Johnson } Believe he would make a good officer
Baylor
P Thomas
No detail
Not very strong
[The Son of a Rich & a good Man71—and a good Federalist.]72
John C Beatty
Washington County
son of C W Beatty
Baer73 favorably—has commanded volunteer Compy checked Insurgents
 
Benjamin Greene
Hartford
27 years old
G Gale recommends but not strong—integrity & fœderalist
Howard recommends because he can raise a Company
S Hughes } Gentleman of merit & friend to Governt
Lieutenant perhaps Captain
J Carlisle—zealous fœderalist
Matthews appearance tolerably good
P Thomas
James P. Heath Oldham respectable family honor & spirit attention
John Evans
Charles County
Troop of Horse
 Western army
Revolutionary army
non Commissioned
 Officer
Corporal in Pensy
 Rg
Asks for Captaincy
Hartly74 deserves Attntn
Irvine75—favorably
Craick76
Perhaps Ensign
John Miller
G Town Potowmack
respectable family
nothing else appears
[There was a Man of the name of Miller who lived in Geo Town: an ignorant & a violent Jacobin—I know of no Man of the name living there now.]77
James Harpur
Wooster County
last war a private
now Captain of Militia
G. Gunby78 thinks him qualified for a Captain country School Education perhaps Ensign
J Dennis79 S
Robert Bell
Hartford County
Qr. if Maryland
Joshua Lamb
Eastern Shore
Lloyed fœderal
Quaker Integrity
Nothing very positive
Patrick Sim
Bladinsburgh
Potowmack
Col of Militia
campaign of 76 as
 Captain
Captaincy or Cavalry a Jacobin
General S Sim80 at Close of 76 was made Lt Co but resigned on marrying niece of Bishop Carrol81 good looking man Temperate
willing to go into Infantry Inquire particulary of Stoddert
Walter B Coxe82—himself an old Officer } They speak
Benjamin Brooks83 himself Antifœd strongly
R Sprigg84 recommends good conduct & sobriety
Nathan Levy
George Town
 Potowm
U Forrest85—dilligence & honor got rid of his youthful lusts was attentive & industrious as Merchant & wound up with reputation activity & accuracy usefull in Qr. M Gen
smart lively fellow Confidence
Lieutenants
Jesse Knock
Kent
Father87 a zealous
 partisin
Boardly86 honest Citizen foederal active industrious Lieutenant or Ensign Qr. Qr.
Ensign
Matthews young stout & active
Byus Hindman is inclined to believe he would make a good Officer Qr. Qr.
Not Much
Stanly Byass
Kent
probably a private
 in Militia
His own letter—Coats88 his Militia Captain
John Black
21 years
His friends not active } Matthews
he has not taken a part
handsome & sprightly
Qr. Qr
Ensign
Matthews presumes he might be trusted
Samuel Robinson
George Town
 Potowmack
Lt of Artillery
U. Forrest speaks well
Inquire of Stoddert
[a young man I believe of property & courage & fit for a Lt.]89
George Bringle
Nathan Browner 22
Charles Cty
Dent. Plain education, active & intelligent would accept of an Ensigncy.
Thomas B Clements
Charles County 45
served in Revolutionary army as serjeant with & Credit
Key90
Smith
John G ⟨–⟩
} Gent of respectable family & conn
general reputation good
Qr. Qr. Qr
Ensign
Dominick T Blake has studied law asks for first Lieutenant of Cavalry Respectably as Lieutenant
Matthews Young Gentleman from Ireland good scholar—finished scholar connected with first families in the state Inquire his politics
J E Howard Samuel Tew
John Henry amiable sensible worthy
Jacob Fowle
Stephen H Fowle
willing to devote their lives
Philemon C Blake
Queen Anne C
22 years
R Tilghman   Sobriety probity Respectably for Cornet or Ensign
J Tilghman   integrity honor
  their relative
Secy modest looking Genteel man Qr his politics
Lloyed no doubt he will make an excellent officer
Samuel Lane*
George Town
 Potowmack
U Forrest has commanded a Militia Comp }
recommends him strongly for Lieutency
J: T: Mason92 active intelligent young man
Anti mild
General Crabb
(Anti)
Stoddert recommends as Lt. strongly
Inquire of Chs.
Lee Atty G
[His Father91 a man of property & himself a clever young man]93
B Edwards94—his uncle acknowleges that he was Democratic good education
 
Richard W West
Prince George
P. Thomas cavalry in preference firm fœderalist & respectable young Gentleman respectably as Lieutenant
J E Howard
Jarrett Bull
Baltimore
promises ability & Patriotism writes a good han Passably an Ensign
James Carroll95 decent Genteel Young Man hopes he will do well
And Aitkin96 perhaps Ant:
A Jarret97
Yeyser98
McEildere a stupid man of property
J Norris99 } Antifœderal
Wm. Clen100
Levy Hillary
Frederick County
Stoddert Young man of merit nephew of a man of confidence & character good scribe from knowlege of accounts. respectably as Ensign
perhaps Lt
Craick handsome genteel clever young man [very clever Fellow & fit for a Lt.]101
Baer Doct Thomas
William Swan
Talbot County East
Benson recommends but not good Swan
Well as Ensign
D Kerr102—integrity, he understands acctg.
R L Nichols103—speaks favourably
 
Goldsborough104 active attentive young man
Perry105 spirited active officer
Nicholas Vanzandt Yeates106 integrity & sobriety strong Lt
Ninnian Pinckney
Anne Arundel
General Davidson } favourably }
James Lloyed great merit
John P Wilmer Intrepedity
probably good Lieutenant
[active Fellow]107
Inquire
Samuel Tyler Jun*2 }
Bradley Beans*
John Warrenx2
   Barnsx3
U Forrest They will make excellent Lieutenants }
*Stoddert speaks well of him
*2 do recommends as Lieutenants
[These three ought by all means to be appointed. Beans is fit to be a Capt.]109
[Barns is no relation of Jno Barnes108 by Blood or Politics—& is an extray clever young man. Beans is older, Federal & sensible, as all his Family are—and Warren is the son of a very Rich man, of decided attachment to Government. Tyler, I fear, is not very Federal, tho I know nothing of him—& Judge from the name110 only.]111
Samuel Thomas 64
James B Brookes
Montgomery
 County
was on Western
 Expedition
General Crabb good family fair Character Nothing pointed
Stoddert—Young man of good property
 
Aquila Beale
George Town
 Potomack
Craick—of good family & character worthy a Lieutenancy Probably good Lieutenant
Thomas Orne
G Town
 Potowmack
Inquire of Messrs Stoddert & Lear112
George Lewis
Cecil County
Lt of Militia
Oldham Young and active friend to Govt. thinks he will make a good office
Howard retracts his recommendation Wont do
William Troth
Easton
Eastern Shore
Toldwell abilities integrity
Dorsey acquitted himself as Gentleman Inquire
Richard G Hardestty
George Town
 Potowmac
U Forest active sprightly likely to make good officer Inquire
John Kerns
Baltimore
speaks of the goodness of his finances Inquire
Wm. Smith113 } sober active & industrious
Antifoed
Qr.
Andrew H Voorhees
Queen Annes
Seney good education & abilities perhaps Ensign
Matthews—reported to be a spirited young man
Louis C Bayly
G Town P
No recommendation
[appointed to the Navy.]114
Thomas Gordon
Eastern Shore
Coates
William Monroe
born Anapolis
now residing
 Philadelphia
See Penyslvania pretty well recommended as Lt. or Ensign
Richard Tilghman
the 5th
Talbot County
Wilmer will give importance to his Commission very Respectable
Hindman—meritorious & active
Wm Cooke115 large property
Charles Clements
Charles County
sergeant under St
 Clair116
Dent—faby as Ensign Not much
[25—good common education—possesses considerable knowledge. Deserving of at least an Ensigncy. D.]117
John B Barnes
Charles County
[mentd. in another place—a very clever Fellow, ought to be in the Cavalry.]120
prefers Cavalry
U Forest—strong
Probably respectable
J Campbell118—genteel of good connections well educated
John C Jones119 talents attached to the Govt.
Dent—  Fitzgerald121—sobriety & active zeal
Daniel Hughes
Cecil County
26 years
S. Hughes good family Courage & great firmness Probably respectable
P Thomas Foederalism & talents
G Gale general good character
Carvel Hall—Young Gentleman of merit health & strength active business
Samuel Miles
Baltimore
prefers cavalry Not strong
Striker122 } Genteel young man
Antif:
Inquire
Howard—a young man of activity & well calculated for army
Hoffman123 } character fair for spirit & merit
Anti
Charles Gantt
Nottingham
Robert Bowie124   formerly Antifœderal speaks well Quaere Qr
Stoddert S
Benjamin Preston
Hartford
Major of Militia
Christie125 respectable family Whig
Matthews, once Sheriff of Hartford respectable man stout & active—adviseable to appoint him Not strong
Eneas Noland
Montgomery
 County
D. Lucket126
Baer—S
Passably an Ensign
H Carbury127 handsome genteel young man
Alexander Cooper
Washington Coun
Baer s young Gentleman of virtue & bravery Inquire
Francis W Thomas
 G Town
to avenge his father
No recommendation
Benjamin McCenny
 Anne Arundel
Harwood128 } Young man
well qualified
for Company
W Rive
No sufficient Evidence
Selman129   Young Gentleman of strict honor
Lance Nothing of politics
Montgomery
 County
Craick } powerful & respectable Connection property in lands western expedition as Ensign & promoted to Captain can raise men
deserves attention
[must be Lane—mentioned before]130
 
William Nicholson
Queens Anne
 County
Hindman—sensible spirited & active man fœderalist deserves attention
Lieutenants
Levi Ford Philip Thomas—much merit & fœderalism perhaps Ensign
Daniel C Heath Jun
Kent County
or Cecil
respectable family
19 or 20
cavalry
Oldham respectable!
Ramsay131—real acquisition to the army
Milligan132 spirit & honor fœderal
Levi Alexander
Baltimore County
27 years
Ramsay—mentioned to him by respectable Gentleman as qualified for an Officer Respectable
Winchester respectable Connections honor & integrity
Oldham—neither has nor will be better appointm
William Elliot
Washington
 County
24 years
son of R Elliot134
Williams133 Cavalry
foederal—sprightly active genteel—liberal education & abilities respectable
Solomon Yerving Most very honorable for
Read }
Amos Reed
Lloyed recommends as qualified in general terms perhaps Ensign
Farley perhaps
 Kent County
Thomas Dent
Charles Cty
G Dent recommends him as Ensign
 
Samuel Casson Wm. W Bond135 his family respectable has behaved well in a store perhaps Ensign
William Ashe
Baltimore
Drunkard
No recommendation
a Lawyer
Wont do
Francis Dillet
Eastern Shore
Recom by Hindman
John Griffith
Kent County
Horse or Navy
Loyed
Matthews highly recommended to him by respectable Men
James Mathers
Washington
 County
26 years
Res Inhabitants good moral character industry & integrity perhaps Ensign
E Williams S
Levi G Ford
Cecil County
Matthews good family respectably as Ensign
Oldham
Manners & attached to the Government
Thomas York Sprague Enquire of the Auditor.136
Samuel Davis
Kent County
studied law
Matthews genteel handsome young man—wavering in his politics but now seems decided Qr. Ensign
S Smith Michael Obrien137 by no means man of property not much
Subalterns
[Matthew Tighlman
21 years old
recommended by Genl: Lloyd — attached to the government—raised a Corps of Volunteers—perhaps Lieut. if not Ensign]138
Lloyd Beall
George Town
old officer Capt.
Stoddert says he ought to be a Captain
John Bush
old officer
J Gassaway
old captain
[no man of the name in Maryd. fit for a Field officer.]139
Council of Maryland
Fidelity & honor DuVal who is an Antifœderal
J Henry
Respectable
Philip Stewart
old Officer
Chas. County
Uriah Forest
property
fit for any command
Stoddert confirms
[Wishes to be in the Provisional Army & fit for a Regt. a warm Decided Federalist & active in keeping Jacobins in order.]140
Thomas Beatty Jun
Frederick County
Capt in former War
[He ought to be a
young Capt.]141
asks for such Commission as his former services may justify
Forest says he is brave & has good Understandg
Stoddert—ought not to be higher than Captain
James Hindman recommended by his brother
John C Hall formerly commanded Regt.
John Bush
old Captain
Talbot County
Drunkard
Joseph Foreman
Cecil County or
 Kent
asks command of
 a Regiment
Lloyed, a man of great honor & courage & will make a good Officer Respectable
Secretary says he is a man of property & Intelligence—⟨–⟩
Lt Colonels
[Josias] Carval Hall Hartford [Lt Colo.]
William D. Beale Prince George [1st Major]
[David Hopkins Ann Arundle 2d Major]
Majors
10 John C Beatty Alleghany
5 William Elliot Washington
10 Alexander Cooper Ensign
2 Thomas Beatty Jun Frederick
9 Edward A Howard Baltimore County
2 John Brangle Frederick
 
1 Loyed Beall Montgomery
4 Richard W West Prince George
3 Enos Noland Frederick
6 Gerard Briscoe Charles County
3 John B Barnes do.
4 Thomas Dent do.
9 Rozin Davidge Anne Arundel
2 Ninnean Pinckney do
5 Levi Hillary Frederick
7 Bradley Beans Prince George
8 Levi Alexander Baltimore
9 John Warren
4 Isaac Spencer Kent
7 Matthew Tilghman 5th do.
8 Samuel Davis do
8 William Nicholson Queen Anne
1 [Henry C. Neale St. Mary’s] do.
1 William Swan Talbot
5 Jacob Norris Hartford
6 Daniel C Heath Cecil
7 Levi G Ford do
3 William S Dallam Hartford
10 Aquila Beale Montgomery
6 Daniel Hughes Cecil

AD, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.

1In this list of recommendations for Army appointments, those recommended have not been identified. Wherever possible, however, the individuals making the recommendations have been identified.

H, George Washington, and Charles Cotesworth Pinckney prepared this list, which is undated, during their meetings in Philadelphia.

The material within brackets in this document is not in H’s handwriting.

2Josias Carvel Hall, a resident of Havre de Grace, Maryland, had been a colonel in the American Revolution. On December 31, 1798, he was appointed lieutenant colonel of the Ninth Regiment of Infantry (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 299, 303).

3John Eager Howard.

4William Hindman, a Federalist and a lawyer, had served in the Maryland Senate from 1777 to 1784. He was a member of the Continental Congress from 1784 to 1787 and the Governor’s Council from 1789 to 1792. He was a member of the Maryland Senate in 1792, when he was elected to the United States House of Representatives, in which he served until 1799.

5James Lloyd was a lawyer who served in the Maryland militia during the American Revolution. He was a Federalist member of the United States Senate from 1798 until his resignation in 1800.

6The material within brackets is in the handwriting of James McHenry.

7The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Benjamin Stoddert.

8Richard Peters.

9Benjamin Stoddert.

10James Ross.

11Joshua Seney, a lawyer, served in the Maryland House of Delegates from 1785 to 1787. He was a member of the Continental Congress from 1787 to 1788, and he was elected to the First Congress. He was reelected, but he resigned on May 1, 1792, to become chief justice of the Third Judicial District of Maryland, a position he held until 1796. Seney was an unsuccessful Republican candidate for Congress in 1798.

12William Matthews served as a judge of the Cecil County Court in 1778, 1780, and again from 1782 to 1786. He was a member of the Maryland General Assembly from 1788 to 1789 and a presidential elector in 1789. In 1796 he was elected to the Fifth Congress.

13James Waters was a Baltimore merchant.

14Joshua Clayton.

15George Finley, a resident of Queen Annes County, Maryland, was appointed a commissioner of valuations on July 16, 1798 (Executive Journal I, 288, 289).

16John Bowen commanded a troop of cavalry in the Baltimore militia during the Whiskey Insurrection.

17Ezekial Towson was a tavern owner and builder in Baltimore County. His partner in the building firm was named Mosher.

18James A. Bayard.

19Presumably this is a reference to James Clayton, son of Joshua Clayton.

20Richard Bassett.

21This sentence is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

22Gabriel Duval, a lawyer, was elected to the House of Representatives as a Republican to fill a vacancy and served from 1794 to 1796. He resigned in 1796 to become an associate justice of the Maryland Supreme Court. He was a presidential elector in 1796 and 1800.

23William Winchester was justice of the peace in Frederick County, Maryland, from 1778 to 1780 and again in 1783. During the American Revolution he served as a captain in the militia. From 1794 to 1795 he represented Baltimore in the House of Delegates. In 1798 Winchester ran as the Federalist candidate for Congress, but he was defeated by Samuel Smith.

24John Davidson, a resident of Annapolis, served in the American Revolution and retired with the rank of major. He was appointed collector of customs at Annapolis on August 3, 1789, and inspector of the port on March 6, 1792 (Executive Journal I, 10, 14, 102, 104, 111). In 1794 he was appointed brigadier general of the Maryland militia for Calvert and Anne Arundel counties.

25Robert Ridgely, a lawyer and resident of Baltimore, was elected to the Continental Congress in 1785 and 1786 but declined to serve in 1786. He was a member of the Maryland Senate from 1786 to 1791.

26John Gassaway had attained the rank of captain during the American Revolution before he was captured at Camden, South Carolina, in 1780. He was a vestryman of St. Anne’s Parish, Anne Arundel County, from 1791 to 1793. In 1798 he was a member of a committee appointed to supervise the fortification of Annapolis.

27Roger Nelson, a lawyer, was a brigadier general in the American Revolution. In 1795 he was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates.

28George Neilson, a resident of Annapolis who had been an indentured servant, was a close friend of Charles Carroll of Carrollton.

29The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

30William Paca, a lawyer in Queen Annes County, Maryland, served in the colonial legislature from 1768 to 1774, when he was elected to the First Continental Congress. He was a member of the Second Continental Congress from 1775 to 1779 and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. On January 22, 1780, he was elected a judge of the Continental Court of Appeals (JCC description begins Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 (Washington, 1904–1937). description ends , XVI, 79). From 1782 to 1785 Paca was governor of Maryland. In 1789, in the recess of the Senate, George Washington appointed him United States judge for the District of Maryland, and the Senate approved the appointment on February 10, 1790 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 38, 40).

31Samuel Hughes.

32Edward Oldham, a resident of Cecil County, Maryland, was a captain in the American Revolution.

33This is a reference to either Edward, James, or Richard Tilghman. See notes 51, 56, and 57.

34This is a reference either to Joshua Dorsey, a resident of Frederick County, Maryland, who was elected to the state Senate in 1801, or to Walter Dorsey, a resident of Baltimore, who was a member of the House of Delegates in 1797.

35John Montgomery, a resident of Harford County, was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1796 to 1797.

36John Coleman, a native of Virginia, served as an ensign in the American Revolution. After the war he studied in England and was ordained there as a Protestant Episcopal minister. On returning to America, he settled in Harford County, Maryland.

37John Creswell was a resident of Cecil County, Maryland.

38Philip Thomas began the practice of medicine in Frederick, Maryland, in 1769. During the American Revolution he was chairman of the committee of safety for Frederick County. He was a presidential elector in 1789. He was the first president of the Medical Society of Maryland.

39John Mifflin was a resident of West Nottingham, Cecil County, Maryland.

40George Gale represented Somerset County in the Maryland Ratifying Convention of 1788. He was an unsuccessful candidate for the Senate in 1788, but was elected to the House of Representatives in that year. On March 4, 1791, he was appointed supervisor of the revenue for the District of Maryland (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 81, 82).

41Samuel Chase had served in the Maryland Assembly from 1764 to 1784. He was elected to both the First and Second Continental Congresses, serving from 1774 to 1778, and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence. He voted against the adoption of the Constitution in the Maryland Ratifying Convention of 1788. In 1791 he was appointed chief justice of the General Court of Maryland. On January 26, 1796, President Washington appointed him an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 198).

42John Carlisle, a resident of Harford County, had been a captain in the American Revolution.

43George Dent served at the Flying Camp and in the Maryland militia during the American Revolution. He was a member of the House of Delegates from 1782 to 1790, where he was a speaker pro tem in 1788 and speaker from 1789 to 1790. From 1791 to 1792 he was a member of the Maryland Senate, of which he was elected president in 1792. He served as a Republican in the House of Representatives from 1793 to 1801.

44Richard Barnes was a resident of St. Marys County, Maryland, and had large landholdings in Washington County.

45This is a reference either to Peter Ford or to Philip Ford, Jr., both of whom were members of the militia of St. Marys County, Maryland.

46Perry Benson, a Maryland planter, served as a captain in the American Revolution. In 1794 he was appointed a lieutenant colonel in the state militia, and by 1800 he was a brigadier general. In 1798 he was elected as a Federalist to the House of Delegates.

47Nicholas Hammond, a native of the Isle of Jersey, had been educated as a lawyer in Philadelphia. He moved to Maryland in the seventeen-eighties and became a prominent Federalist in Talbot County.

48Jeremiah Crabb, a resident of Montgomery County, Maryland, was a member of the House of Delegates from 1788 to 1793. In 1791 he was appointed an associate justice of the Fifth Judicial District. In 1794 he was appointed brigadier general of militia for part of Montgomery and Frederick counties. He was a member of the House of Representatives from 1795 to 1796.

49This is presumably a reference to Benjamin Rumsey, who was a colonel in the Maryland militia during the American Revolution, a member of the Continental Congress from 1776 to 1778, and chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals from 1778 to 1805.

50Andrew Hall, a resident of Queen Annes County, Maryland, was appointed postmaster of Church Hill in 1802.

51This is a reference either to James Tilghman or to his son, James Tilghman, Jr. Both men were appointed district judges in 1791.

52William Dent Beall, a resident of Georgetown, was a major in the American Revolution.

53The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

54Jonathan R. Wilmer, a lawyer and merchant, was a vestryman of St. Anne’s Parish, Anne Arundel County, Maryland, in 1795. From 1797 to 1801 he served as a member of the Governor’s Council.

55The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

56This is presumably a reference to Richard Cooke of “The Hermitage,” who changed his name to Richard Cooke Tilghman in order to inherit “The Hermitage” from his uncle, Richard Tilghman IV.

57Edward Tilghman, a native of Maryland, was educated in England and practiced law in Philadelphia.

58John Chew Thomas, a resident of Anne Arundel County, was a Federalist member of the House of Delegates from 1796 to 1797. He was elected to the House of Representatives, where he served from 1799 to 1801.

59Thomas Johnson served in the colonial and state legislatures from 1762 to 1776, from 1780 to 1781, and from 1786 to 1787. He was a member of the First and Second Continental Congresses from 1774 to 1777, when he became brigadier general of the Maryland militia. From 1777 to 1779 he was governor of Maryland, and in 1790 and 1791 he was chief justice of the Maryland General Court. George Washington nominated him United States judge for the District of Maryland on September 24, 1789, and associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States on October 31, 1791 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 29, 31, 86, 88). On January 22, 1791, he was appointed one of three commissioners for the District of Columbia. Failing health caused him to resign from the Supreme Court in 1793 and as a commissioner in 1794.

60John Henry, a lawyer educated in England, served in the Continental Congress from 1778 to 1781 and from 1784 to 1787. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1788 and was reelected in 1790 and 1796. In 1796 he received two electoral votes for Vice President. He resigned from the Senate in 1797 to become governor of Maryland. He died on December 16, 1798.

61Thomas McEldery, a resident of Baltimore, was a mayoral elector in 1796.

62George Brown was a Baltimore physician.

63John O’Donnell, a resident of Baltimore, was a member of the House of Delegates from 1792 to 1793. In 1793 he was awarded a contract to clean the streets of Baltimore.

64This is a reference either to William Goodwin, Sr., a resident of Baltimore, who was a tax commissioner in 1798 and a member of the second branch of the City Council in 1799, or to Lyde Goodwin, a Baltimore physician, who was a judge of the Criminal Court in 1788 and a judge of elections in 1796.

65Hamilton was not related to H.

66John Coulter, a Baltimore physician, was a member of the Maryland Ratifying Convention of 1788. In 1796 he was a special commissioner of Baltimore, and in 1797 he was a mayoral elector.

67Englehard Yeisser, a prominent Baltimore merchant, was a mayoral elector in 1797.

68William Kilty, a native of England, was educated in France before immigrating to Annapolis before the American Revolution. After studying medicine in Annapolis, he became a surgeon’s mate and then surgeon in the Fourth Maryland Regiment. Taken prisoner at Camden, South Carolina, he was paroled to Annapolis, where he remained until the end of the war. By 1798 he had abandoned medicine and was authorized by the legislature to compile the statutes of Maryland. From 1794 to 1796 he served on the Governor’s Council.

69Levin Handy, a native of Maryland, reached the rank of captain in the American Revolution before he resigned on May 1, 1780.

70Richard Harrison, a native of Maryland, was a merchant in Alexandria, Virginia. From 1780 to 1786 he acted as unofficial consul for the United States at Cadiz. He was officially appointed consul at Cadiz on June 4, 1790 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 47, 49). On November 25, 1791, he was appointed auditor in the Treasury Department (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 90), and he served in that post until 1836.

71This is presumably a reference to Thomas Ogle, who was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from Frederick County in 1782–1783.

72The material within brackets is in McHenry’s handwriting.

73George Baer.

74Thomas Hartley.

75William Irvine.

76William Craik, a native of Maryland and a lawyer, was appointed chief justice of the Fifth Judicial District of Maryland on January 13, 1793, and he served in that position until 1796, when he resigned. In 1796 he was elected as a Federalist to the House of Representatives to fill Jeremiah Crabb’s term. He was reelected twice and served until 1801.

77The material within brakets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

78A native of Maryland, John Gunby was a colonel in the American Revolution. He was blamed by Nathanael Greene for the American defeat at Hobkirk’s Hill. On August 3, 1798, he was appointed collector of customs at Snow Hill, Maryland, and on March 6, 1792, he was appointed inspector of the port at Snow Hill (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 10, 14, 104, 111).

79John Dennis, a resident of Worcester County, Maryland, and a lawyer, served two terms in the Maryland House of Delegates before being elected as a Federalist to the House of Representatives in 1796, where he served until 1805. In 1798 the House of Representatives appointed him one of the managers to conduct the impeachment hearings against William Blount.

80Smith Sims was a resident of Somerset County, Maryland.

81John Carroll, a native of Maryland, was educated in France. He was ordained as a Jesuit priest in 1767. Returning to America before the Revolution, he was appointed by the Continental Congress to the commission to Canada in 1776. On November 14, 1789, he was named the first American Roman Catholic bishop.

82Cox was a resident of Prince Georges County, Maryland.

83Benjamin Brookes served as a major in the American Revolution. In the seventeen-nineties he was a brigadier general of the Maryland militia. On May 29, 1798, he was appointed a major in the Corps of Artillerists and Engineers (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 277, 279).

84Richard Sprigg, Jr., served in the Maryland House of Delegates in 1792 and 1793. He was elected to the House of Representatives to fill a vacancy and served from May, 1796, to March 4, 1799.

85Uriah Forrest, a native of Maryland, was a lieutenant colonel in the American Revolution. He served as auditor of Maryland and in both branches of the state legislature. In 1786 and 1787 he was a member of the Continental Congress, and he served as a Federalist in the House of Representatives in 1793 and 1794. In 1794 he was appointed a brigadier general of the Maryland militia for Prince Georges and part of Montgomery counties. He was the business partner of Benjamin Stoddert.

86John Beale Bordley, a Maryland lawyer, was an associate judge of the Provincial Court from 1766 to 1776 and an admiralty judge from 1767 to 1776. In 1783 he was elected a member of the American Philosophical Society. He moved to Philadelphia in 1791, and there he established the first agricultural society in the United States.

87Daniel Knock, a resident of Queen Annes County, was a justice of the peace in 1794. In 1798 he was appointed to a joint commission composed of individuals from Kent and Queen Annes counties which had been formed to establish a market at Bridgetown, Kent County.

88John Coats, a native of Philadelphia, served as a physician in the American Revolution. Moving to Maryland in 1780, he became the first Grand Master of Masons in that state in 1783.

89The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

90This is a reference to either Philip or Philip Barton Key.

91Samuel Lane’s father was Hardage Lane.

92John Thompson Mason was a resident of Annapolis, Maryland.

93The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Benjamin Stoddert.

94Benjamin Edwards represented Montgomery County in the Maryland Ratifying Convention of 1788. He was appointed an associate judge of the Circuit Court for Montgomery County in 1791, and from 1797 to 1798 he served as a judge of the Montgomery County Orphans’ Court.

95This is a reference either to James Carroll, a relative of John Carroll, who was a planter in Talbot County, or to James Carroll, a Baltimore lawyer, who was appointed an associate judge of the District Court in 1791 and served as Speaker of the Maryland House of Delegates in 1797.

96Andrew Aitkin was a prominent Baltimore physician.

97Abraham Jarret, a resident of Harford County, was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1792 to 1798.

98See note 67.

99This is a reference to either James Norris, Sr., or his son, James Norris, Jr., both of whom were residents of Baltimore.

100This is presumably a reference to William Clemm, a resident of Baltimore.

101The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

102David Kerr, a native of Scotland, had settled first in Virginia, then at Annapolis, and finally at Easton, Maryland. He was a Federalist member of the House of Delegates from 1790 to 1794 and again in 1797. In 1798 Kerr tied Perry Benson in the election to the House of Delegates, but he lost to Benson in the run-off election.

103R. L. Nichols (Nicols), a resident of Easton, Maryland, served in the American Revolution. In 1789 he became the business partner of David Kerr.

104This is a reference to one of the following men: Charles Goldsborough, a lawyer, who was a Federalist member of the Maryland Senate from 1791 to 1795 and from 1799 to 1801; or Charles Goldsborough, who was a clerk in the Navy Department; or Robert Goldsborough, chief justice of the Maryland Supreme Court from April 2, 1796, until his death in 1799; or Richard Goldsborough, a resident of Dorchester County, Maryland, who was a member of the House of Delegates in 1796 and 1799.

105William Perry, a native of Maryland, was justice of the peace in Talbot County in 1774 and from 1776 to 1779. He was a member of the Maryland Conventions of 1775 and 1776. From 1786 to 1799 he was a Federalist member of the state Senate, and he was president of the Senate from 1796 until 1799.

106Donaldson Yeates was quartermaster general of Maryland during the American Revolution. He was a member of the Maryland Ratifying Convention of 1788, and he was a presidential elector in 1792.

107The words within brackets are in Stoddert’s handwriting.

108John Barnes, a resident of Washington County, Maryland, was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates in 1777, from 1779 to 1782, and in 1795.

109The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

110This is presumably a reference to Samuel Tyler, register of wills for Prince Georges County from 1782 to 1803.

111The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

112Tobias Lear.

113William Smith, a native of Pennsylvania, represented Maryland in the Continental Congress from 1777 to 1778. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1788 and served until 1791. In 1796 he was a presidential elector. In 1798 he was a merchant in Baltimore. He was also an executor of Otho H. Williams’s estate. Josias Carvel Hall was his son-in-law.

114The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

115This is presumably a reference to William Cooke of Annapolis, father of Richard Cooke Tilghman and brother-in-law of Richard Tilghman IV.

116Arthur St. Clair, a general in the American Revolution, was major general commanding the United States Army from March 4, 1791, to March 5, 1792, when he resigned.

117The material within brackets is in the handwriting of McHenry.

118John Campbell, a resident of the Eastern Shore, was a member of the Maryland Senate in 1796.

119John Coates Jones was appointed collector of customs at Nanjemoy, Maryland, on August 3, 1798, and inspector of the port of Cedar Point, Maryland, on March 6, 1798 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 11, 14, 104, 111).

120The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

121Thomas Fitzgerald was a resident of Charles County, Maryland.

122This is a reference either to George Stricker, a native of North Carolina, who had served in the American Revolution and who had represented Frederick in the Maryland legislature, or to John Stricker, his son, also a veteran of the American Revolution. John Stricker was a resident of Baltimore and had been second in command of the Maryland militia commanded by Samuel Smith during the Whiskey Insurrection.

123Peter Hoffman, a native of Frederick County, Maryland, was a prominent merchant. In 1771 he moved his business to Baltimore, and in 1794 he established the wholesale dry goods firm of Hoffman and Company there.

124Robert Bowie was a captain in the American Revolution, and from 1786 to 1790 he was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates. In 1794 he was appointed a justice of the peace and a major in the militia. In 1796 he was an elector for the state Senate.

125Gabriel Christie, a member of the Maryland militia during the American Revolution, had served in the Maryland House of Delegates. He was a Republican member of the House of Representatives from 1793 to 1797 and from 1799 to 1801.

126David Lucket represented Montgomery County in the Maryland House of Delegates in 1794.

127Henry Carberry, a native of Maryland, had served as a captain in the American Revolution, and he was a captain in Major Henry Gaither’s battalion in the levy of 1791. He was appointed a captain in the United States Army on March 14, 1792 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 114, 116). He resigned his commission on February 10, 1794. He served as adjutant general of the Maryland militia from 1794 to 1807.

128This is a reference to one of the following men: Richard Hall Harwood, a resident of Anne Arundel County, who was a member of the Maryland House of Delegates from 1798 to 1799; or Thomas Harwood, who was appointed commissioner of loans for Maryland on August 6, 1790 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 57); or William Harwood, who was clerk of the Maryland Ratifying Convention of 1788 and of the Maryland House of Delegates in the seventeen-nineties.

129Jonathan Sellman was a resident of Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

130The material within brackets is in the handwriting of Stoddert.

131Nathaniel Ramsay, a resident of Cecil County, was a member of the Maryland Convention of 1775, and he served as a lieutenant colonel in the American Revolution until he was captured at Monmouth. He was a member of the Continental Congress from 1786 to 1788. On September 24, 1789, he was appointed United States marshal for the District of Maryland and was reappointed on December 27, 1793 (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 29, 31, 143, 144). On December 10, 1794, he was appointed naval officer for Baltimore (Executive Journal, I description begins Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate (Washington, 1828), I. description ends , 165).

132This is presumably a reference to either Robert or James Milligan of Cecil County, Maryland.

133Elie Williams, a veteran of the American Revolution, was the brother of the late General Otho H. Williams, who had been collector of customs at Baltimore. Elie Williams was clerk of the Circuit Court for Washington County during the seventeen-nineties and was an Army contractor with Robert Elliot for the western posts. During the Whiskey Insurrection the firm of Elliot and Williams was agent for provisioning the militia army.

134Robert Elliot was Elie Williams’s partner. He was killed by the Indians in the Northwest Territory on October 6, 1794.

135William W. Bond was a resident of Baltimore.

136Richard Harrison.

137This is a reference either to Michael O’Brian or to Michael O’Brine, both of whom were residents of Baltimore.

138The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

139The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

140The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

141The material within brackets is in Stoddert’s handwriting.

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