Thomas Jefferson Papers

To Thomas Jefferson from George Jefferson, 30 June 1800

From George Jefferson

Richmond 30th. June 1800

Dear Sir

After meeting with repeated disappointments I at length succeeded in getting the Hhd: of lime, which I sent up on Friday last by Henderson’s boats.

The person of whom I got it promised to send in his bill but he has neglected to do so. he informed me it would be 5/. per bushl.

The long delayed business of the nail-rod is at length in a train to be settled—Mr. Nicolson having a week or two ago received a remittance from his friend in Carolina in a bill on New York at 60 days.

From your last letter upon this subject I conclude that I must have omitted to informe you that I was induced to put this business into Mr. N’s hands in consequence of my hearing that he was the agent of the underwriters on the vessel; together with my not having known any one else who had a correspondent in the place to which the vessel was carried. but for these reasons I should have preferred getting almost any other person to have negociated the business, and the event has shewn that my unwillingness to avail myself of his offer, was not without foundation.

I am Dear Sir Your Very humble servt.

Geo. Jefferson

RC (MHi); at foot of text: “Thos. Jefferson esqr.”; endorsed by TJ as received 3 July and so recorded in SJL.

Long delayed business of the nailrod: in early January 1799 George Jefferson learned that the Rising Sun, a vessel carrying TJ’s nailrod, had been abandoned at sea and subsequently brought into the customs district of Camden, North Carolina (George Jefferson to TJ, 8 Jan. 1799). For the last letter on the attempt to recover costs for the salvaged iron, see TJ to George Jefferson, 20 Mch. 1800. TJ may have also referred to the nailrod in the illegible letter to George Jefferson of 31 May (see note to George Jefferson to TJ, 23 June 1800). TJ did not receive payment from George Nicolson until September (George Jefferson to TJ, 22 Sep. 1800).

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