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The inclosed letter from mr Brackenridge on the subject of the mounds & remains of fortifications in the Western country, came to me without any indication whether meant, or not, for communication to the Philosophical society . considering it’s subject and the information it contains as meriting the attention of the society, I take the liberty of requesting your communication of it to them;...
your kind and Friendly Letter found me in great affliction for the loss of my dear and only daughter, mrs smith She had been with me only three weeks having undertaken a journey from the State of N york , desirious once more to See her parents, and to close her days under the paternal roof She was accompanied by her Son and daughter , who made every exeertion to get her here, and gratify what...
I must beg you for a hamper of charcoal to dry our malt. Capt Miller apologises for not comeing up befor this—his excuse is the dampness of the weather, which he does not urge on his own account, but in consideration of our malt, thinking that in his absense it might grow too fast in this weather— RC ( ViU : TJP-ER ); undated; addressed: “Mr: Jefferson Monticello ”; endorsed by TJ as a letter...
Your favor of July 25. is just now recieved: and I have read with pleasure the account it gives of the antient mounds & fortifications in the Western country. I never before had an idea that they were so numerous. presuming the communication was meant for me in my relation with the Philosophical society , and deeming it well worthy their attention, I have forwarded it to them, and with my...
Your fa letter of Aug. 20. enabled me to turn to mine of Feb. 23. 98. and your former one of Feb. 22. 1801. and to recall to my memory the oration at Jamaica which was the subject of them. I see with pleasure a continuance of the same sound principles in the address to mr Quincy . your quotation from the former paper alludes, as I presume, to the term of office of our Senate ; a term, like...
Considering all things, I admire D r Priestleys last Effort for which I am entirely indebted to you. But as I think it is extreamly imperfect, I beg of you to pursue the investigation, according to your promise to D r Rush , and according to your Syllabus. It may be presumptuous in me to denominate any Thing of Dr Priestley imperfect: but I must avow, that among all the vast Exertions of his...
I was in hopes, after recieving the reacknolegement of your deed to mr Short that all further trouble was at an end. but a more serious one arises. Col o Monroe called on me two days ago and stated that the deed to mr Short had run in upon his prior one, and included some of the land, which he claims now to have settled. as he does not state this error of the lines as of his own knolege, but...
Th: Jefferson incloses to Col o Monroe the copy of a letter he proposes to send to mr Champe Carter , if the contents meet his approbation; which he asks the favor of him to signify to him, with the return of the letter. he sets out to mr Madison’s early tomorrow morning, weather permitting, which he does not mention to have any influence on Col o Monroe’s movements. perhaps indeed their...
I intended calling on you to day, which I still hope to be able to do in the afternoon. Your letter to Mr Carter is in all respects what it should be. I intend also to write him, & will bring my letter to him to show you. I think it most adviseable that we should avoid a meeting at Mr Madisons , for the reason that has occured to you. I had intended to set out back to washington , in the...
Ja s Monroe’s best respects to M r Jefferson — He hastens to communicate to him the very interesting intelligence rec d this evening from the Secry of the navy , on which he gives him his most sincere congratulations RC ( DLC : TJ Papers , 199:35463); partially dated at foot of text; endorsed by TJ as a letter of 23 Sept. 1813 received the following day.
Being advanced in Years ( 63 ) I find my former profession, of a Teacher, rather irksome—Hence, I am desirous of obtaining the appointment a Chaplain to one of the Brigades of the U. States Army — My son Donald Fraser Jun r now at “ Fort George ” writes me that a Chaplain is Chaplain’s office is now vacant
I have the pleasure of receiving yours of the 18 th this day—the work of Tracy , is going forward but slowly, as I cannot devote from my present engagements the time I should wish to see it pushed forward. I have put it in the hands of one of Neef’s assistants, a sensible and liberal young man ; and Neef is able to render the abstruseness of Tracy’s metaphysis a little more comprehensible than...
I met with Doct r Flood at Buckingham court house on the second monday of the present month. From him I had the pleasure of hearing you were in good health and that a letter from you to me had been put into the mail at his Fathers on that morning—The letter has not been received and I am unable to account for its failure—Even if it had gone on to Richmond it ought to have reached me on Tuesday...
My residence in the country during the Summer has prevented me from answering sooner your very polite note of the 20 th of August covering a communication to M r Allen which was immediately transmitted to him. It is now a long time since I was tempted by the request of Gen l Clark & other friends as well as by the natural interest of the subject to undertake the composition of the narrative...
I inclose you the letters on finance, for perusal. I had not an opportunity of proposing the reading them to the President , there being much company with him. when will the ladies & yourself do us the favor of a visit? RC ( NN : Monroe Papers); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “The Secretary of State”; with endorsement and notes by Monroe on verso. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosures: TJ to...
Vous trouverez, ci-Inclus, la feuille que par La faute de mon relieur vous n’avez pas reçu beaucoup plutôt. Je vous prie, d’avoir pour lui & pour moi beaucoup d’Indulgence The “American Brewer & Malster” n’a point encore paru. Je veille cet ouvrage pour vous l’envoyer aussi tôt qu’il sera Imprimé. J’ai deux ouvrages on brewing l’un intitulé “the philosophical principles of the Science of...
Enclosed I submit to your perusal, what I trust will be deem’d worth the trouble— If after a Year, these Treasury notes (become due), were rec d as Cash in paym t of Subs n to the loan, it would give them full credit & enable Gov t to issue more—The loan would also be obtain’d on more advantageous terms, as these note holders would encrease the number of competitors for the loan— RC ( DLC : TJ...
I have read with great interest & satisfaction your remarks on finance, which I return by the bearer. we are now at the mercy of monied institutions, who have got the circulating medium into their hands, & in that degree the command of the country, by the adventurers in them, who without mu ch capital are making fortunes out of the public and individuals. many of these institutions are hostile...
May I beg your acceptance of a copy of the Nautical Almanac for 1814? RC ( DLC ); endorsed by TJ as received 10 Oct. 1813 and so recorded in SJL . Enclosure: Blunt, Blunt’s Edition of the Nautical Almanac and Astronomical Ephemeris, for the year 1814 (New York, 1813; Sowerby, E. Millicent Sowerby, comp., Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson , 1952–59, 5 vols. no. 3810).
I take the liberty of troubling you on behalf of a Cap t Joseph Millar , stationed at Charlottesville as an Alien ; and will state his case as represented to me, and as believed by me. his father & mother came over about 1768. to Maryland to settle there. he was born there soon after their arrival, and the father dying, the mother thought it safest to return to her friends in Ireland where...
I have duly recieved your favor of Sep. 18. and I percieve in it the same spirit of peace which I know you have ever breathed, and to preserve which you have made many personal sacrifices. that your efforts did much towards preventing declared war with France , I am satisfied. of those with England I am not equally informed. I have ever cherished the same spirit with all nations from a...
σὲ γὰρ πάντεσσι θέμις θνητοῖσι προσαυδᾶn . “It is not only permitted but enjoined upon all Mortals to address you.” Why should not our Divines translate it “It is our duty and our priviledge to address the Throne of thy grace and pray for all needed lawfull Blessings temporal and Spiritual,.” Θεμiς was the Goddess of honesty, Justice, Decency, and right; the Wife of Jove , another name for...
I have So far intruded as to give the bearer hereof Joel Walker Esq r this letter of introduction to You he lives in the State of Ohio & has partook of the privations & hordships of a Soldier he merely wishes to see You & Your situation I think him Worthy Your Notice I am Yours Respectfully RC ( DLC ); dateline at foot of text; addressed [torn]: “ Monticello M r
In my letter of Aug. 10. I informed you I should draw on you from Bedford for 600.D. in favor of Brown & Robertson . this I accordingly did; and from the same place made three other draughts in favor of the sheriff of Bedford for 111.D. Nimrod Darnell 50.D. & Jeremiah A. Goodman 37.50 D it is questionable however whether this last will be called for. in the same letter I mentioned that I...
I have Receivd your Letter of the 2 d Ins t And have inclosd to Cap t Miller a Written Permit to Return to Norfolk —He must Consider the Liberty as Subject to be Revoked by any anstance of Misconduct Hostile to the Government—And also In the Event of the Commissary Generals disapprobation—Neither of Which I apprehend— I congratulate on our late Successes on the Lakes
Your very Acceptable favour— tho dated, the 18 th Ult o did not reach, me before late last evening— conveying the ageeable intilligence— Gen l Kosciuskos receiving—your last years Remittance for ƒ5,500 franc’s—with order to remit his Annual Int thro same Convenint Channel— in consequence, I instantly Addressed a few lines to M r Geo Williams —at
It is with extreme reluctance I trouble you with these lines; I never yet applied to any living being for aid, whilst I could by dint of industry & the help of my talents work my way through the world: neither should I have resorted to this means now, were it not for the sake of my family. the height of Political intolerance made me quit Boston in the fall of 1807 (I had been teaching french...
Since mine of Aug. 22. I have recieved your favors of Aug. 16. Sep. 2. 14. 15. and ___ and mrs Adams’s of Sep. 20. I now send you, according to your request a copy of the Syllabus. to fill up this skeleton with arteries, with veins, with nerves, muscles and flesh, is really beyond my time and information. whoever could undertake it would find great aid in Enfield’s judicious abridgment of
I am favord with your letter of the 6 th Ins t and shall attend to the several dfts as they appear, I now send you inclosed $300 in small notes—as also a note for renewal on the 29 th Ins t for your signature— I have this moment learnt from M r Higginbotham that he is going up immediately, and as there is some risk in sending notes by the mail, I have asked the favor of
M. Bacon & C. Peyton have bargained for all the corn C. Peyton may have to sell—except about Seventy barrells—that is C.P. is to let M. Bacon hav e One hundred Barrells if he makes as much to sell aftar deducting the above Seventy; the Corn to be recav d between the 1 st & tenth of Nov r On the rivar bank. at Twenty Shilling