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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Volume="Jefferson-03-06"
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M. Bacon & C. Peyton have bargained for all the corn C. Peyton may have to sell—except about Seventy barrells—that is C.P. is to let M. Bacon hav e One hundred Barrells if he makes as much to sell aftar deducting the above Seventy; the Corn to be recav d between the 1 st & tenth of Nov r On the rivar bank. at Twenty Shilling
William Ballard engages himself to serve Thomas Jefferson as an overseer at his place called Tufton during the year ensuing, to commence the 1 st day of December next and faithfully to do his duty in that capacity: and the sd Thomas Jefferson agrees to find him six hundred weight of pork, corn bread sufficient for himself & family, and a barrel of flour, and moreover to allow him sixty five...
Thomas Jefferson Esq. o To Mutual A. Society D r 389 For Quota due 1811 12. 84
You had a right to expect to hear from me ere this on the su b ject of a paiment. but I am one among the unfortunate who have been caugh t by the blockade before the sale of my flour. I have between 4. & 500. barrels now in Richmond , & not a barrel sold. I have desired mr Gibson to hold up for 7.D. thro’ this month, but then to sell for whatever he can get. the moment I hear from him that he...
In a letter from mr Paul Allen of Philadelphia , I was informed that other business had obliged you to turn over to him the publication of Gov r Lewis’s journal of his Western expedition; and he requested me to furnish him with any materials I could for writing a sketch of his life. I now inclose him such as I have been able to procure, to be used with any other information he may have...
Being so much more within writing distance here than at Monticello , and with time freer from interruption, I avail myself of it to renew to you the assurances of my constant friendship, and my wishes for your health and happiness. and as brother Jonathan must have become stale and lost his powers of excitement, I send you a little work of a higher order to make you laugh on a gloomy day. it...
I should not so soon have troubled you with a reply to your friendly favor of Mar. 15. but for your saying that ‘if I wish to look into your work on the diseases of the mind you will send me a copy.’ I read with delight every thing which comes from your pen, and the subject of this work is peculiarly interesting. the book by Bishop Porteous which you were so kind as to inclose me, was safely...
Your’s is recieved by Squire , and the girl begins this morning the first necessary branch, which is roving, or spinning into candlewick to prepare it for the spinning Jenny . this will take her some days, more or less, according to her aptness, and then she will commence on the Jenny. as she appears rather young, it will probably taker take her a month or 6. weeks to learn well enough to be...
Your favors of Mar. 9. and 23. are both safely recieved and I shall with pleasure write to the President on the subject of the last. this I do merely because it is your wish, being satisfied the President can need no excitement in your favor beyond his own knolege & approbation of the uniform line of your conduct. We are here in a state of close blockade, tantalized indeed with propositions of...
I was so unlucky as to write you a long letter of business , when, as I learned soon afterwards, you were too ill to be troubled with any matter of business. my comfort has been in the confidence that care would of course be taken not to disturb you with letters. my hope in writing the present is of a pleasanter kind, the flattering one that you are entirely recovered. if the prayers of...