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M. Bacon & C. Peyton have bargained for all the corn C. Peyton may have to sell—except about Seventy barrells—that is C.P. is to let M. Bacon hav e One hundred Barrells if he makes as much to sell aftar deducting the above Seventy; the Corn to be recav d between the 1 st & tenth of Nov r On the rivar bank. at Twenty Shilling
William Ballard engages himself to serve Thomas Jefferson as an overseer at his place called Tufton during the year ensuing, to commence the 1 st day of December next and faithfully to do his duty in that capacity: and the sd Thomas Jefferson agrees to find him six hundred weight of pork, corn bread sufficient for himself & family, and a barrel of flour, and moreover to allow him sixty five...
Thomas Jefferson Esq. o To Mutual A. Society D r 389 For Quota due 1811 12. 84
You had a right to expect to hear from me ere this on the su b ject of a paiment. but I am one among the unfortunate who have been caugh t by the blockade before the sale of my flour. I have between 4. & 500. barrels now in Richmond , & not a barrel sold. I have desired mr Gibson to hold up for 7.D. thro’ this month, but then to sell for whatever he can get. the moment I hear from him that he...
In a letter from mr Paul Allen of Philadelphia , I was informed that other business had obliged you to turn over to him the publication of Gov r Lewis’s journal of his Western expedition; and he requested me to furnish him with any materials I could for writing a sketch of his life. I now inclose him such as I have been able to procure, to be used with any other information he may have...
Being so much more within writing distance here than at Monticello , and with time freer from interruption, I avail myself of it to renew to you the assurances of my constant friendship, and my wishes for your health and happiness. and as brother Jonathan must have become stale and lost his powers of excitement, I send you a little work of a higher order to make you laugh on a gloomy day. it...
I should not so soon have troubled you with a reply to your friendly favor of Mar. 15. but for your saying that ‘if I wish to look into your work on the diseases of the mind you will send me a copy.’ I read with delight every thing which comes from your pen, and the subject of this work is peculiarly interesting. the book by Bishop Porteous which you were so kind as to inclose me, was safely...
Your’s is recieved by Squire , and the girl begins this morning the first necessary branch, which is roving, or spinning into candlewick to prepare it for the spinning Jenny . this will take her some days, more or less, according to her aptness, and then she will commence on the Jenny. as she appears rather young, it will probably taker take her a month or 6. weeks to learn well enough to be...
Your favors of Mar. 9. and 23. are both safely recieved and I shall with pleasure write to the President on the subject of the last. this I do merely because it is your wish, being satisfied the President can need no excitement in your favor beyond his own knolege & approbation of the uniform line of your conduct. We are here in a state of close blockade, tantalized indeed with propositions of...
I was so unlucky as to write you a long letter of business , when, as I learned soon afterwards, you were too ill to be troubled with any matter of business. my comfort has been in the confidence that care would of course be taken not to disturb you with letters. my hope in writing the present is of a pleasanter kind, the flattering one that you are entirely recovered. if the prayers of...
M r Goodman’s crop for the next year 1814. will be as follows. Corn in M c Daniel’s field; but as this turns out to be but 50. acres, we must add other grounds to it; and there are none but what belong to some other field, except the those over the S. Tomahawk, & above the lower corn field. we must of necessity then give the tobacco ground, & the stubble ground there to corn, and put the upper...
I recieved your former favor stating the prices of mill work, and finding that mr Brown’s bill was considerably different, I proposed to him to refer the bill to you, and to ask the favor of you to come and see the work and settle the prices between us. this favor I have now to ask of you, and shall very gladly pay you for your time whatever you think proper. if you could name the day that...
Your letter of yesterday found me unprovided with the sum you desired; but I have been able to borrow it among our merchants who are not much better off than others, all business being at a stand. we are experiencing the most calamitous year known since 1755. the ground has been wet but once since the 14 th of April . my wheat yielded but a third of an ordinary crop, about treble the seed. of...
Your favor of the 1 st inst. is recieved, and I will now ask the favor of you to procure for me such a gold watch as I described in my letter of May 20. that is to say, excellent in it’s quality, but only moderately ornamented, just enough to make it fit for a lady. on a similar occasion of such a watch from your father in 1808. I had procured mr Short procured for me a chain of Paris gold (...
Since my letter of June 27. I am in your debt for many; all of which I have read with infinite delight. they open a wide field for reflection; and offer subjects enough to occupy the mind and the pen indefinitely. I must follow the good example you have set; and when I have not time to take up every subject, take up a single one. Your approbation of my outline to D r Priestly is a great...
I think you cannot be unacquainted with old mr Strode of the county adjoining to yours, with his former fortunes, and the misfortunes perhaps by which he has lost them. his qualifications for business too are generally known. he is now in indigence, and want. how this happens while his son is otherwise I know not. I have recieved a letter from him , by which I find he wishes for some...
I inclose you the letters on finance, for perusal. I had not an opportunity of proposing the reading them to the President , there being much company with him. when will the ladies & yourself do us the favor of a visit? RC ( NN : Monroe Papers); dateline at foot of text; addressed: “The Secretary of State”; with endorsement and notes by Monroe on verso. Not recorded in SJL . Enclosures: TJ to...
I duly recieved your favor of June 25 th . I had before heard of the unfortunate turn of your affairs, but did not know your losses had been so entire as to leave you wholly dependant on your personal industry and at this age. it is a consolation that you have always possessed the resources of talent, industry, & integrity, and that at your age you have still health to use them efficiently in...
By the help of your survey , I am now enabled to lay off my fields to my mind. but there are 3. or 4. dividing lines to be run with a compass & chain. I stay to see this done, in the hope that the day after you get here back from Albemarle court, you will be so good as to come & run them for me. it will take a few hours only, and the moment they are run, so that my overseers may know h where...
The sum I owe you is between five hundred and forty or fifty Dollars. I have this day written to mr Gibson that I shall draw on him for it the next month, and I will take care that it be paid there by the day you name, the 17 th of December . Accept my respects RC ( ViHi ); addressed: “Craven Peyton esq. Monteagle .” Not recorded in SJL . TJ’s
I am really very thankful to you for the patience with which you have waited for the paiment I should have made you. I am one of the unfortunate on whom the blockade came before I had sold a barrel of my flour. I am now authorising mr Gibson to sell it for 4.D. which after the expence of barrel grinding & transporting, neats me 2½ D. a barrel or 47. cents a bushel for my wheat. in the mean...
I have just recieved from Gen l Kosciuzko a duplicate of his letter of May 30. to which he adds this P.S. ‘you render me a great service by the arranging arrangement with mr Morton to whom I owe many thanks for the most obliging manner in which I have been treated at Paris , and for the exactitude of his correspondent.’ this channel then being so agreeable to the General we had better adhere...
Ἴδαν ἐς πολύδενδρον ἀνὴρ ὑλητόμος ἐλθὼν, Παπταίνει, παρέοντος ἄδην, ποθεν ἄρξεται ἔργου· Τί πρᾶτον καταλεξῶ; ἐπεὶ πάρα μυρία ἐιπῆν. and I too, my dear Sir, like the wood-cutter of Ida, should doubt where to begin, were I to enter the forest of opinions, discussions, & contentions which have occurred in our day. I should exclaim with Theocritus Τί πρᾶτον καταλεξῶ; ἐπεὶ πάρα μυρία ειπῆν . but I...
Th: Jefferson presents his respects to mr Derieux , and incloses him a letter he has lately recieved from a mr Dutasta , now at New york which it may be interesting to mr Derieux to answer. as Th:J. is just now setting out on a journey & to be absent some time, he supposes mr Derieux’ answer had better go to New York direct. PoC ( DLC
Our spinning machine is in operation, and a piece of cloth is begun with the flying shuttle, neither goes on perfectly as yet, from the want of a little more practice; but they will give Mrs. Clay an idea of what would be their proper operation, if she can do me the favor to come and take a plantation dinner with me tomorrow. You will come of course, according to promise. Friendly salutations...
The enemy, contrary to expectations, still continuing in our waters and indicating by no movement an intention of speedy departure, with the rapid advance of the season, begin to fill me with anxiety as to the fate of my crop of flour. and I am becoming more concerned to get some price, than what that price shall be, on the principle that half a loaf is better than no bread. engagements...
M r Edmund Randolph’s indisposition has probably prevented as yet his attendance at his court to acknolege and forward the deed for mr Mazzei’s lot. the first court of Albemarle after he shall have forwarded it to me, it shall be dispatched. I presume that the deed having been actually executed, as before advised, the delay of the formality of acknolegement will occasion no hesitation in mr...
I have duly recieved your favor of Sep. 18. and I percieve in it the same spirit of peace which I know you have ever breathed, and to preserve which you have made many personal sacrifices. that your efforts did much towards preventing declared war with France , I am satisfied. of those with England I am not equally informed. I have ever cherished the same spirit with all nations from a...
I originally employed you to build my saw mill having confidence in your work & prices. when it was turned over to mr Brown , it was understood between you and myself that he was to be governed by your prices. we are now about coming to a settlement, which renders it necessary for me to ask the favor of your prices. mr Brown handed me a bill of yours, but it related only to gristmills,...
I turn with great reluctance from the functions of a private citizen to matters of state. the swaggering on deck, as a passenger, is so much more pleasant than clambering the ropes as a seaman, & my confidence in the skill and activity of those employed to work the vessel is so entire, that I notice nothing, en passant, but how smoothly she moves. yet I avail myself of the leisure which a...