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I was much concerned to learn by a letter from Mess rs Gibson & Jefferson of Richmond that they found difficulty in procuring a bill for the remittance I desired to be made to you. I immediately wrote to them to inclose you a hundred dollar bank bill of Richmond , which I doubted not you could have exchanged. the difference between this & the amount of your bill would be no more than a just...
Your letter of Feb. 25. never got to my hands till last night. the purchase of the horse from you by mr Darnell was on my account, and the debt as much acknoleged as if a bond had been given. I had desired my merchant in Richmond , as soon as he could sell my flour from the Poplar Forest (which got down but lately) to remit a sum of money to mr Goodman , sufficient to pay your’s and other...
In my answer of the 7 th to yours of the 3 d of Mar. I omitted to note what you had stated as to the bargain for Mazzei’s lot, to wit that the paiments were to be made within so many days after a sufficient title shall be made. I now expect daily an answer from mr Randolph after which there will be no delay in making what I deem a good title. but if mr Taylor should deem it otherwise, I take...
The blockade of the Chesapeak having sunk the price of flour to 7. Bar Dollars , for which I am not disposed to sacrifice mine, and being desirous that my debts in your neighborhood therefore should not be put off for that sale, I have this day written to mr Harrison of Lynchburg to pay you 250.D. on the 7 th of April , and I have countermanded the directions
I wrote you on the 7 th a request that the money for my tob o might be paid in Richmond . it now occurs that I have about 250.D. of debts to pay in the neighborhood of Poplar Forest which it would be more conveniently done by what is in your hands, than by drawing it back again from Richm d . you will oblige me therefore by paying that sum, when due, to Jeremiah A. Goodman , and having paiment...
Your favor of the 1 st has been recieved, and altho’ it was incomprehensible to me what certificate the clerk of Henrico could want as to the deed to which you were a witness , yet I sent it to the clerk of Albemarle , who might know better. I reinclose you the deed with his answer. it is certain that the clerk of Henrico has taken a mistaken view of the subject, which I hope he will correct,...
Your letter of Feb. 3. has been recieved, and in answer to your enquiries respecting sheep, I will state that I have three distinct races which I keep at different places. 1. Merinos; of these I have but 2. ewes, and of course none to spare. President Madison has been more succesful, and sells some ram lambs, but not ewes. the Merino is a diminutive tender sheep, yielding very little wool, but...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Cocke, whose servant is desired to take as many Broom plants as he pleases, but having never found them to succeed by transplantation, he sends him some seed, which generally succeeds, altho sometimes it does not come up till the second spring.— he sends him also a little seed of the Sprout Kale , a plant he recieved from The National garden of...
Thomas Jefferson N o 701–170–1340 702–170–1344 703–170–1404 704 788 –170–1354 789–170–1330 705–170–1050 706–170–1300 985–170–1412 986–170–1212 987–170–1276
In the name of God Amen. I Anne S. Marks late of the county of Louisa , now of Albemarle , being in health of body and mind, making make the following disposition of my estate real and personal after my death. First it is my will that all the debts wh with which I am chargeable either on my own account or as executrice of my late husband Hastings Marks , be paid out of my whole estate. then I...
This indenture made on the 26 th day of March one thousand eight hundred & thirteen , between Thomas Jefferson of Monticello in the county of Albemarle on the one part, and Thomas Jefferson Randolph , his grandson of the same place and county on the other part witnesseth that the said Thomas Jefferson in consideration of the affection he bears to his said grandson Thomas Jefferson Randolph , &...
Know all men by these presents that I Thomas Jefferson of Monticello in the county of Albemarle in consideration of my affection to my grandson Thomas Jefferson Randolph of the same place & county have given to my said grandson four negro slaves to wit Thruston the son of Isabel , Bec daughter of Mine r va , Lewis
I recieved the day before yesterday mr Edmund Randolph’s answer that he would execute any deed I should desire for mr Mazzei which should bind go to warrant only against himself & his heirs. I have thought it best to make a statement of the title which the purchaser may consider, and verify every material part of it for himself by the records at Richmond . he will see that the title is so...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Gerardin Girardin & is sorry he cannot furnish him the Early York cabbage seed. he has ceased to cultivate it because the seed cannot be raised in this country. he sends him some green curled Savoy cabbage, the only kind he has. he sends him also some Malta Kale which he recieved from that island and finds preferable to t either the Scotch or...
Yours of the 23 d Ult. has been duly recieved, and I shall place the subject of it before the President in a letter I am to write him immediately on another subject. nothing certainly can give me greater pleasure than to be useful to you on this and every other occasion. at the same time I am satisfied no stimulus can be wanting on the mind of the President . nobody better knows your...
Your favor of Mar. 13. was long on the road, owing to the season and my distance from the great post roads. I thank you for your polite attention on the subject of my letters to the late mr Paine . while he lived, I thought it a duty, as well as a test of my own political principles to support him against the persecutions of an unprincipled faction. my letters to him therefore expressed the...
Your favor of Mar. 15. on the subject of mrs Julia Bradley formerly Webb, has been duly recieved. I have in vain ransacked my own memory to recall any knolege of her which I might have had: but the failure of that recollection is no proof against the fact, the multitude of those occasionally made known to me having rendered a distinct remembrance of them too much for my memory. I have...
Your favor of Mar. 25. is recieved and I thank you for the offer it makes. I had desired mr Gibson on the reciept of my flour to remit 250.D. to Goodman as soon as he could make any sale. I found afterwards no sale could be made for a reasonable price, and therefore wrote the request to you to furnish that sum to Goodman . in the , and countermanded my order on mr Gibson . in the mean time...
Your letter of the 26 th has been recieved, as had been that of the 5 th . the preceding ones had been complied with by applications verbal and written to the members of the government, to which I could expect no specific answers, their whole time being due to the public, & employed on their concerns. had it been my good fortune to preserve at the age of seventy all the activity of body & mind...
Your favor of Mar. 24. is recieved, and nothing could have been so pleasing to me as to have been able to comply with the request therein made, feeling especial motives to become useful to any person connected with mr M c Mahon . but I shall state to you the circumstances which controul my will, and rest on your candor their just estimate. when I retired from the government, 4. years ago, it...
As I presume you will go to court tomorrow, and I shall not, I must ask the favor of you to call on me. the perseverance and hostility of Cap t Meriwether renders Hornsby’s claim a very serious thing, and he will probably endeavor to engage the other two infant claimants to refuse their confirmation also. I wish to consult you on the best means of treating with those claimants & obtaining...
Your favor of Feb. 14. has been duly recieved, and the MS of the Commentary on Montesquieu is also safe at hand. I now forward to you the work of Tracy , which you will find a valuable supplement and corrective to those we already possess on political economy. it is a little unlucky that it’s outset is of a metaphysical character, which may damp the ardor of perusal in some readers. he has...
1813. Apr. 7. I promise to pay to Edmund Bacon or order on or before the 1 st day of August next one three hundred and seventy Dollars for value recieved. I say 370. Dollars, witness my hand this seventh day of April eighteen hundred & thirteen the above belongs to John Bacon of the County of Botetourt to whose credit the money must be Applyed when recev d agreeable to Assignment
The paper now returned was by accident misplaced, & thus escaped the attention it was entitled to. I consider every thing as useful which will dignify & consecrate the great event of our independance in the minds of our fellow citizens, & impress them with the importance of maintaining it sanctimoniously. and it is equally desirable to place before their eyes the constitutions of the different...
I du ly recieved your favor of the 9 th ult. on the interesting subject of ou r trade, and the importance of defending it; a trade certainly of th t value to us. a country of such extent as ours, of all the varying pro ductions of the earth, capable of yielding in some of it’s parts what ever may want, will, at no distant period, under our rapid popula tion internal commerce sufficient for the...
I thank you for the historical work you have been so kind as to send me. but to give the precise opinion on it which you ask, is not very easy. History is one of those branches of science which different persons will pursue to greater or less extent in proportion to their views and opportunities. those of higher aims will resort to the original authors that nothing known to others may be...
Your favor of Mar. 15 is duly received. I think the time-piece should not be risked until our coast becomes entirely safe by an armistice, or considerably so by some remission in the vigilance of the British cruisers. In the meantime, I should be glad you could take charge of it yourself and keep it agoing. Perhaps, if Mr. Voight has prepared the apparatus for ascertaining the rod vibrating...
I should not so soon have troubled you with a reply to your friendly favor of Mar. 15. but for your saying that ‘if I wish to look into your work on the diseases of the mind you will send me a copy.’ I read with delight every thing which comes from your pen, and the subject of this work is peculiarly interesting. the book by Bishop Porteous which you were so kind as to inclose me, was safely...
Doct r Patterson informs me that the time piece you have been so kind as to make for me, is now ready, and advises with me as to the sending it during the present blockade of the Delaware & Chesapeake . I have written to him that I would rather it should not be risked until the coast becomes safer; and have expressed a wish that in the mean time he would take it to his house, and with the rod...
Your favor of Mar. 4. is just now recieved, and I should be glad to render to mr Fulton any service in my power. of the prospect of utility from the establishment of a steam boat on the Patomac , he is a better judge than I am. James river , from Norfolk to Richmond is offers the only other establishment occurring to me in this state which could be profitable. but my interior situation, on an...