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In the Month of June 1781, near Milton on my way to Join the Marquis La Fayette’s Army I met with a Mr. Long, who informed Me that Duvit [Jouett] had arrived the preceeding evening at Charlottesville, and brought information of the approach of the English to that place under Tarleton. Upon inquiring from Long whether Mr. Jefferson had receiv’d information he was ignorant; I immediately...
In compliance with your request, I have endeavoured to charge my recollection more minutely, concerning the particulars of my intercourse with Mr. Jefferson (at present the President of the United States) at several times while the British Army were in Virginia, in and about the year 1781. At the time General Arnold arrived within the Capes, I was preparing for a journey from Richmond, on...
Archibald Blair’s Deposition Being requested to state what I recollect of the circumstances which occasioned the loss of the public records in the year 1781, and the time Mr. Jefferson, the then Governor of Virginia, quitted Richmond upon the approach of the enemy,—I do well remember that Mr. Jefferson was extremely active in removing all public records from Richmond, and I have reason to...
The Executive will advance £20,000 to Messrs. Lewis and Thornton on the 12th. of March, and will agree to the terms proposed in Mr. Lewis’s letter of Feb. 6. 1781 . reserving a liberty to pay for the powder in tobacco @ 20/ the hundred or it’s worth in paper money as valued by the grand jury next preceding paiment. Mar. 5. 1781. The Executive will take five tons or so much of it as shall be...
Without place or date [ before 24 Feb. 1781 ]. Cannot send more than 100 men into the field with arms; but if arms could be had, “I suppose half our Militia would cheerfully turn out.” At Petersburg are 400 good Continental arms. Desires instructions. Tr ( NHi ). At head of text: “Copy of a Letter to the Governor from Colo. Banister.” This is the copy enclosed in TJ’s letter to Steuben of 24 Feb .
The arms you mention being Continental, they are subject to the orders of Baron Steuben. I have therefore sent him a copy of your letter and begged him to send you by this conveyance such orders as he thinks proper. As he is anxious that the reinforcement should be respectable I make no doubt he will order the Arms. My letters mentioning that the detachments should go under proper officers...
Major Claiborne has inclosed me a Copy of your Excellencies Letter on the Subject of the Estimate I left with him to be complied with in Virginia. I find the Executive have estimated the Amount of the Sum which will be requisite to comply with my Claims, and that the Greatness of it fixes the Impossibility even of an Attempt. It is true, in forming the Estimates , I did not consult the...
Be pleased to order to on receipt of this of the militia of your County to remain on duty only till releifs ordered from Counties less exposed shall arrive. I hope this call will be thought less heavy on your County as we would avoid calling on it to perform a full tour of duty, and only wish them to serve during those short intervals between the necessary discharge of the militia and arrival...
Frederick Town [ Md. ], 24 Feb. 1781 . Has this moment received TJ’s letter of 3 Feb. “and have to inform you that Paper Money at any rate will not answer here at present.” The Assembly having called in all Continental money, little of any kind is to be had, and people will accept nothing but specie or bills. If an opportunity later occurs of “facilitating the business in the manner you...
I have the honor of receiving Your Excellencies Letter of the 3d Instant, with an extract from Major Genl. Phillips’s Letter, which by adhering to, in Your ordering any Sum from one to five thousand Pounds in Specie to be paid Mr. Geddes here for the use of the Troops of Convention, I shall immediately Write to New York, that Your Prisoners may receive an equivalent Sum there, payable to those...
Having not yet received a General return of the men in service from the respective Counties, and time they have served, which might enable me to order releifs, from those Counties from which they ought to come, I must refer to your discretion to govern yourself by actual circumstances, and if you find a discharge of any of the militia with you necessary that you call from the Counties of York...
The Return you require was sent from this post to the adjutant General, above nine Days since. But that I suppose having miscarried from the villainy of the Express riders (every one of whom, that I am acquainted with ought to suffer Death) I herewith transmit a second Account of the two Regiments stationed at and below this place. I can with truth assure your Excellency that I never within...
Agreeable to the Instructions given by you I sent all the Men that cou’d be furnished with Armes, which Amounted to one Hundred and Six Rank and file, under the Command of Captains Hughes and Williamson. Majr. Thomas Harris being Sick stay’d at Home; tho I think the Captains will prove Sufficient for the Command they will have as they are two Gentlemen I have a great Opinion off. Our Militia...
I have received repeated information that the nakedness of the Militia on service near Wmsburg and want of Shoes is such as to have produced murmurings almost amounting to mutinies and that there is no hope of being able longer to keep them in service. The precedent of an actual mutiny would be so mischevious as to induce us to beleive an accomodation to their present temper most prudent, and...
I set out tomorrow with the Detachment from hence for Dinwiddie Court Ho. from whence my movements will be wholly directed by those of the Enemy. The necessary instructions are given to General Muhlenbg who will keep the Command at Suffolk. Colo. Innes with the Troops under his Command is orderd to pass the River and take post at Cabbin point till further orders. Genl. Weedon is orderd to...
Since I had the Honor of Writing you the 20th. Instant I have been informed that there is a Number of Prisoners of War at Winchester, that Provisions are Scarce and hard to be Procured in that Neighbourhood, and that the whole Houses are taken up. If this shou’d be the Case, it will be Necessary for me to Send a part of the Germans to Stovers Town or Shepherds Town, Neither of which will be...
Chesterfield, 23 Feb. 1781. Because of his “present constant hurry,” Davies has been unable to find “the plan for the cloathier’s department”; will forward it as soon as he can find it. The deerskins can be dressed at Chesterfield if the men who understand doing it are permitted to stay. RC ( Vi ); 2 p.; addressed and endorsed.
You’l Receive this by Mr. John Gordon who promises to take down with him the proceedings of our Court martial in September Last in regard to the Rioters then in our County. It appears we have been much blaimed by some for our proceedings, but I hope upon the matter being fully inq[uired into] they’l find we have done well. The reason we took the rioters in for 18 months was to incourage them...
Prince Edward Court House, 23 Feb. 1781. Distress of troops serving under Mazaret; three officers and twenty men have not received a farthing of money or an article of clothing since last March “—they are all as naked as when they were born.” Sends Capt. Lt. Rice to TJ “in hopes of some relief.” After a six-week retreat Mazaret arrived at Prince Edward on the 20th with “5 pieces of Artillery,...
War Office [ Richmond ], 23 Feb. 1781. Encloses two accounts for the expenses of Capt. Sansum in collecting and bringing over eighteen-month men from the Eastern Shore. As Sansum’s authority was derived from Col. Webb, Muter does not know how to act in his case, especially since other officers have been and are now employed in collecting those men and deserters in that region, “in consequence...
I beg leave to remind your excellency of the situation of John Dean, a supposed fugitive from the lead mines, in defiance of the condition of his pardon. It is probable, that the actual abandonment of the place of labour will not be fixed upon him: ‘tho’ nothing can be more satisfactory, than that he had made preparations for flight. I say this upon the information of Colo. Lynch. Now I refer...
Till it is decided whether Cornwallis will cross the Roanoke or not we ought at all events to be prepared for the worst for which purpose we may have occasion for the troops under the command of Colo. Innes to cross the James River and I shall send orders for him to hold him self in readiness to move at a moments notice. But previous to such a movement (if it should take place) it will be...
New London, Staunton, Winchester, and Fredericksburg being appointed as places of rendezvous for the new Levies, if you have not Deputies already at those Posts, or in the Counties, you will be pleased to appoint them with instructions to furnish the Recruits with Provisions during their stay at the Rendezvous, and on their march from it. The Bearers hereof are going to Winchester to receive...
I had written the inclosed before Capt. Richeson arrived. I transmit it open through you for your perusal. I am very sorry that the men first called into the field have not been releived: but it has proceeded from the want of such a return as is mentioned in my letter and for which I applied some time ago to Baron Steuben, who has had hopes of furnishing it. You will readily be sensible that...
We sent expresses on the 17th instant to call down a fourth part of the militia of the Counties of Loudon, Fauquier, Prince William and Fairfax (about 1090) with orders to march immediately to Wmsburg. Genl. Weedon followed these orders to hasten their execution. These Counties are indeed distant, but they had been some time held in readiness; so that I hope they will afford an early and very...
[Whether restitution of the identical property taken from Mrs. Byrd might be permitted seems to be a question unnecessary now to be determined by the board as Mr. Hare the Conductor of the flag does not pretend to have brought the identical property, but goods in compensation of it; and to what amount we are uninformed. This kind of compensation we think can by no means be permitted. Let the...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your Excellencys letters of the 24th. December and 19th. January, both of which came to my hand the 13th. Instant. As Colo. Enoch Innis, who has your Excellency’s Commission as County Lieutenant, has never qualified himself to act under his Commission, the command has consequently devolved on me; I have also received the Act of Assembly for recruiting this...
I have laid the inclosed depositions before the Council. However just and proper your anxiety may be to wipe away the aspersions thrown on you, yet it seems a matter on which the Executive cannot take up on these papers; nor could with propriety take up at all where no complaint has been lodged. Perhaps the proceedings of Courts of enquiry may come properly before them: but there does not...
The object of the inclosed Memorial of Messrs. Stodder, Kerr and North being attainable by Congress only and proper to be the subject of a representation from them I take the Liberty of transmitting it to you that Justice may be done to the parties interested. I have the honor to be with great respect Gentlemen Your mo. ob. Hble Servant, P.S. We are and have long been without Letters of Marque....
By a letter from Mr. Elliott at Petersburg, I am informed that there is in the possession of Mr. McNeal, Assistant to Mr. Ross at that place, a considerable quantity of Duck proper for Tents. The difficulty of procuring this article, for want of Money, obliges me to beg of your Excellency that a part of it may be delivered to Mr. Elliott, as he can have it made up immediately. There are Twenty...
The want of a board of Council prevented our taking up the final arrangement of the Clothier’s duties till yesterday, the paper I sent you having contained only what was proposed to be agreed on. Unfortunately no copy of it was retained, so that I am obliged to ask the favor of you to return it if you still have it. We have here a large number of undressed deer-skins, and no person who can...
The establishment of a Line of riders between Genl. Gregory’s Camp and Suffolk is very necessary. I would advise you to purchase horses for that purpose at any rate almost, rather than to impress. But if you cannot purchase they should be impressed. I think it would be better, whether you purchase or impress, that it be done in the neighbourhood of the enemy as much as possible, because horses...
The present distressed Situation of the militia, under my Command induces me, to address your Excellency on their behalf. The most of them are totally destitute of the necessary cloathing to protect them from the Inclemency of the weather. They are lousy dirty and ragged, and from those Circumstances becoming every day more sickly. In addition to this such a spirit of disquietude prevails...
I Am the More flatterd By the Command Which His Excellency General Washington Has Been Pleased to Intrust to Me , As Independant of the General Good that May Be Hoped from this Expedition, It seems to Promise An Opportunity to Gratify the High Sense I Have of My Personal obligations to the State of Virginia. I Shall from time to time Inform Your Excellency of the Movements of the Continental...
I take the liberty of transmitting to you the inclosed advice of Council that proper measures may be taken for notifying it for ascertaining what officers remain on duty and calling them to take command at the several posts where men are stationed. I should be glad also that there should be an inspection return made to me of the state of the men. I am &c., FC ( Vi ). Enclosure (missing):...
I received your letter of the 18th. the night before last and deferred answering it till I could confer with Baron Steuben which I had an opportunity of doing yesterday evening. He shewed me a letter from Monsr. Tilly from which and the information of his aid who went down, we suppose the French squadron sailed on a cruise yesterday morning. They will however be within our call, and therefore...
I’ve the pleasure of informing you of the arrival of the eight prizes taken by the french Commodore Mr. Le Gardeur de tilly. They are all under the direction of Mr. Cottes which been appoint’d Commander of the prize Brig Cornwallis. Also the french Squadron [lyes] now at anckor at Linheaven Bay Between Horse Shoe and the Cap Henry. It Seems that they will enter Soon this River; the officer...
I do myself the pleasure of inclosing you the advice of Council for your appointment as finally settled. The Law which authorizes them to appoint an Engineer, restrains the rank to that of a Lieut. Colonel, and restrains also the circumstance of actual command. The resolution of Council is silent as to your continuance in Office after the War, because they are apprised of nothing which might...
I received from Mr. Armistead yesterday afternoon a Copy of the receipt for the 117 blankets. He excuses himself for the error in calling them 155 from having spoken by memory. I did not observe till I delivered it to you that the Certificate of the delivery of Mr. Ross’s blankets (105 I think they were) wanted a date. I know however that they were delivered about the same time with those from...
As the Detachment of Continental Troops will march from Chesterfield on the 25th Inst. I wish to Join to them the Militia of this County and Dinwiddie. For this purpose they must be assembled at Dinwiddie Court house, and there wait my Orders. If you have no Objection to this Plan, an Express must immediately be dispatch[ed] to inform them, as part of the Chesterfd. Militia are on their march...
I will immediately dispatch the orders you desire to the militia of Chesterfeild and Dinwiddie. Your favor of this day being put into my hands after the adjournment of Council I cannot answer as to Mrs. Byrd’s property till tomorrow. I take the liberty of inclosing you some papers relative to the nine men sent to the barracks in Albemarle, on which you will please to give any orders you think...
This evening, I recievd yours of The 15th. Instant, wherein you Call for The Assistance of our Militia, to the Aid of Gen. Greene, against Lord Cornwallis. I have the satisfaction to Inform You, that our Militia, has before this time Joind General Greene [at] headquarters. The approach of the enemy Towards this state Appeared to Alarming To await your commands, which I am In hopes will be...
I do myself the honor to communicate, to your Excellency, a circumstance which I hope will be followed by the most Salutory consequences to the State of Virginia in particular, and which may ultimately have the happiest effect upon the interests of America in general. The Chevalier des Touche, commanding His most Christian Majestys Squadron in the harbour of Newport, finding himself enabled,...
We consent to the dividing the Germans between Winchester, Martinsburg and the Berkely springs till further orders as proposed by you. I must get the favor of you to know from Colo. Mingen what sum of money by the fortnight they will have occasion for, and it shall be sent either to the Barracks in Albermarle to any Agent whom they shall leave there to settle their affairs or to their new...
It is become necessary that we ascertain the number of arms which we sent into Continental service with our regiments. As the only authentic information must come from you, I must beg the favor of you to make a return to me of the number of Arms sent on in the hands of regiments while you were Muster Master. I must pray also that this be without delay. I am &c. FC ( Vi ).
War Office [ Richmond ], 19 Feb. 1781 . “Capt. Browne [Windsor Brown] attends to know the detirmination of your Excellency and the Hon. Council respecting his acting as Commissary of military stores.” All that remains to do is to fix his “allowance,” and since he is soon to be reduced to half pay as an officer, that allowance should be “the more liberal.” In Council Feb. 20. 1781. The board...
Be pleased to issue to Mr. George Harmer a Warrant for ten thousand pounds on Account of his Subsistence agreeably to Act of Assembly in his case made. By Advice of Council. RC ( Vi : Contingent Fund Vouchers); in a clerk’s hand, signed by TJ; endorsed. See Harmer to TJ, 25 Jan. 1781 .
I am happy in having anticipated your order respecting the Arms , having before directed the Captains to collect every effective Fire lock in the County to a proper Place on the Road leading to Taylor’s Ferry, but I fear when the best endeavours are used few will be the Number, as this collection has repeatedly been made to arm the continental Soldiers sent from hence, and I cannot help...
Amelia, 20 Feb. 1781 . Received TJ’s letter of 18 Feb. this evening and will endeavor to execute the orders therein, but there will be difficulty because “the Militia has been embodied on this Alarm, and disbanded last Night, as we had not received any Orders from you or Requisition from the Commanding Officers of the Neighbouring Counties.” Brooking also received a letter this day from an...
Charlottesville, 20 Feb. 1781 . Since last writing to TJ, Clarke has received a letter from Brig. Gen. [James] Hamilton “acquainting me that it was not agreeable to Maj. Gen. Phillips that the Convention Troops should receive money for the Provisions due to them, and therefore he wishes that the Germans should receive the Provisions here and the British at Frederick Town.” RC ( Vi ); 2 p.;...