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[ Without place or date ] In a long war the difficulty and expense of raising men increases, and “every possible means should be employed for the preservation of the Men after they are raised.” The incomplete state of the regiments obliges one regiment to be shifted into another, destroying the attachment between officers and men “which is necessary for their preservation.” The officers,...
I have to [entreat?] that your Excellency would be so kind as to forward the letters that accompany this; that addressed to [Gen.?] Huger to Charles Town You will be pleased to send southwardly, and I could wish that your Excellency would so far indulge me, as to enclose it with any occasional dispatches, either to Genl. Greene or to Governor Nash. I have already, If I am not mistaken,...
Colo. Muter will be pleased to enquire into the particular arms and accoutrements delivered by deserters into hands responsible to the state, and to settle a price on them at about 80 for one of what they used to cost in the state. I will send the individuals to Colo. Muter. RC ( PHi ); unsigned; addressed by TJ: “Colo. Muter”; endorsed: “Govr. respecting those people who have recd. Arms from...
Mr. Torriano has permission to visit Colo. Wilson Miles Cary at his residence either in Fluvanna or Hanover, he there considering himself as under all the obligations of his parole other than that which is meant to be hereby dispensed with as is necessary to give him the benefit of this permission. Dft ( DLC ). There were two Torrianos who were British officers serving in America: Charles, It....
The bearer hereof a deserter from the British army has permission to cross James river at Goochland Courthouse and to remain on the South side of the river above Chesterfeild county, conducting himself with fidelity to this commonwealth. Dft ( Vi ); endorsed: “Pass to the Deserters.” At foot of text, in a hand other than TJ’s: “15 Copies.” There is no good clue as to the date of this paper.
N ( DLC ); entirely in TJ’s hand. Undated, but after before Gen. Lee’s dismissal by Congress 10 Jan. 1781 ( JCC Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789 , ed. W. C. Ford and others, Washington, 1904–1937 , xvi , 33) and before after the Boards of War and Trade were abolished in June 1780. TJ became familiar with the “rapacity, inattention and means of evasion” practised by forage...
You will please to take measures, for immediately establishing an Express at Hampton, one at Williamsburg, and keeping an Express house at York. An Express will be sent from hence to remain at N: Kent Ct. house. Circumstances render it most essentially necessary, that this measure shou’d be at present taken, that the quickest intelligence may be conveyed from Hampton to this place, shou’d...
[ Richmond?, before 2 Oct. 1780. Minute in Journal of the Commissioner of the Navy (Vi), under date of 2 Oct.: “Letter from Commodore Barron referred from his Excellency the Governour.” An entry of 3 Oct., following, states that a reply was written by James Maxwell to Commodore Barron “inclosing a Form of a List of Seamen employed in the Navy of Virginia.” Neither Barron’s letter nor Maxwell’s...
I am sorry to be obliged to inform you that it is out of our power to have paiment made of Mr. Clay’s draught for 225,000 dollars. Our treasury is at present absolutely exhausted, and no prospect of it’s being replenished till the assembly shall have met and have had time to provide supplies. I hope this will reach you in time to prevent the additional disappointment which might arise from...
[ Richmond, 2 Oct. 1780. Minute in Journal of the Commissioner of the Navy (Vi), under this date: “Letter written to his Excellency the Governour relative to Capt. Richd. Barron.” Not located.]