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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Wood, James" AND Volume="Jefferson-01-04"
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I received a Letter from General Gates on the 14th. Sept. communicating Intelligence which he had received of a design meditated by the Enemy to make a lodgement at Portsmouth in this State. Tho’ I thought it very improbable under the then existing Circumstances it was yet my duty to communicate it to Congress and apprise them of our general Situation. In my Letter was this paragraph. ‘another...
Mr. Martin receives body shirts and hunting shirts for the regiment of guards, clothing for the officers, and some for yourself. Your portion being not equal to what you expected it becomes my duty to explain it. On the discontinuance of the board of War the Executive finding that the method which had been followed of issuing individual orders for clothing had produced great inequality they...
Baker was to give notice to Colo. Crockett when he should have ready subsistence and pack horses for him. Colo. Matthew’s Suggestions as to the Militia shall be submitted to the Council, and the result communicated to Colo Crockett. I am sorry to hear that your Supplies of Provision are still precarious. Mr Divers has made a Proposition to victual the troops on contract, which we think to...
Your letters of the 11th. and 14th. inst. are now before me. I inclose you four blank powers to be directed to any person or persons you shall think proper for Green briar or any other county. I am informed beef may be had in Frederic and Hampshire. I am only to desire that when you fill up any of these powers you immediately communicate to me the name of the county and persons inserted...
Certain information being received of the arrival of an enemy’s fleet in the bay, it is thought expedient to decline for a time at least the sending Colo. Crocketts battalion to the Westward, as it is possible their services may be wanting elsewhere. Be pleas’d therefore to forward the inclosed to Mr. Madison requiring him to bring the beaves he had collected for that battalion to the...
The Enemy invading us appearing now to be in force the Executive have determined that the Convention Troops be removed without delay. You will therefore take immediate measures for their removal to fort Frederick as directed by the Board of War. Previous to the publication of this measure another is expedient: The Regiment of Guards you know is enlisted to serve only till the departure of...
My letter by Cap. Read which could not be come to hand when yours of the 26th came away will have answered beforehand the several matters stated in that except as to the division of the Convention troops into three parts. This I apprehend is contrary to the Convention, and I should expect would render their government and safe custody more difficult. My last intelligence is that the troops who...
No movement of the enemy since my last has contributed in the least to declare their object. They have left the north side of James river, and taken possession of the Country on the south side as far up as Suffolk. Still we are told they keep a considerable part of their troops on board their Ships. They are making great collections of horses to mount their men on, and taking possession of all...
Your representation on the want of barracks at Fort Frederick has been again the subject of consideration with the board, together with a Letter from Govr. Lee informing me it is not in their power to make more than a partial provision for the Subsistence of the Convention troops. Our apprehensions as to desertion to the enemy and corresponding with the disaffected arise from the British...
Your Letters of the third and fifth instant are now before me. My last to you which you could not have received on the fifth will I think have anticipated some parts of these letters. The terms of the Officers paroles, being that they will not say or do any thing to the prejudice of the united States while they are under the convention of Saratoga, and that they will remain within certain...