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Documents filtered by: Volume="Adams-06-08"
Results 181-210 of 270 sorted by author
Permitt me to express how sorry I have been at not being able to comply sooner with your desires, relative to the Account of the United States, till the 11th of February, at which time the Intention of Congress was Known; Some of the Articles that were Kept in suspençe were the Obstacles that prevented it. I am however happy to find that the present Letter with the inclosed Account to that...
I take the liberty, to address myself to your Excellency, about a project I have send to Mr. Franklin the 20. of Septr. last; which contains in short the following. I propose that if I could have the honour to be admitted into the Service of the United States, with the Commission of Major, to form a small Corps of Artillery, consisting in 300. Men, divided into 6. Companies; all the...
Philadelphia, 16 October 1779. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:183–184 . Like those for the peace treaty (calendared above), these instructions had been adopted on 14 August ( JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, Washington,...
I have the honour to transmit you herewith enclosed Two Commissions wherein you are Authorized and appointed Minister Plenipotentiary from these United States to Negotiate Treaties of Peace and Commerce with Great Brittain; Accompanied with instructions in each Case, for your government in the Execution of those Several Commissions. For your further Information and benefit, are enclosed Copies...
Philadelphia, 16 October 1779. printed JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:181–183 . Although dated 16 October, the instructions had been adopted on 14 August ( JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, Washington, 1904–1937; 34 vols. , 14:956–960)....
The Melasses business would certainly have proved the source of continual disputes, if it had not been altered; but the mischief which might have been expected from that is beyond doubt comparison less than what is pointed out in my letter to Mr. Lee of 18th. May. My apprehensions on this subject were communicated to the Commissioners at this Court; but I am sorry to say that they made no...
I have received your favour of 13th. May, on the subject of Dr. Franklin’s conduct on the 12th. of last January, for which I thank you. I should have been glad if you had gone more fully into it; perhaps however it is unnecessary, as the principal fact is established. I can have no objection to your communicating our correspondence on this subject to Dr. Franklin; but you will be good enough...
I am informed by a Letter from Nantes that the Alliance arrived there the 18th, and that she had 250 Men on board; she will therefore probably sail soon. My first Letter to you after your departure from hence desired that you would put the Letters addressed to the Committee, and to the Delegates from the State of South Carolina on board of some vessel that would sail before the Alliance. Your...
As I have not been able to procure from Dr. Franklin his reasons in writing for disobeying the order of Congress of 7th May 1778, I have desired Mr. Lee to favour me with a Copy of his Minutes, respecting our conversation on that subject on 12th of January last. I enclose them for your perusal, and should be obliged to you if you would attest them. If you find any mistakes, or omissions, you...
I was favoured yesterday with your Letter of 12th and congratulate you on your safe arrival at Nantes. Accept of my thanks for the trouble you have taken in delivering my Letters into the care of Mr. Cumming, Mr. Ingraham, and Mr. Ridley. You say nothing of the Letter, and the two packets of Newspapers addressed to Mr. Lloyd; as I have not received a Letter from him, for the last three, or...
I am favoured with your Letter of 12th, and am sorry to find that you have had so much trouble about the Frigate. The accounts which we had of the small number of hands she had, made it probable that she would not sail soon. Perhaps this detention may prove to be “all for the best.” Some wise people are of opinion that this is always the case; and though the maxim has undergone the criticism...
On the 20th. August last I had the Pleasure of recieving and communicating to Congress your Favors of the 3d. and 4th. of that month. Be pleased to accept my Congratulations on your safe Return to your Family and Country. Yours of the 27 Feby. and 1st. March last came to Hand about ten Days ago. An Expectation of having Commands from Congress to transmit, induced me to delay writing ’till now....
I am greatly obliged to You for your favor of the 13 Instant. I am flattered much to find, that my Sentiments meet with your Approbation, the great Part you have taken in the American Question, and your Judgement in it, are such as give You a right to Influence and direct every One interested in the Event. Be Assured, Sir, it is my Inclination and Duty to Attend to whatever you may think...
I cannot express the pleasure it gave me; when I heard of your Safe Arrival in Europe; permit me to congratulate you and myself thereon, and what is more our Country, whose true Interests I Know you have so much at heart. If I may trust the Common reports, you come in the Character of the blessed Peace Maker, who is always welcome to the Friends of Mankind; No one can wish you more success in...
I Hope this will meet you in good Health at Nantes and that you will find every thing there Agreable to your Wishes. By the Mail from England we learn Lord Norths Plan for raising the Money already voted. 1stly. a Surcharge of 5 per Cent on the Amount of all the Articles of the Duties of Excise and Customs, except, Beer, Soap, Candles and Hides *2dly. 9d. per Stage for last Horse in Post...
I have receivd your favor Acknowledging the Receipt of Mine of the 24th of April, which seems to have been long while getting to you. I was sorry to hear of your Dissapointment in going in the Alliance, which some people here think woud be better Employed in convoying on the Coast of America the very important fleet now gone then any marading Scheme Whatever. I suppose you will Accompany the...
I did myself the Honor of writing to You, two days Ago by Mr. Brusch, to congratulate you on your Safe Arrival in Europe, and to Assure you of my Disposition and wish to Execute whatever Commands, you may lay on me here or Elsewhere. As I Know your Attention to whatever may affect our Country, I take the Liberty of making an Extract out of a Letter I receivd yesterday from England, from the...
I am much honored by the open and Confidential Manner, in which you have written to me; in return to which, I must assure you, that I heartily Concur with You in your Sentiments of the Necessity of the french Courts holding a Most liberal and neutral Conduct, and that it will do so, I look upon the New Appointment, to be an Earnest. I am to have the Honour of meeting the Gentleman, who is...
I did Myself the pleasure of writing to You by the Secretary of the Count de la Luzerne, inclosing a Letter to Genl. Gates and sending a Remembrancer. I was in Hopes of sending to You by the same Opportunity 4 Parliamentary Registers containing the Papers, which have passed between the Howes Burgoyne and the Ministry, but having lent them to Mr. Genet coud not get them back with time Enough to...
You will confer on me a singular Obligation by favoring me with your Opinion and Advice respecting the unhappy misunderstanding which I am told prevails on board the Alliance. I ask your advice because, tho I am determined to preserve Order and Disciplin where I command, yet I wish to reprove with moderation and never to punish while there remains a good Alternative. It appears that there is a...
I heard with a great deal of pleasure your happy return to Boston and your appointment by Congress as plenipotentiary for the next Peace, they could not commit Such an important Trust to abler hands than yours. I wish with all my heart you may have the earliest opportunity of going to work, and to Settle all matters to the greatest honor Glory and happiness for the United States and yourself....
To the numerous congratulations which you have received on your safe arrival in America, permit me to add my tribute, and to felicitate you on your safe return to your Family, friends and Country, and event which I am certain gives you true pleasure and happiness, whatever motives produc’d it, Whether Faction, Ambition, or—as I am a very bad Statesman—true policy in order to procure proper...
I received your obliging favor of the 19th last month by Mr. Lowell, for which I thank you. Mr. Gerard has been to Camp, and has return’d to Philadelphia, to embark on board of the Confederacy for France, on board of the same Ship Mr. Jay and his Family embark. Mr. Gerard made us happy, politically so I mean, by informing us of your appointment as sole Minister plenipotentiary for the purpose...
As I came but this morning from Versailles, it was not in my power sooner to answer to the letter you have honor’d me with, and this duty I now perform with the more pleasure that it is of some importance to the interests of America. Since the first day when I had the happiness of making myself, and of being considered in the World as an American, I have always observ’d that among so many ways...
I beg leave of applying to you in an instance where I am much Concern’d. The Case I shall lay before you, and Reccommend to your good Care. There is an officer in Paris Whom I want to send over to America on Board the Alliance, and whom I know would be of some use in the American Army. For that Reason Besides this of Reccommendations I have a great Regard for, I wish the Gentlemen Might find a...
I thought that I should postpone answering the letter of 18 December, which Your Excellency did me the honor to send, until I could give you an account of the success of my efforts in the execution of your orders. I neglected nothing, but am mortified to find that all my pains have been insufficient and it has been impossible to prepare things as promptly as Your Excellency wished for his...
J’ai crû devoir differer de repondre a la depeche que Vôtre Excellence m’a fait l’honneur de m’adresser le 18 du Courant jusqu’a ce que je pusse rendre compte de Succès de mes demarches pour l’execution de Ses ordres. Je n’ai rien negligé pour y parvenir, mais j’ai eu la mortification d’éprouver que tous mes soins n’ont pas été suffisants a cet égard et qu’il ne m’a pas été possible de faire...
I have had the honour of your favour of the 1st Instant, and recollect with pleasure, the social hours we passed together at Genl. Whipple’s. Indeed it would not be an easy matter for me to forget a person, in my estimation, of your consequence; and am very happy to find the acquaintance that commenc’d there, is likely to be increased, by the honor and satisfaction of your Company as...
Monsieur Le Cte. D’orvilliers m’a renvoyé la lettre que vous lui avez ecrite au Sujet des Matelots Américains qui peuvent Se trouver à bord du Vaisseau le fier Rodrigue. Empressé d’aller au devant de tout cequi peut concerner le Service des Etats unis de L’Amérique, et particulierement de cequi peut être agréable à Votre Excellence, j’ai Sur le champ marqué au Capitaine du Vaisseau Le fier...
The Count Dorvilliers has sent me the Letter you wrote him concerning the American sailors that are on board the fier Rodrigue. Always desirous to render every service, that depends upon myself, to the United states, and more so in what may be agreeable to your Excellency I immediately ordered the Cap of said Vessel, to deliver these Men to Mr. Landais. The Cap whose Crew is very week,...