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Your Letter of 14th Instant from Nantes reached me to Day only. It was but very lately that I heared of your having left the Metropolis, and but now of your intentions of going to America. I have written to Doctor Franklin on the Subject you allude to, and have had the pleasure of an Answer from him, by which I perceive that at Paris they are not well acquainted with the Duties and imposts...
By the last Post I was highly gratified by your kind and very polite Favour of the 10th. of Sepr. The Notice and Recollection of my former Letter sufficiently convinces me that You have not forgot an old Friend. In your Absence I had frequent Temptations to write You; but I was affraid of being amongst the Number of troublesome and useless Correspondants. We have finished Our foreign Affairs...
Ordered that the honourable John Adams Esqr. have the Loan of one Qto: vol: entitled “All the Memorials of the Courts of Great-Britain and France, since the peace of Aix la Chapelle, relative to the limits of the Terrotories of both Crowns in North America &c.” now belonging to the Library in the Council Chamber, to be returned by him into said Library so soon as he shall have done with the...
The General Assembly having for many Reasons, and for purposes appearing to Them advantagious, taken the Resolution to negociate a Loan of One hundred and fifty Thousand Pounds Sterling in Europe, to be conducted agreeable to the enclosed Instructions given to the Agent Jonathan Loring Austin Esqr. appointed for that purpose. The Success of this undertaking is important to This State, and We...
On my return from the circuit a few days ago I was honoured with your letter of the 20th. Septemr. last, and proud to find that I was not forgotten by one I so much esteem. You must have had your difficulties in these times, I know, I too have had my full share of the anxieties cares and troubles attending the present war. For sometime I was obliged to act as President of the Delaware State...
I had the honour of adressing your Excellency the 26th Ultimo advising that by the officious impertinence of the asesor to this Governour, I had been Arrested and my house Embargoed notwithstanding I had presented my Certifycate and Passport, given by the Plenipotenciarys of the united States Residing at Paris, and allso proved that I had always Subscribed a subject of those States, in the...
I had the Pleasure of Addressing you the 5th Currente to Which Please be Referd and Since am Honour’d With your Truly Esteem’d Letter of the 31 ultimo and am Happy to Learn your Safe Arrival at Bordeaux on your Route to Paris. Your Thanks is Much more than an Equivilante for any Services I Wished to do you At Madrid. I onley Considred that as part of My duty, as well to Serve the united States...
I am Honourd with your Much Esteem’d Letter of the 24th, Nov. Since Which Should have had the Pleasure of Addressing you My Respects often but Was by the loss of a Vessel Unexpectedly Called to one of the Out Ports on this Coast Where I have been Kept more than two Months without being Able in that time to write to My House More than once on Account of the Very bad Convayance for Letters thro’...
When I was Advised of your Arrival at Corunia I had the Pleasing hopes that Your Destination Was the Court of Madrid and Accordingly porposed myself the happiness of Paying you my devoirs there in the month of Aprile. I Also Presumed on taking the Liberty of Writing My Banker in that City Messr. Peter Casamayor & Co. to Make you a Tender of their Services in my Behalf, and to Supply you with...
I received your much esteem’d letter of the 22d. with the memorandums it inclosed of the articles you wish to send to Boston by the Alliance. Captain Jones, on my application to him to permit those goods to be loaded on his vessel, immediately consented and told me he wou’d write you by this post, in consequence of which I shall prepair them and distinguish the property as you direct. In Mrs....
The same Opinion of your Abilities and Zeal for our country which made me rejoice in your accepting of an embassy to France, leads me to rejoice with most of your countrymen in your Safe return to your native Shores. I am sure you cannot be idle nor unconcerned ’till the Vessel in which our All is embarked is safely moored. We stand in greater Need than ever of men of your principles. You may...
Accept of my thanks for your early and puntual Attention to my letter. I have ever thought myself honoured in your friendship, and shall be happy at all times in cultivating a correspondence with you. In your first letter you enquire after the state of our goverment. The best answer I can give to your Question, is that I am Afraid to commit my Opinion of men and measures in our state to...
I cannot help troubling you with a second Answer to your letters on purpose to congratulate you upon the Success of your Schemes for prosecuting the war in the Southern states. Count D’Estang has done wonders. He will be acknowledged by posterity as one of the deliverers of our country. We have just heard that he is safely arrived with all the trophies of his American conquests off the Capes...
I have the honor of sending you inclose a Letter received per this Morning’s post and altho I expect to have that of seeing you dayly I have thought proper to send it you per this conveyance as if you are on your way here that it can not miss you on the road. We have learnt that the french frigate the Surveillante has sent it in two English Privateers at L Orient and sunk three others. The...
I am favoured with your kind Letter of the 26 Instant and return you my sincere thanks for the good Councils and assistance you have given Cap Landais persuaded how conducive this will be to forward his departure. I send an Express to inform that the Milford the british Ship proposed for the Exchange of Prisoners is just arrived in our River with ninety Seven Americans and to direct if you...
The Officers of the Alliance having express’d some discontent at my offering them two Months advance out of which they were to furnish themselves the Cloaths they would think fit, and his Excellency B Franklin having directed me in any such difficulties to apply to you I will take it as a particular favor if you will be kind enough to let me know your opinion on that subject that I may act in...
I hope you are ere now safely arrived at L Orient and that you have found all the arrangements made for your passage to America to your Satisfaction, which I shall be happy to learn, particularly as it is wispered here that the Alliance’s destination is again changed and that she is to go strait to Boston, I sincerely wish it for you persuaded how much more agreable it will be to take your...
I am honoured with your favor of the 2 Instant in compliance to which I have wrote to Cap Landais for Mr. T. Greenleaf’s passage. Inclose you will find the note of Sundry Articles which Mrs. Schweighauser has bought for Mrs. Adams amounting to 1730:16 which she hopes will meet with her approbation. This small Sum you will please to pay either to Mr. Odea or Messrs. Puchelberg & Co. at L Orient...
Humbly Sheweth that your Petitioner is a poor american just arived from Marttanico to Rochal in a french frigat. At my arival I got my Disscharge, and from that I travild by Land hear to, Bordeaux. A few days after I Came hear I Was taken Very Ill in the Small pox. I being a stranger in this City, not knowing Where to go, or what to do for any Quarters to Lay my Self Down in this Dissorder...
printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:251–252 Replying to John Adams’ letter of 19 Feb. (calendared above), Vergennes noted that Adams’ account of his commissions agreed with that of Conrad Alexander Gérard and that the most important aspect of his mission, the negotiation of a peace treaty,...
Versailles, 15 February 1780. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:245 Vergennes stated that he thought it best to await the arrival of Conrad Alexandre Gérard, who presumably would bring a copy of Adams’ instructions and additional information on the nature and scope of his mission, before...
The preceeding is copy of my last, of the 17th. Decr. by the Alliance Frigate, who sail’d the 14th. Janry. I hope she is safly arrived with you? I have your esteemed favor of the 2nd. Decr. by which I find my Son, is happily situated at Montauban, with Mr. Revallat aine, a Gentleman of good Character, with whom he will have opportunity of acquireing many advantages. It gives me real Pleasure...
I am Told that in the few Letters which have been received from you here you Complain greatly that your Friends dont write to you oftner, and that you seldom hear from America. I easily Conceive such A Situation painful, and have Contributed my Mite to prevent it by writeing by every good Opportunity and long Letters too, for I know that People in high Stations have their Curiosity as well as...
The Providence Frigate, and a Packet have been long held in readiness to proceed to France. The first is now ordered to Another Service and we have yet no Orders for the last. This is to go by A small private Vessel Accidentally met with. I dare say you Experience in Common with us the Inconveniencies of the little Intercourse between Europe and America, and wish with the same Anxiety to hear...
This Morning your Vigalent and invariable Friend wrote you a long letter which makes it unnecessary for me to take up my pen nor should I have done it by this opportunity but in Compliance with the Wishes of Him who is so partial as to think it in my power to Contribute to the Entertainment of a Gentleman who (from Interest, from Vanity and from more Noble principles) has such a Multitude of...
I heartily congratulate you on your safe Return to Europe and thank you for your obliging Care of my Letters from my Friends, which I received last Post from Bilboa. I shall be greatly obliged to you if you will employ a leisure half Hour in giving me a little Sketch of our public Affairs in America, so far only as is prudent for you to communicate, and proper for me to know. Please to let me...
I am sorry this Town has fewer Charms for you than a Ship of War,— You surely will have enough of the Sea on your Passage and methinks the Shore, now Nature is putting on her most agreeable Dress, is capable of giving you more pleasure. If you think the Situation of my House pleasant enough, you may be as compleatly Commander of it as you can be of any Frigate in the Service. You may remember...
I have not written to you since your Departure because I have not before had anything to communicate, and now it is probable you will have already heard what I have to say. The last accounts from England inform us that Pondicherry and Chandanargor in the East Indies are taken by the English, after above two months Seige. The Papers say also that a french Man of War and a Frigate are lost on...
Your Flattery has effectually ingaged me in your Correspondence, for when my Services in writing can at any time amuse or inform you, You may assure your self I shall most cordially become your Volentier. Commodore Manly as he is called is again taken in the Cumberland by the Pomona Frigate Capt. Waldergrave. Compte De Stang sailed the 12 of Jany from Martinique and Byron from St. Lucie. They...
270Editorial Note (Adams Papers)
Of the eleven states that adopted constitutions during the Revolutionary period, Massachusetts, ratifying its document in 1780, was the last. (Connecticut and Rhode Island, both with corporate charters that granted broad autonomous powers, did not revise their organic law until the nineteenth century.) The General Court had drafted a constitution which it presented to the towns in 1778, but...