You
have
selected

  • Volume

    • Adams-06-08

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 50

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Volume="Adams-06-08"
Results 241-270 of 270 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 9
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I am ashamed to acknowledge that I received your kind Letter, in due time, and have not answered it before: My apology is that I was on the Point of Setting out for Brest when I received it and have been travelling ever since. I am much obliged to you for the Letter and very happy to find that one Gentleman is to be found in France whose sentiments will give some Countenance to my own. I have...
I have the Honour to inform your Excellency, that I expect to imbarque and Sail for America, in fifteen days that if your Excellency or any of his Majestys other Ministers, have Occasion to Send any fresh Dispatches to any Part of the united States, So good an Opportunity may not be omitted. The season promisses a short Passage, and I shall be happy in this opportunity, and in every other, of...
The preceeding is copy of my last, of the 17th. Decr. by the Alliance Frigate, who sail’d the 14th. Janry. I hope she is safly arrived with you? I have your esteemed favor of the 2nd. Decr. by which I find my Son, is happily situated at Montauban, with Mr. Revallat aine, a Gentleman of good Character, with whom he will have opportunity of acquireing many advantages. It gives me real Pleasure...
I beg leave of applying to you in an instance where I am much Concern’d. The Case I shall lay before you, and Reccommend to your good Care. There is an officer in Paris Whom I want to send over to America on Board the Alliance, and whom I know would be of some use in the American Army. For that Reason Besides this of Reccommendations I have a great Regard for, I wish the Gentlemen Might find a...
I did myself the honor of writing to you a few Days since. Last Night I received yours of the 31st past. I am glad to hear the Ship is so far in order. As to the Discontents you find among the Officers and People, it is impossible for me at this Distance to judge of them, or of the means of removing them: I must therefore, as in my last, refer to your Judgment whatever you may think for the...
Your Flattery has effectually ingaged me in your Correspondence, for when my Services in writing can at any time amuse or inform you, You may assure your self I shall most cordially become your Volentier. Commodore Manly as he is called is again taken in the Cumberland by the Pomona Frigate Capt. Waldergrave. Compte De Stang sailed the 12 of Jany from Martinique and Byron from St. Lucie. They...
Monsieur Le Cte. D’orvilliers m’a renvoyé la lettre que vous lui avez ecrite au Sujet des Matelots Américains qui peuvent Se trouver à bord du Vaisseau le fier Rodrigue. Empressé d’aller au devant de tout cequi peut concerner le Service des Etats unis de L’Amérique, et particulierement de cequi peut être agréable à Votre Excellence, j’ai Sur le champ marqué au Capitaine du Vaisseau Le fier...
The Count Dorvilliers has sent me the Letter you wrote him concerning the American sailors that are on board the fier Rodrigue. Always desirous to render every service, that depends upon myself, to the United states, and more so in what may be agreeable to your Excellency I immediately ordered the Cap of said Vessel, to deliver these Men to Mr. Landais. The Cap whose Crew is very week,...
I received the Letter you did me the honour to write to me of the 24th past. I am glad you have been at Brest, as your Presence there has contributed to expedite the Operations of Capt. Landais in Refitting his Ship. I think with you, that more has been made of the Conspiracy than was necessary; but that it would have been well if some of the most guilty could have received a proper...
I am favoured with your kind Letter of the 26 Instant and return you my sincere thanks for the good Councils and assistance you have given Cap Landais persuaded how conducive this will be to forward his departure. I send an Express to inform that the Milford the british Ship proposed for the Exchange of Prisoners is just arrived in our River with ninety Seven Americans and to direct if you...
When I arrived at this place I found nothing done. Mr. Costentin, it is said waited for orders. And the officers of the Port, expected orders. But Since my Arrival, as Mr. Schweighauser wrote to Mr. Costentin to take my Advice, he readily engaged in the Business, and the officers of the Port have afforded Us every facility, consistent with the Kings service. Mr. Costentin and Captain Landais,...
I receivd your favor by Mr. Blodget and thank you. It seems uncertain where or how this will find you, therefore I shall not enclose the Cypher. When I know where a private hand may find you, I will send it so as to be secure. A person is nominated to take the place of the great man at Philada. who will leave it upon his arrival. You will probably get thither before him. We have no other local...
I have not written to you since your Departure because I have not before had anything to communicate, and now it is probable you will have already heard what I have to say. The last accounts from England inform us that Pondicherry and Chandanargor in the East Indies are taken by the English, after above two months Seige. The Papers say also that a french Man of War and a Frigate are lost on...
I had the Honour of a Letter from, your Excellency at Nantes, but as I was setting off for this Place could not then acknowledge it. I Staid, no longer at Nantes, than just to look about me, before I determined to see Captain Landais, that I might know, the state and Prospects of his Frigate. As you was so good as to desire Mr. Schweighauser, to consult with me, and Mr. Schweighauser wrote to...
I have just received your favour of the 17. inclosing a Paper from M. Le Roy, for which I thank you and Mr. Le Roy, to whom be so good as to present my Compliments. The Alliance, will be ready to go to Nantes, in the opinion of C. Landais in 8 days. But he thinks she must stay there 3 or 4 Weeks. My Respects to his Excellency; from whom I received a line at Nantes which I will answer, as soon...
I have this Moment the Honour of yours of 18. I am perfectly of your Opinion that We have yet a hard Battle to fight. The Struggle will yet be long, and painfull, and the Difficulty of it will arise from nothing more than the weak Disposition both in our Country men, as well as our Allies to think it will be short. Long before, this War began I expected, a severe Tryal: but I never foresaw so...
That Mr. John Adams threatned Mr. Izard with the Displeasure of Congress in his opposing the 11th. and 12th. Articles of the Treaty of Commerce; and, that the said Mr. John Adams entertained Expectations that Congress would be inattentive to the Interests of nine States of America to gratify the Eaters and Distillers of Melasses. Evidence. Mr. Izards Letter to the President 12th. Sepr. 1778....
I was favoured yesterday with your Letter of 12th and congratulate you on your safe arrival at Nantes. Accept of my thanks for the trouble you have taken in delivering my Letters into the care of Mr. Cumming, Mr. Ingraham, and Mr. Ridley. You say nothing of the Letter, and the two packets of Newspapers addressed to Mr. Lloyd; as I have not received a Letter from him, for the last three, or...
Yesterday’s advices from England inform us, that Gen. Lincoln was collecting an Army in S. Carolina to meet the Invaders, and that Prévot was to be re-inforcd from N. York; so that it looks as if the War woud be transferd to the Southward. The English loan rises rapidly in its value, as appears by the Omnium, which in a few days mounted from 4 PCt. to 6½. Besides this our Enemies will...
I have the Honour to inclose to you some News Papers which contain all the material News you could hear, if yet at Passy. There have been great Troubles in our Opera; But as you were not an Amateur I shall not trouble you with a Relation of ’em. You must have now more entertaining Novelties at Nantes. I Shall take the Liberty to send you every Week, the news Papers, till your Departure which I...
I Hope this will meet you in good Health at Nantes and that you will find every thing there Agreable to your Wishes. By the Mail from England we learn Lord Norths Plan for raising the Money already voted. 1stly. a Surcharge of 5 per Cent on the Amount of all the Articles of the Duties of Excise and Customs, except, Beer, Soap, Candles and Hides *2dly. 9d. per Stage for last Horse in Post...
I have had the honour of your favour of the 1st Instant, and recollect with pleasure, the social hours we passed together at Genl. Whipple’s. Indeed it would not be an easy matter for me to forget a person, in my estimation, of your consequence; and am very happy to find the acquaintance that commenc’d there, is likely to be increased, by the honor and satisfaction of your Company as...
I should be obliged to you to let Mr. Franklin take a Copy of our Letter to the Comte De Vergennes, relative to sending a Naval Force to America. The original Draught you have, which I should be obliged to you to send to me at Nantes after Mr. Franklin has taken a Copy of it, as I have no Copy of it, at all. I am with great Respect, your humble servant RC ( MH-H : Lee Papers); docketed by...
Mr. Vernon Junr. having obtained a knowledge of the French Language sufficient to introduce him into a Compting House he is return’d to Bordeaux. I have taken him to my Lodgings but my concerns not being sufficiently extensive and varied as to give him the knowledge it will be his Interest to acquire I propose engaging some House of distinguish’d Character to take him into their Compting House...
I am Honourd with your Much Esteem’d Letter of the 24th, Nov. Since Which Should have had the Pleasure of Addressing you My Respects often but Was by the loss of a Vessel Unexpectedly Called to one of the Out Ports on this Coast Where I have been Kept more than two Months without being Able in that time to write to My House More than once on Account of the Very bad Convayance for Letters thro’...
I have received your Billet of the 6. Feb. and altho I am much obliged by your Care to put me on my Guard, against dangerous Men: Yet I am extreamly Sorry to find, that Slander has been So successfull, as to impose upon you, who I know have no sinister Motive, nor any Thing to byass you; in this Case from the Truth and the Interest of a Country whose Welfare you wish. The “Freres” have been...
Since I wrote you in January, I have not been favour’d with a line from you. Since I heard of the change which lately took place in the Administration of our Affairs at this Court, I took the liberty to address Doctor Franklin, on the Subject of my last Letter to you. Having a large Ship now here, which I want to ballast with Salt, but can not unless furnish’d with an order from the Minister...
My last Letter to Congress, was on the Twenty seventh of last Month Since which an Account of the new Loan is received from London, and as this may perhaps afford to Congress the clearest Proof, of the Weakness of their Ennemies, it is of importance that it should be transmitted to them. Some Accounts Say the Loan is to be seven Millions, others Eight. The Conditions of the Loan are in...
The Melasses business would certainly have proved the source of continual disputes, if it had not been altered; but the mischief which might have been expected from that is beyond doubt comparison less than what is pointed out in my letter to Mr. Lee of 18th. May. My apprehensions on this subject were communicated to the Commissioners at this Court; but I am sorry to say that they made no...
270Editorial Note (Adams Papers)
Of the eleven states that adopted constitutions during the Revolutionary period, Massachusetts, ratifying its document in 1780, was the last. (Connecticut and Rhode Island, both with corporate charters that granted broad autonomous powers, did not revise their organic law until the nineteenth century.) The General Court had drafted a constitution which it presented to the towns in 1778, but...