Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Adams, John" AND Volume="Adams-06-08"
Results 1-30 of 130 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Since I wrote you in January, I have not been favour’d with a line from you. Since I heard of the change which lately took place in the Administration of our Affairs at this Court, I took the liberty to address Doctor Franklin, on the Subject of my last Letter to you. Having a large Ship now here, which I want to ballast with Salt, but can not unless furnish’d with an order from the Minister...
Mr. Vernon Junr. having obtained a knowledge of the French Language sufficient to introduce him into a Compting House he is return’d to Bordeaux. I have taken him to my Lodgings but my concerns not being sufficiently extensive and varied as to give him the knowledge it will be his Interest to acquire I propose engaging some House of distinguish’d Character to take him into their Compting House...
I am Honourd with your Much Esteem’d Letter of the 24th, Nov. Since Which Should have had the Pleasure of Addressing you My Respects often but Was by the loss of a Vessel Unexpectedly Called to one of the Out Ports on this Coast Where I have been Kept more than two Months without being Able in that time to write to My House More than once on Account of the Very bad Convayance for Letters thro’...
I have had the honour of your favour of the 1st Instant, and recollect with pleasure, the social hours we passed together at Genl. Whipple’s. Indeed it would not be an easy matter for me to forget a person, in my estimation, of your consequence; and am very happy to find the acquaintance that commenc’d there, is likely to be increased, by the honor and satisfaction of your Company as...
I Hope this will meet you in good Health at Nantes and that you will find every thing there Agreable to your Wishes. By the Mail from England we learn Lord Norths Plan for raising the Money already voted. 1stly. a Surcharge of 5 per Cent on the Amount of all the Articles of the Duties of Excise and Customs, except, Beer, Soap, Candles and Hides *2dly. 9d. per Stage for last Horse in Post...
I have the Honour to inclose to you some News Papers which contain all the material News you could hear, if yet at Passy. There have been great Troubles in our Opera; But as you were not an Amateur I shall not trouble you with a Relation of ’em. You must have now more entertaining Novelties at Nantes. I Shall take the Liberty to send you every Week, the news Papers, till your Departure which I...
Yesterday’s advices from England inform us, that Gen. Lincoln was collecting an Army in S. Carolina to meet the Invaders, and that Prévot was to be re-inforcd from N. York; so that it looks as if the War woud be transferd to the Southward. The English loan rises rapidly in its value, as appears by the Omnium, which in a few days mounted from 4 PCt. to 6½. Besides this our Enemies will...
I was favoured yesterday with your Letter of 12th and congratulate you on your safe arrival at Nantes. Accept of my thanks for the trouble you have taken in delivering my Letters into the care of Mr. Cumming, Mr. Ingraham, and Mr. Ridley. You say nothing of the Letter, and the two packets of Newspapers addressed to Mr. Lloyd; as I have not received a Letter from him, for the last three, or...
I have not written to you since your Departure because I have not before had anything to communicate, and now it is probable you will have already heard what I have to say. The last accounts from England inform us that Pondicherry and Chandanargor in the East Indies are taken by the English, after above two months Seige. The Papers say also that a french Man of War and a Frigate are lost on...
I receivd your favor by Mr. Blodget and thank you. It seems uncertain where or how this will find you, therefore I shall not enclose the Cypher. When I know where a private hand may find you, I will send it so as to be secure. A person is nominated to take the place of the great man at Philada. who will leave it upon his arrival. You will probably get thither before him. We have no other local...
I am favoured with your kind Letter of the 26 Instant and return you my sincere thanks for the good Councils and assistance you have given Cap Landais persuaded how conducive this will be to forward his departure. I send an Express to inform that the Milford the british Ship proposed for the Exchange of Prisoners is just arrived in our River with ninety Seven Americans and to direct if you...
I received the Letter you did me the honour to write to me of the 24th past. I am glad you have been at Brest, as your Presence there has contributed to expedite the Operations of Capt. Landais in Refitting his Ship. I think with you, that more has been made of the Conspiracy than was necessary; but that it would have been well if some of the most guilty could have received a proper...
Monsieur Le Cte. D’orvilliers m’a renvoyé la lettre que vous lui avez ecrite au Sujet des Matelots Américains qui peuvent Se trouver à bord du Vaisseau le fier Rodrigue. Empressé d’aller au devant de tout cequi peut concerner le Service des Etats unis de L’Amérique, et particulierement de cequi peut être agréable à Votre Excellence, j’ai Sur le champ marqué au Capitaine du Vaisseau Le fier...
The Count Dorvilliers has sent me the Letter you wrote him concerning the American sailors that are on board the fier Rodrigue. Always desirous to render every service, that depends upon myself, to the United states, and more so in what may be agreeable to your Excellency I immediately ordered the Cap of said Vessel, to deliver these Men to Mr. Landais. The Cap whose Crew is very week,...
Your Flattery has effectually ingaged me in your Correspondence, for when my Services in writing can at any time amuse or inform you, You may assure your self I shall most cordially become your Volentier. Commodore Manly as he is called is again taken in the Cumberland by the Pomona Frigate Capt. Waldergrave. Compte De Stang sailed the 12 of Jany from Martinique and Byron from St. Lucie. They...
I did myself the honor of writing to you a few Days since. Last Night I received yours of the 31st past. I am glad to hear the Ship is so far in order. As to the Discontents you find among the Officers and People, it is impossible for me at this Distance to judge of them, or of the means of removing them: I must therefore, as in my last, refer to your Judgment whatever you may think for the...
I beg leave of applying to you in an instance where I am much Concern’d. The Case I shall lay before you, and Reccommend to your good Care. There is an officer in Paris Whom I want to send over to America on Board the Alliance, and whom I know would be of some use in the American Army. For that Reason Besides this of Reccommendations I have a great Regard for, I wish the Gentlemen Might find a...
The preceeding is copy of my last, of the 17th. Decr. by the Alliance Frigate, who sail’d the 14th. Janry. I hope she is safly arrived with you? I have your esteemed favor of the 2nd. Decr. by which I find my Son, is happily situated at Montauban, with Mr. Revallat aine, a Gentleman of good Character, with whom he will have opportunity of acquireing many advantages. It gives me real Pleasure...
I inclose you some news-Papers and a Letter which I am desired to forward, by Mess. Salucci Merchants at Leghorn, who have sent a Ship to America, having a Mind to open a Trade between the United States and Italy. The Letter is directed to the Commander of their Ship. The Abbés de Chalut and Arnouts desire me to present you their Compliments. I think you are expecting daily to sail, and hoping...
Pardon me for not forwarding you the two inclos’d introductory Letters sooner but I was in hopes of readily accomplishing my business here thus expected the pleasure of delivring them to you. Hitherto I have received no possitive Answer, tho Mr. de Sartine has repeatedly favour’d me with opportunitys of Stating my Demands to him and Yesterday promis’d me A reply to my sundry Requests next...
I am favoured with your Letter of 12th, and am sorry to find that you have had so much trouble about the Frigate. The accounts which we had of the small number of hands she had, made it probable that she would not sail soon. Perhaps this detention may prove to be “all for the best.” Some wise people are of opinion that this is always the case; and though the maxim has undergone the criticism...
The Officers of the Alliance having express’d some discontent at my offering them two Months advance out of which they were to furnish themselves the Cloaths they would think fit, and his Excellency B Franklin having directed me in any such difficulties to apply to you I will take it as a particular favor if you will be kind enough to let me know your opinion on that subject that I may act in...
I am honoured with your Excellency’s Letter of the 15 Instant with a List inclosed of several Articles to be bought for your worthy famely. Msr. S—— is actually making those purchases and as soon as they are ready I will see them neatly packed and send them on board by some safe conveyance. Inclosed a Letter received by this morning Post which I send you agreable to your order. I am much...
By the enclosed Letter from M. De Sartine expressing his Majestys Desire that the Alliance should be retained here a little longer, you will see that I am under a kind of Necessity of disappointing you in your Intentions of making your Passage immediately in that Vessel; which would be more unpleasing to me but for these Considerations, that possibly it may be safer for you to go in a Ship...
I am informed by a Letter from Nantes that the Alliance arrived there the 18th, and that she had 250 Men on board; she will therefore probably sail soon. My first Letter to you after your departure from hence desired that you would put the Letters addressed to the Committee, and to the Delegates from the State of South Carolina on board of some vessel that would sail before the Alliance. Your...
Philadelphia, 24 April 1779. Dft ( ViU : Lee Papers). printed : The Letters of Richard Henry Lee , ed. James Ballagh, 2 vols., N.Y., 1914 (repr. N.Y., 1970), 2:46–49. Given its date and its existence only in draft, this reply to John Adams’ letter of 5 Aug. 1778 (vol. 6:350–352) probably never reached him. Lee commended Adams for his determination to remain outside the quarrels of the...
I am sorry this Town has fewer Charms for you than a Ship of War,— You surely will have enough of the Sea on your Passage and methinks the Shore, now Nature is putting on her most agreeable Dress, is capable of giving you more pleasure. If you think the Situation of my House pleasant enough, you may be as compleatly Commander of it as you can be of any Frigate in the Service. You may remember...
I am greatly obliged to You for your favor of the 13 Instant. I am flattered much to find, that my Sentiments meet with your Approbation, the great Part you have taken in the American Question, and your Judgement in it, are such as give You a right to Influence and direct every One interested in the Event. Be Assured, Sir, it is my Inclination and Duty to Attend to whatever you may think...
As I have not been able to procure from Dr. Franklin his reasons in writing for disobeying the order of Congress of 7th May 1778, I have desired Mr. Lee to favour me with a Copy of his Minutes, respecting our conversation on that subject on 12th of January last. I enclose them for your perusal, and should be obliged to you if you would attest them. If you find any mistakes, or omissions, you...
I have the honor of sending you inclose a Letter received per this Morning’s post and altho I expect to have that of seeing you dayly I have thought proper to send it you per this conveyance as if you are on your way here that it can not miss you on the road. We have learnt that the french frigate the Surveillante has sent it in two English Privateers at L Orient and sunk three others. The...