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Desirous as I am of returning you my thanks for the very honorable proof you have given me of your esteem; I cannot wish that this may find you in Port. I am not under the least apprehensions of their succeeding for any time against us personally; but I am afraid they will injure the public and introduce a system of faction and corruption which it will be very difficult to change. For me the...
I inclose to you the decent Fashion in which we it was yesterday opinioned to let the World know Mr. Lee has a Successor. Pray strive by Mr. Issac Smith’s Knowledge of the Sailing of Vessels to let Arthur get the paper before his Foes. The 3 Ministers are to have per An: £2500 sterling. Their Secretaries £1000 in full of Services and Expences. To commence at Outset and finish in 3 months after...
I have written to Ostend for the two gazettes in question. In the meantime, I will continue, always as soon as possible, to lend you mine. I am very happy to hear that your son has returned in good health to Passy. Some day this spring you should send me him, together with Mr. Cooper’s grand child and your other son. I will show them Versailles and ensure they return satisfied. My son will be...
Philadelphia, 16 October 1779. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:183–184 . Like those for the peace treaty (calendared above), these instructions had been adopted on 14 August ( JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, Washington,...
By the enclosed Letter from M. De Sartine expressing his Majestys Desire that the Alliance should be retained here a little longer, you will see that I am under a kind of Necessity of disappointing you in your Intentions of making your Passage immediately in that Vessel; which would be more unpleasing to me but for these Considerations, that possibly it may be safer for you to go in a Ship...
You had an opportunity of seeing the commencement of this business of Jones and the Alliance, of which I enclose you the suite. Capt. Landais has been orderd from Amsterdam to Passy by Dr. Franklin where the Doctor, M. Chaumont and Dr. Bancroft have held a Court of Enquiry upon his conduct, and their report, I am told, is to be transmitted to Congress. In the mean time Jones has taken...
Hesitating to bother the Count de Vergennes, you have done me the honor of addressing me in order to determine what to think of the var­ ious rumors that the English have taken upon themselves to circulate. I am greatly flattered by this mark of confidence that you have had the goodness to bestow on me, but thought that I should place your letter before the minister. He has directed me to...
I had the honour of adressing your Excellency the 26th Ultimo advising that by the officious impertinence of the asesor to this Governour, I had been Arrested and my house Embargoed notwithstanding I had presented my Certifycate and Passport, given by the Plenipotenciarys of the united States Residing at Paris, and allso proved that I had always Subscribed a subject of those States, in the...
Philadelphia, 24 April 1779. Dft ( ViU : Lee Papers). printed : The Letters of Richard Henry Lee , ed. James Ballagh, 2 vols., N.Y., 1914 (repr. N.Y., 1970), 2:46–49. Given its date and its existence only in draft, this reply to John Adams’ letter of 5 Aug. 1778 (vol. 6:350–352) probably never reached him. Lee commended Adams for his determination to remain outside the quarrels of the...
I have the honor of sending you inclose a Letter received per this Morning’s post and altho I expect to have that of seeing you dayly I have thought proper to send it you per this conveyance as if you are on your way here that it can not miss you on the road. We have learnt that the french frigate the Surveillante has sent it in two English Privateers at L Orient and sunk three others. The...
I had the Pleasure of Addressing you the 5th Currente to Which Please be Referd and Since am Honour’d With your Truly Esteem’d Letter of the 31 ultimo and am Happy to Learn your Safe Arrival at Bordeaux on your Route to Paris. Your Thanks is Much more than an Equivilante for any Services I Wished to do you At Madrid. I onley Considred that as part of My duty, as well to Serve the united States...
I am Told that in the few Letters which have been received from you here you Complain greatly that your Friends dont write to you oftner, and that you seldom hear from America. I easily Conceive such A Situation painful, and have Contributed my Mite to prevent it by writeing by every good Opportunity and long Letters too, for I know that People in high Stations have their Curiosity as well as...
Mr. Vernon Junr. having obtained a knowledge of the French Language sufficient to introduce him into a Compting House he is return’d to Bordeaux. I have taken him to my Lodgings but my concerns not being sufficiently extensive and varied as to give him the knowledge it will be his Interest to acquire I propose engaging some House of distinguish’d Character to take him into their Compting House...
I begin to be very impatient at not hearing from you; and this not barely from the Number of days elapsed since my Information of Sepr. 28 &c. &c. but from the Opinion dropped by Mr. Lowell that we should not be able to obtain your Consent again to trust us here. It is the Desire of many that you should execute an intermediate Negociation with Holland, and you are named but others think it...
I am greatly obliged to You for your favor of the 13 Instant. I am flattered much to find, that my Sentiments meet with your Approbation, the great Part you have taken in the American Question, and your Judgement in it, are such as give You a right to Influence and direct every One interested in the Event. Be Assured, Sir, it is my Inclination and Duty to Attend to whatever you may think...
I cannot express the pleasure it gave me; when I heard of your Safe Arrival in Europe; permit me to congratulate you and myself thereon, and what is more our Country, whose true Interests I Know you have so much at heart. If I may trust the Common reports, you come in the Character of the blessed Peace Maker, who is always welcome to the Friends of Mankind; No one can wish you more success in...
Si je nay pas eu l’honneur de vous ecrire depuis mon arrivée a brest, c est que ayant scau su a la corogne que votre projet etoit d’aller a madrid, je vous crois tout au plus rendu soit a paris, soit a versailles, mais je prends un interest trop sincere et trop vif a votre santé a celle de vos chers enfants, de messieurs denas et allain pour ne pas vous en demander des nouvelles, en vous...
I gladly embrace the first opportunity I have had of writing to you since you left this Country. Mr. Jona. Loring Austin is the Bearer of this Letter. He is appoint ed by the General Assembly to negociate an Affair in Europe which will be communicated to you by a Letter written to you by the President of the Council and signd in their Name. The Measure is the favorite offspring of the House of...
D’après lespece de certitude que m’avoit donné monsieur allaine que j aurois Ihonneur et le plaisir de vous voir jeudy et de diner chez luy avec vous ce qui en grande partie m’a fait remercier monsieur déné a cambridge pour le même jour. Je me flattois de pouvoir prendre avec vous les arrangements qui vous eussent convenus pour votre embarquement qui reglera avec les vents notre depart. J...
Yesterday’s advices from England inform us, that Gen. Lincoln was collecting an Army in S. Carolina to meet the Invaders, and that Prévot was to be re-inforcd from N. York; so that it looks as if the War woud be transferd to the Southward. The English loan rises rapidly in its value, as appears by the Omnium, which in a few days mounted from 4 PCt. to 6½. Besides this our Enemies will...
Je me faisois une grande feste, samedy dernier, D’avoir Ihonneur de vous voir, de diner avec vous et de boire a votre santé chez monsieurs alain, mais 1’utilité de votre travail pour le bien public m’a fait supporter plus aisement cette privation, j eus cependant eté bien content de pouvoir vous parler moy même au sujet des besoins urgents ou commence a se trouver la fregatte du roy de france...
Permitt me to express how sorry I have been at not being able to comply sooner with your desires, relative to the Account of the United States, till the 11th of February, at which time the Intention of Congress was Known; Some of the Articles that were Kept in suspençe were the Obstacles that prevented it. I am however happy to find that the present Letter with the inclosed Account to that...
By a Letter from one of the most lovely of Women in your Quarter of the Continent, I find you are engaged about a governmental Constitution for Massachusetts Bay. And by another Letter from a Friend of a different Sex I find that, after a free and full Discussion of Principles you have determined to constitute a free Republick. From the unanimous Result of your past Deliberations I am led to...
Not knowing, my dear Sir, how certain Things now in agitation may this day be terminated here, I chuse to state, at this time, some Proceedings two days old, that I may not be thought to give them a Gloss in the Stile of an After-Prophet turned Historian or Painter. For a Ground Work I refer you to the Report of the Committee of 13 with its consequent Yeas and Nays, which is certainly now in...
I shall not look through my Almanac to see whether I have written to you 22 or 24 Letters, I shall go upon the easier task of acknowledging all I have had from you—Decr. 6 1778 received Feb. 16 1779 answered 17th. and Sepr. 26. 1778 received Mar 4 1779 answered Apr. 28th. 3 months ago Mr. Gerard communicated to us in a private audience that Spain was mediating and that we ought to take speedy...
The same Opinion of your Abilities and Zeal for our country which made me rejoice in your accepting of an embassy to France, leads me to rejoice with most of your countrymen in your Safe return to your native Shores. I am sure you cannot be idle nor unconcerned ’till the Vessel in which our All is embarked is safely moored. We stand in greater Need than ever of men of your principles. You may...
I thought that I should postpone answering the letter of 18 December, which Your Excellency did me the honor to send, until I could give you an account of the success of my efforts in the execution of your orders. I neglected nothing, but am mortified to find that all my pains have been insufficient and it has been impossible to prepare things as promptly as Your Excellency wished for his...
I Hope this will meet you in good Health at Nantes and that you will find every thing there Agreable to your Wishes. By the Mail from England we learn Lord Norths Plan for raising the Money already voted. 1stly. a Surcharge of 5 per Cent on the Amount of all the Articles of the Duties of Excise and Customs, except, Beer, Soap, Candles and Hides *2dly. 9d. per Stage for last Horse in Post...
I have the honour to transmit you herewith enclosed Two Commissions wherein you are Authorized and appointed Minister Plenipotentiary from these United States to Negotiate Treaties of Peace and Commerce with Great Brittain; Accompanied with instructions in each Case, for your government in the Execution of those Several Commissions. For your further Information and benefit, are enclosed Copies...
Monsieur Le Cte. D’orvilliers m’a renvoyé la lettre que vous lui avez ecrite au Sujet des Matelots Américains qui peuvent Se trouver à bord du Vaisseau le fier Rodrigue. Empressé d’aller au devant de tout cequi peut concerner le Service des Etats unis de L’Amérique, et particulierement de cequi peut être agréable à Votre Excellence, j’ai Sur le champ marqué au Capitaine du Vaisseau Le fier...