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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War" AND Volume="Adams-06-08"
Results 61-90 of 269 sorted by recipient
The Officers of the Alliance having express’d some discontent at my offering them two Months advance out of which they were to furnish themselves the Cloaths they would think fit, and his Excellency B Franklin having directed me in any such difficulties to apply to you I will take it as a particular favor if you will be kind enough to let me know your opinion on that subject that I may act in...
Invoice of Sundries shipp’d per the Phinix James Babson master for Newburyport on Account of the Honble. John Adams Esq. No. 1 a 2. I.A. 1. A Case containing 4. Dozn. of tumblers a 8. rials 48. 2. Do  Cups 8. do. 16. 48. 2. a Barrell 6. lb. Green tea a 60. rs. 360.
The Providence Frigate, and a Packet have been long held in readiness to proceed to France. The first is now ordered to Another Service and we have yet no Orders for the last. This is to go by A small private Vessel Accidentally met with. I dare say you Experience in Common with us the Inconveniencies of the little Intercourse between Europe and America, and wish with the same Anxiety to hear...
Accept of my thanks for your early and puntual Attention to my letter. I have ever thought myself honoured in your friendship, and shall be happy at all times in cultivating a correspondence with you. In your first letter you enquire after the state of our goverment. The best answer I can give to your Question, is that I am Afraid to commit my Opinion of men and measures in our state to...
J’ai écrit à Ostende pour les deux gazettes en question. En attendant je continuerai à vous en prêter des miennes, toujours le plutôt qu’il Sera possible. Je Suis charmé de Savoir que mr. votre fils est de retour en bonne Santé à Passy. Quelque jour de ce printems il faut que vous me l’envoyés avec Mr Cooper’s grand child , et mr. votre autre fils. Je leur ferai voir Versailles, et je ferai en...
Philadelphia, 16 October 1779. printed JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:181–183 . Although dated 16 October, the instructions had been adopted on 14 August ( JCC Worthington C. Ford and others, eds., Journals of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, Washington, 1904–1937; 34 vols. , 14:956–960)....
I am honoured with your Excellency’s Letter of the 15 Instant with a List inclosed of several Articles to be bought for your worthy famely. Msr. S—— is actually making those purchases and as soon as they are ready I will see them neatly packed and send them on board by some safe conveyance. Inclosed a Letter received by this morning Post which I send you agreable to your order. I am much...
Not a Line by yesterday’s Post from either you or Mr. Dana; nor indeed from any Person whatever in Massachusetts. The Principles of Equality in the Treaty between France and us being held up as a model for future Treaties may betray Negotiators into an Error; because tho’ the Equality in regard to France and America is conspicuous, yet Partiality to France compared with other Powers has been...
Vous avés craint d’importuner M. le Comte de Vergennes et vous m’avés fait l’honeur de vous addresser à moi pour savoir ce que vous devès penser de differens bruits que les anglois se sont attachés à répandre. Je suis infiniment flatté de la marque de confiance que vous avés bien voulu me donner mais j’ai cru devoir mettre votre lettre sous les yeux de ministre. Il m’a chargé de vous assurer...
Inclos’d is four letters which you was So obliging, as to tell Me you would take care of; the Letter for the Governor I will be thankfull to you, to deliver him, Should you have an opportunity Soon after your Arrival. The other three, to be put into the post office. I most Sincerely wish you, a Safe and happy passage to America, and there be the happy instrument of Relieving us, from Much...
I received your much esteem’d letter of the 22d. with the memorandums it inclosed of the articles you wish to send to Boston by the Alliance. Captain Jones, on my application to him to permit those goods to be loaded on his vessel, immediately consented and told me he wou’d write you by this post, in consequence of which I shall prepair them and distinguish the property as you direct. In Mrs....
I am informed by a Letter from Nantes that the Alliance arrived there the 18th, and that she had 250 Men on board; she will therefore probably sail soon. My first Letter to you after your departure from hence desired that you would put the Letters addressed to the Committee, and to the Delegates from the State of South Carolina on board of some vessel that would sail before the Alliance. Your...
As I have not been able to procure from Dr. Franklin his reasons in writing for disobeying the order of Congress of 7th May 1778, I have desired Mr. Lee to favour me with a Copy of his Minutes, respecting our conversation on that subject on 12th of January last. I enclose them for your perusal, and should be obliged to you if you would attest them. If you find any mistakes, or omissions, you...
When Individuals emerge from Difficulties, and by a happy turn of Fortune, suddenly find their Circumstances, not only bettered, but their future prospects very promising, the Gloom of Sorrow, which before clouded their Brows, is removed, and Joy and Gladness resume the place. Its thus with our Country at this happy Period. The Letter herewith, which is a Copy of my last, was a Representation...
Since I wrote you in January, I have not been favour’d with a line from you. Since I heard of the change which lately took place in the Administration of our Affairs at this Court, I took the liberty to address Doctor Franklin, on the Subject of my last Letter to you. Having a large Ship now here, which I want to ballast with Salt, but can not unless furnish’d with an order from the Minister...
I am sorry this Town has fewer Charms for you than a Ship of War,— You surely will have enough of the Sea on your Passage and methinks the Shore, now Nature is putting on her most agreeable Dress, is capable of giving you more pleasure. If you think the Situation of my House pleasant enough, you may be as compleatly Commander of it as you can be of any Frigate in the Service. You may remember...
Your Letter of 14th Instant from Nantes reached me to Day only. It was but very lately that I heared of your having left the Metropolis, and but now of your intentions of going to America. I have written to Doctor Franklin on the Subject you allude to, and have had the pleasure of an Answer from him, by which I perceive that at Paris they are not well acquainted with the Duties and imposts...
This Morning your Vigalent and invariable Friend wrote you a long letter which makes it unnecessary for me to take up my pen nor should I have done it by this opportunity but in Compliance with the Wishes of Him who is so partial as to think it in my power to Contribute to the Entertainment of a Gentleman who (from Interest, from Vanity and from more Noble principles) has such a Multitude of...
I am Honourd with your Much Esteem’d Letter of the 24th, Nov. Since Which Should have had the Pleasure of Addressing you My Respects often but Was by the loss of a Vessel Unexpectedly Called to one of the Out Ports on this Coast Where I have been Kept more than two Months without being Able in that time to write to My House More than once on Account of the Very bad Convayance for Letters thro’...
I cannot help troubling you with a second Answer to your letters on purpose to congratulate you upon the Success of your Schemes for prosecuting the war in the Southern states. Count D’Estang has done wonders. He will be acknowledged by posterity as one of the deliverers of our country. We have just heard that he is safely arrived with all the trophies of his American conquests off the Capes...
As I came but this morning from Versailles, it was not in my power sooner to answer to the letter you have honor’d me with, and this duty I now perform with the more pleasure that it is of some importance to the interests of America. Since the first day when I had the happiness of making myself, and of being considered in the World as an American, I have always observ’d that among so many ways...
If I have not had the honor of writing to you since my arrival at Brest it is because, having understood at La Coruña that your plan was to go to Madrid, I thought at the very most you would have arrived at Paris or Versailles. However, I take too strong and sincere an interest in your health, and that of your children and Messieurs Dana and Allen, not to ask you for news while reiterating my...
Your favor of Aug. 4 came yesterday to hand with the Pamphlets. If the Chevalier does not take his Bias at Bethlehem or Easton where he is to be documented 2 or 3 days, I shall continue in the hopes which your good Judgement has inspired. We have indeed had a stormy Time; and some Villains, I guess wanted to get hold of the Helm and the main Stays at a critical Moment. We are going to tell S...
Mr. Allen’s assurance that I would have the honor and pleasure of seeing and dining with you at his house on Thursday was my major reason for declining Mr. Dana’s invitation to Cambridge of the same day. I flattered myself that I would be able to make suitable arrangements with you for your embarkation which will, with the winds, govern our departure. I also would have liked to share with you...
J’ai crû devoir differer de repondre a la depeche que Vôtre Excellence m’a fait l’honneur de m’adresser le 18 du Courant jusqu’a ce que je pusse rendre compte de Succès de mes demarches pour l’execution de Ses ordres. Je n’ai rien negligé pour y parvenir, mais j’ai eu la mortification d’éprouver que tous mes soins n’ont pas été suffisants a cet égard et qu’il ne m’a pas été possible de faire...
I have had the honour of your favour of the 1st Instant, and recollect with pleasure, the social hours we passed together at Genl. Whipple’s. Indeed it would not be an easy matter for me to forget a person, in my estimation, of your consequence; and am very happy to find the acquaintance that commenc’d there, is likely to be increased, by the honor and satisfaction of your Company as...
I was favoured yesterday with your Letter of 12th and congratulate you on your safe arrival at Nantes. Accept of my thanks for the trouble you have taken in delivering my Letters into the care of Mr. Cumming, Mr. Ingraham, and Mr. Ridley. You say nothing of the Letter, and the two packets of Newspapers addressed to Mr. Lloyd; as I have not received a Letter from him, for the last three, or...
I was greatly looking forward to having the honor of seeing you, dining with you, and drinking to your health at Mr. Allen’s house last Saturday, but the usefulness of your work for the public good has allowed me to bear this deprivation more easily. And yet, I would have liked to have been able to speak with you personally about the urgent needs that are beginning to be felt by the frigate of...
You will confer on me a singular Obligation by favoring me with your Opinion and Advice respecting the unhappy misunderstanding which I am told prevails on board the Alliance. I ask your advice because, tho I am determined to preserve Order and Disciplin where I command, yet I wish to reprove with moderation and never to punish while there remains a good Alternative. It appears that there is a...
Having just heard of your being returned to Paris, I take the earliest opportunity to offer you my sincere congratulations on your safe arrival in Europe, and I flatter myself you left Mrs. Adams and Family perfectly well. On my departure from Paris you gave me a small commission to execute in this City, but your quitting that Metropolis almost as soon as I had reached London deprived me of...