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I have received your Billet of the 6. Feb. and altho I am much obliged by your Care to put me on my Guard, against dangerous Men: Yet I am extreamly Sorry to find, that Slander has been So successfull, as to impose upon you, who I know have no sinister Motive, nor any Thing to byass you; in this Case from the Truth and the Interest of a Country whose Welfare you wish. The “Freres” have been...
At Bayonne, I had the Honour of yours of the 25. Decr. last, which was delivered me by Mr. Dufour, whom you desired to assist me with whatever I should want particularly with Money. Mr. Dufour politely offered me, Supplies of Cash, and services of any sort in which he could be usefull to me, and I was very sorry that I could not have the Opportunity of forming an Acquaintance with him: but my...
A Day or two before my Embarkation at L’orient, Mr. Chaumont came to me and told me that he had shipped a Quantity of Tea, for Boston, and that he wished to lay out, the Proceeds of it, in Land, desired Permission to consign it to me and that I would, purchase Land for him with the Money. I told him that I was not a Merchant, and should not be likely to sell his Tea to Advantage, but that As I...
I am uncertain whether you said you should sett off for Philadelphia on Wednesday or Thursday, which obliges me to send an Express to Town to day as I fear you may be gone before I can get into Town tomorrow. The two Packetts in brown Paper contain all My Accounts and Vouchers, which I am ordered to transmit to the Navy Treasury Board, and I dare not trust them by an Hand less friendly and...
I have the Pleasure to congratulate you, on your glorious success Since I left you at L’orient, and upon your Return to that Place, from whence I wish you safe to America. I obtained Permission from the Navy Board to send some small Matters home by an American Frigate now and then, and I have mentioned it to Dr. Franklin who has no Objection. We married men who run away from our Wives and...
I thank you for your Favour of the 12 Oct. and for the Trouble you took in conveying my Accounts and Vouchers to the Treasury. I am too fond of the Approbation of my Country men, to refuse, or to hesitate about accepting an appointment made with So much Unanimity, after all the Contests about foreign affairs and I am too nearly of your Opinion in some other Points too. No Man knows better than...
I most sincerely congratulate You, on your happy Arrival in Europe, which must be the more agreeable to You, for the terrible Voyages You have had. Every good American in Europe I believe suffered a great Anxiety, from the Length of Time that passed between the day when it was known the Confederacy sailed, and the Time when the News arrived of your being at Cadiz. I too have had my Hair...
The Marquiss, who loves Us, will deliver You this. He will tell You every thing. Arbuthnot, Rodney and Walsingham are to be pitted against de la Motte Piquet, Guichen and Ternay in the West Indies. So that I hope, You will be pretty quiet. Prepare however to co-operate and rout them out of the Continent if possible. Above all let me beg of You to encourage Privateering. The French will be...
The United states of America to John Adams Cr Liv. By the Total of Monies received 28,355: 3: 3 The United states of America to John Adams Dr Liv. To the Total of my Expences 13,855: 16: 0 To twenty Month’s allowance at the Rate of 11,428 Livres per Annum 19,046: 0: 0 32901: 16: 0 28355:
Your Friend the Marquis, with whom I have sometimes had the Honour to drink your Health after that of General Washington, will deliver you this. His Love of Glory is not diminished, nor his affection for America, as you see by his Return. He has been indefatigable in endeavours to promote the Welfare and Comfort of our Army, as well as to support their Honour and Character, and has had success...
Paris, 19 February 1780. printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:250–251 . Responding to Vergennes’ letter of the 15th (calendared above), Adams sent copies of commissions, but balked at furnishing copies of his instructions, which he thought Vergennes expected him to provide (see JA, Diary and...
La Coruña, Spain, 16 December 1779. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 231.; docketed: “No. 2 Letter from J. Adams Corunna Decr. 16. 1779 Read March 27. 1780.” LbC Adams Papers . LbC in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No. 2.” and “NB. Nos. 1 & 2 were sent by Captain Trask bound to Newbury Port from Corunna.” For a...
RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 295; docketed: “No. 11 J. Adams Esqr Feby. 29th. 1780 the Gazette mentioned, not inclosd. Read May 15th. requests the Constitutions of each State particularly Georgia & North Carolina.” LbC Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No. 11.” Responding to a request from Edmé Jacques Genet, John Adams asked for...
printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4:175–176 . John Adams, thanking La Luzerne for his letter of 29 Sept. (calendared above) congratulating him on his appointment as minister to negotiate the peace, confessed to some diffidence about his ability to undertake so difficult a task. He added,...
I thank you for your ready Answer to my Letter of the Sixteenth and for the Itinerary. After deliberating as maturely as I can, upon the Contents of your Letter of the 17th, I have concluded, to go to Madrid, and therefore request that you would hire a Coach of four Places, and a Cabriolet of two Places, and Mules for the other four Persons as soon as possible. If a Cabriolet cannot be had...
I should be obliged to you to let Mr. Franklin take a Copy of our Letter to the Comte De Vergennes, relative to sending a Naval Force to America. The original Draught you have, which I should be obliged to you to send to me at Nantes after Mr. Franklin has taken a Copy of it, as I have no Copy of it, at all. I am with great Respect, your humble servant RC ( MH-H : Lee Papers); docketed by...
Mr. Schweighauser of Nantes, who is a Native of Switzerland, observing me, as I was, one Day at his House, looking with some Attention, upon a Stamp, of the heroic Deed of William Tell, asked me to take a few of them to America, as a Present from him, which I agreed to do, with Pleasure. He, accordingly Sent, on Board the Frigate a Box, containing as he told me, one Stamp for each of the...
The United States of America have experienced so much Friendship from the French Court and Nation, and I have myself as their Representative heretofore received so many Civilities from many Gentlemen of your Nation, that those I had the Honour to receive from you at Ferrol and Corunna, Instances of Politeness and Attention from a french Gentleman were nothing new to me: But the particular...
I had the Honour of a Letter from, your Excellency at Nantes, but as I was setting off for this Place could not then acknowledge it. I Staid, no longer at Nantes, than just to look about me, before I determined to see Captain Landais, that I might know, the state and Prospects of his Frigate. As you was so good as to desire Mr. Schweighauser, to consult with me, and Mr. Schweighauser wrote to...
Bilbao, Spain, 16 January 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC No. 84, I, f. 234; docketed: “No. 3 Letter from John Adams Bilbao Jany 16 1780 Read April 7.” LbC Adams Papers . LbC in Thaxter’s hand Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15. Triplicate.”; by Thaxter: “No.3.” For a discussion of the presence of two Letterbook copies, see part 2 of the Introduction: “John Adams and his...
I had Yesterday the Honour of your Letter of the Seventh of this Month. I thank you, sir, for your obliging Congratulations on my Return to my Family and Country. The Reason why my Letters of the 27th of February and the 1st of March arrived so late, was, that they were delivered at the Time of their Date to Gentlemen, then bound to the seaport who expected to sail directly for America but...
I have this Moment the Honour of yours of 18. I am perfectly of your Opinion that We have yet a hard Battle to fight. The Struggle will yet be long, and painfull, and the Difficulty of it will arise from nothing more than the weak Disposition both in our Country men, as well as our Allies to think it will be short. Long before, this War began I expected, a severe Tryal: but I never foresaw so...
Yours of the 4. is before me. Mr. Dana, I think will accept. I have no personal Objection to either of the Gentlemen you mention. You know more of the political Character of one of them, than I do. With the other I never had any personal Misunderstanding. He has Abilities and he has had his Merit. But he has been in the Center of Disputes so much, that you must have learned perhaps more of his...
As the Alliance is bound to America, and probably will go to Boston, I wish to avail myself of the Opportunity to send a few Necessaries to my Family, and a black Coat or two to a few Parsons in my Neighbourhood, whose Salaries are so reduced by the Depreciation of our Paper Currency that they cannot afford to buy a black Coat nor a Band at home. I will inclose you the Minutes of the Things I...
Since my Arrival in this City, which was on the 9th. of this Month I had the Pleasure of your Letter concerning your Vessel which was sunk in the West Indies. I immediately waited on Dr. Franklin who informed me that he had received a similar Letter from you and in the Time of it applied to Court and obtained an order for your Compensation, which he transmitted to you, and which I hope you...
I have but just Time to inform you by the Return of our Guide, that We all arrived in safety and in rather better Health than When We took our Leave of you, at this Place, last night. After 8 or 9 Leagues of bad Way, We found the Roads excellent, and the Accommodations at the Taverns all the Way, very comfortable. I assure you We discovered two or three fine Chimneys, besides that which you...
Paris, 23 February 1780. RC in John Thaxter’s hand PCC , No. 84, I, f. 279; docketed: “No. 8 Feby. 23. 1780 Letter from J. Adams recd. Oct. 16. sends News Papers &c.” LbC Adams Papers ; notations: “Recd in Congress Oct. 15.”; by Thaxter: “No. 8.” and “In No. 8 were inclosed Triplicates of all the former Letters to Congress, and also a Copy of a Letter to the Marquiss de la Fayette, & his...
printed : JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams, ed. L. H. Butterfield and others, Cambridge, 1961; 4 vols. , 4: 178–180 ; illustration of the peace commission facing 4: 194 . Although both documents were dated 29 September, two days after Adams’ appointment as minister plenipotentiary to negotiate treaties of peace and commerce, their final form was not agreed to...
I have received your Letter of the 14 of August, and have the Pleasure in Answer to it, to inform you, that I Saw your son, Several Times in France, and in particular, Some time in the Month of February, or Beginning of March last, at Dr. Franklins House, consulting with him about Some of his Philosophical or mechanical Inventions or Projections. He was in good Health. I thank you, Sir, for...
Yours of Octr. 14, and 19, are received. The Exposé des Motifs, is indeed news to me. I dislike, the Experiment, as much as you, and am equally happy, the offer did not suc was rejected. Mr. Jay, will find no Embarrassment, I presume, for Spain has all along furnished Mr. Lee with Money, in very considerable sums, and will continue it, I doubt not to the Minister. But I shall have precarious...