You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Wood, James
  • Period

    • Revolutionary War

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 3

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Wood, James" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
Results 1-50 of 51 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have herewith troubled you with a Warrant for the purpose of reinlisting the Virginia Troops in your Brigade, and when you send it to the Paymaster Genl if you will direct the Officer who may carry it to call at Head Quarters, I will transmit you the necessary instructions or if an earlier opportunity offers I will do it then. I am Sir Yr Mo. Obet Servt p.s. Do not delay a moment in sending...
I received your favor of the 27th Instant and Memorandum by Genl Muhlenburg. I am sorry the recruiting business does not promise more success; but it is not to be wondered at, as there are such exorbitant bounties given for substitutes. I have never received any regular account of the Act you mention and of which you have transmitted a copy. If the Legislature have determined on the bounty...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] December 14, 1779 . Orders Wood to replace Colonel Theodorick Bland as officer in charge of Convention troops. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Wood was a colonel of the Eighth Virginia Regiment.
Colonel Bland having obtained permission to resign, and Congress having directed me to appoint a successor I am induced from a confidence in your judgment care and prudence to make choice of you for the purpose. You will therefore proceed as soon as you can possibly make it convenient to Charlotteville and take the command at that post. Col. Bland will communicate to you the instructions he...
A Doctr. John August Leonhard Kohly , chaplain to Brigadr. Specht’s regiment complains that a considerable sum of money is due to him from a German Doctor Smith who he says is a tavern keeper on the road to Richmond. As he cannot maintain an action for it I have recommended to him to call on Smith personally as the most likely way to sustain his right, and have referred him to you for leave....
This express brings some packets of letters for Generals Specht, Hamilton and Gall, which came by the Patsy, flag of truce, just arrived from New York with money and stores for the Convention Troops. You will please send on the Express to the first two named gentlemen. The flag is to go up the James River as far as she can. When her arrival there shall be notified to you, you will be pleased...
This express brings some packets of letters for Generals Specht, Hamilton and Gall, which came by the Patsy, flag of truce just arrived from New York with money and stores for the Convention troops. You will please to send on the express to the two first named gentlemen. The flag is to go as far up James river as she can. When her arrival there shall be notified to you, you will be pleased to...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] April 9, 1780 . Denies request of officers of Convention troops to spend the summer at Augusta and Berkeley in Virginia. Sends names of officers whose parole or exchange has been approved. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Wood of the Eighth Virginia Regiment was in charge of the Convention troops in Virginia.
I have duly received your favour of the 16th of March with its enclosures. The letters from General Hamilton have been sent in. There are such jealousies prevailing in the country against the British officers in captivity, and they really take so much pains whereever they go to debauch the minds of those they converse with and with so much success, that I do not think myself at liberty to...
I take up your letters of Apr. 12. and 23. to answer at this very late day, having never been able to get a council since the 7th. of April till four or five days ago, so that I was unable to give you an effective answer. The council think it better to leave to yourself altogether the enforcing the order you inclosed me and which I now return. They rather advise that it should not be printed,...
The progress of the enemy with a very considerable body of cavalry from South to North, tho’ not perfectly known, is yet reported here on such grounds as are thought sufficient to render it prudent to be on our guard. This has given occasion to the inclosed resolution of assembly for calling in all the absent officers and soldiers of the conventioners to the barracks, and the advice of council...
I have heard with real concern the sufferings of the guard and prisoners at your station, for want of provisions, and the more as it has been out of my power to afford relief. There is no exertion I would not put in practice, to help you. I am told the assembly are taking measures to enable us to carry on government: and I think that the late motions of the enemy begin already sensibly to...
The assembly (on your letter being laid before them) having taken off the restraint of their resolution leaves us free to follow our own judgment which coincides with yours as to the inexpediency of calling the officers to the barracks. This measure may therefore be dispensed with, and the rather as no intelligence gives reason to apprehend that the enemy have ventured to make them an object...
I inclose you a remission of the sentence against La Brune, also a letter to the Commissioners for carrying into execution the provision law in Albemarle directing them to send to the barracks their salt meats also. This with others to the six circumjacent counties of Amherst, Buckingham, Fluvanna, Louisa, Orange and Culpeper had been made out before the receipt of yours. The others are sent...
The multiplicity of business which happened to be on us when your express came has occasioned his being delayed‥‥ I enclose you letters to the commissioners of the circumjacent counties extending their powers to live cattle. It has been always necessary for the State and continent to lend interchangeably such articles as the one has and the other wants‥‥ You can readily conceive that in this...
Inclosed is a Copy of a relation given by a Mr Hoaksley Waggon Master Genl to the troops of Convention to Major Genl Phillips, respecting the treatment of those troops on the score of provision—The original of this paper has been transmitted to me by Sir Henry Clinton with a request that I would make enquiry into the matter. I am the more anxious to be fully informed upon this subject, as...
I am satisfied that in the midst of a campaign and while N. York may perhaps be the object, Genl. Washington would not permit a convention officer to pass from his camp to N. York; nor can I suppose it proper such a one should see his camp as he might find means of communicating with the enemy: but in this you will do as you please. I see no objection to General Hamilton’s sending an express,...
I inclose you a duplicate of a Letter to Evan Baker to furnish supplies to your post, which perhaps you have an opportunity of forwarding, also Letters extending the powers of the commissioners of the provision law for the counties of Albemarle, Orange, Culpepper, Louisa, Fluvanna, Buckingham, and Amherst to wheat and flour of the present crop, and of those for the counties of Bedford,...
Mr. Tate informs me you are now in condition to pay up the arrearages of animal food due the convention troops, but that he supposed they would not receive them. If you be really in such condition I should be glad to have the arrearages tendered, and if refused a proper certificate of the fact, that I may transmit it to General Washington and prevent any disagreable consequences from the...
I am sorry the supplies of provision to the troops have been less plentiful than Mr. Tate represented them, and am only to ask the tender I mentioned when the condition of your stores will admit of it. There is no probability of a supply of money to your purchasing commissary till the meeting of assembly. I have forwarded your letters to Genl. Washington and inattentively sent also the packet...
I received a Letter from General Gates on the 14th. Sept. communicating Intelligence which he had received of a design meditated by the Enemy to make a lodgement at Portsmouth in this State. Tho’ I thought it very improbable under the then existing Circumstances it was yet my duty to communicate it to Congress and apprise them of our general Situation. In my Letter was this paragraph. ‘another...
Mr. Martin receives body shirts and hunting shirts for the regiment of guards, clothing for the officers, and some for yourself. Your portion being not equal to what you expected it becomes my duty to explain it. On the discontinuance of the board of War the Executive finding that the method which had been followed of issuing individual orders for clothing had produced great inequality they...
I have received your favors of the 25th Augt and 21st of September. I am pleased to find by the last, that your supplies had been more regular for some time, and that you had prospects of keeping them up—I never entertained the least doubt of your care and attention to the business committed to your charge, or supposed that the distresses of the troops of Conventions on the score of provision...
Baker was to give notice to Colo. Crockett when he should have ready subsistence and pack horses for him. Colo. Matthew’s Suggestions as to the Militia shall be submitted to the Council, and the result communicated to Colo Crockett. I am sorry to hear that your Supplies of Provision are still precarious. Mr Divers has made a Proposition to victual the troops on contract, which we think to...
Your letters of the 11th. and 14th. inst. are now before me. I inclose you four blank powers to be directed to any person or persons you shall think proper for Green briar or any other county. I am informed beef may be had in Frederic and Hampshire. I am only to desire that when you fill up any of these powers you immediately communicate to me the name of the county and persons inserted...
Certain information being received of the arrival of an enemy’s fleet in the bay, it is thought expedient to decline for a time at least the sending Colo. Crocketts battalion to the Westward, as it is possible their services may be wanting elsewhere. Be pleas’d therefore to forward the inclosed to Mr. Madison requiring him to bring the beaves he had collected for that battalion to the...
The Enemy invading us appearing now to be in force the Executive have determined that the Convention Troops be removed without delay. You will therefore take immediate measures for their removal to fort Frederick as directed by the Board of War. Previous to the publication of this measure another is expedient: The Regiment of Guards you know is enlisted to serve only till the departure of...
My letter by Cap. Read which could not be come to hand when yours of the 26th came away will have answered beforehand the several matters stated in that except as to the division of the Convention troops into three parts. This I apprehend is contrary to the Convention, and I should expect would render their government and safe custody more difficult. My last intelligence is that the troops who...
Major General Phillips has informed me that Sir Henry Clinton has consented to the exchange of Brigadiers General Spetch and de Gall with the officers of their suite and their attendants—I have acceded to this proposal, You will therefore immediately permit those General officers with their families to repair to Elizabeth Town, by the Route of Lancaster—Reading—and Easton, avoiding any...
No movement of the enemy since my last has contributed in the least to declare their object. They have left the north side of James river, and taken possession of the Country on the south side as far up as Suffolk. Still we are told they keep a considerable part of their troops on board their Ships. They are making great collections of horses to mount their men on, and taking possession of all...
Your representation on the want of barracks at Fort Frederick has been again the subject of consideration with the board, together with a Letter from Govr. Lee informing me it is not in their power to make more than a partial provision for the Subsistence of the Convention troops. Our apprehensions as to desertion to the enemy and corresponding with the disaffected arise from the British...
Your Letters of the third and fifth instant are now before me. My last to you which you could not have received on the fifth will I think have anticipated some parts of these letters. The terms of the Officers paroles, being that they will not say or do any thing to the prejudice of the united States while they are under the convention of Saratoga, and that they will remain within certain...
We think with you that the Germans you have furloughed to Augusta Rockingham &c. may be permitted to remain. My opinion of Pastor Kohlé is the same with yours, that is that he is more American than British. He never wrote a letter to me which could be exceptionable to me. I beleive that with a proper opportunity for explanations he might be rendered useful. I am with great [estee]m Dr Sir Your...
The inclosed contains a Return of a number of the Officers of the Convention troops, British and German, whose exchanges have been agreed upon at a late meeting of the respective Commissaries of Prisoners. You will therefore be pleased to permit them to come immediately forward to Elizabeth town by the Route prescribed to Brigr Genl Spetch and de Gall. I am, &c. For the inclosed Return, see...
It will be inconvenient for you to go to Annapolis, yet if not very much so, we think it much more probable that you will get every thing properly settled by personal representations to the fountain of power, than on conferences with persons who might be substituted by them. The former could adapt their orders to actual circumstances, the latter would be bound by orders entered into without...
I shall be exceedingly glad to hear the British division is gone, as their presence gives uneasiness. I hope the waggons will come in as you expect. Your orders for receiving the forage of the Officers and repaying them specifically are approved as being perfectly just. We wish in every possible circumstance to lighten the inconveniences which will attend their removal, a measure which we...
Your Dragoon did not get here till last night. I this day submitted the matter as to the horses of the exchanged officers to the House of Delegates informing them that I had no doubt but Genl. Washington would take the proper measures as to those purchased since the Convention, but as an express was this day setting out with dispatches to him, I would mention the matter to him specially unless...
I have to request you will be pleased to give the necessary directions for Capt. Sweatenham, and Leiut. Murray of the 9th British Regt to go on their Parole to New York; pointing out the same route as has been given to the Officers already sent thither on their Parole. I am Dear Sir Your Most Obedt Servt NN : Papers of George Washington.
I received your favour of the 7th instant from Annapolis and write an answer, tho I hardly know by what route to send it to you. The post at the barracks shall be duly attended to. I had a Letter from Colo. Taylor the other day when all was well and he mentions no apprehension of want. With respect to that part of the troops which are gone to Maryland we thought it right to lend all possible...
The Enemy having returned from this place and fallen down James River, and the German Prisoners being represented by you to be in a distressed situation for want of covering and food, you will be pleased to march them back again to the barracks in Albemarle. I am Sir Your very humbl. Servt., FC ( Vi ).
We have no board: the three Members present concur with me in opinion that it would be well to enlist as many of the Regiment of Guards as will engage for the War. The bounty is 2000 dollars. I cannot say whether the Money can shortly be furnished. FC ( Vi ).
The inclosed letters will sufficiently explain to you their object: I shall be much obliged to you to endeavour to negociate the purchase of bills therein proposed with all the expedition you can. It is natural to expect that the demand for such a sum will raise the exchange to a certain degree. We have no right to expect to force the ordinary course of things and must therefore submit to it....
I have laid before the Council the several Certificates you were pleased to inclose to me. They are very clear that an enlistment to serve untill the prisoners should be removed from Albermarle can by no fair construction be deemed at an end by any occasional crossing of the line with an intention to return. A man is not said to be removed from his residence by taking a journey from it. You...
I have just received information from Genl. Greene that Ld. Cornwallis, maddened by his losses at the Cowpens and George town has burnt his own waggons to enable himself to move with facility and has pressed forward as far as the Moravian towns, Genl. Greene being obliged to retire before him with an inferior force. We are endeavouring to gather a force around him from which I hope he will not...
Ld. Cornwallis’s approaches are so rapid that we know not where they will terminate. He was at Boyd’s ferry on the 14th. inst. Without arms as our Countrymen are there is no safety for the Convention troops but in their removal; you will therefore be pleased to remove them in the instant of receiving this, only allowing them time to pack their baggage that it may follow them in Waggons. As the...
We consent to the dividing the Germans between Winchester, Martinsburg and the Berkely springs till further orders as proposed by you. I must get the favor of you to know from Colo. Mingen what sum of money by the fortnight they will have occasion for, and it shall be sent either to the Barracks in Albermarle to any Agent whom they shall leave there to settle their affairs or to their new...
I inclose you a Copy [of a resolve] of Congress directing that the Convention prisoners shall be moved Northwardly by the way of Knowlands ferry. Their ultimate destination is Lancaster in Pensylvania. From Knowlands Ferry they are to be guarded and subsisted by the State of Maryland. I accordingly have apprized that State of their approach. You will be pleased to move them on immediately. I...
Since the Resolution of Congress relative to the removal of the Convention Troops they have been pleased to refer the Matter to this Board to take Order and we have given the enclosed Instructions to Col. Wood who has the Superintendance of those Troops and he is gone forward to put those Orders in Execution which are expressive of the sense of Congress on the Subject. The Instructions will...
I beg leave to transmit to you the inclosed information of George Twyman of Albemarle against Mr. Haw[kins] as a matter proper for you to subject to due enquiry. I am with much esteem Sir Your most obedt. servt, RC (Lloyd W. Smith, Madison, N.J., 1946); without indication of name of addressee, but it can be confidently ascribed to Wood both on the ground of provenance (the letter was sold...
I have to reply to your favor of the 2nd feby—With respect to the proposition of the Prisoners—tho’ in some instances it might be attended with advantage yet if once the precedent is established the applications of that nature will it is to be feared become general & that the far greatest part of them would have no other intention but to return to the Enemy especially the British; besides,...