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With real pleasure I received your kind letter of July 28th. though I received it but a few days ago. I thank you for introduceing to me Major Wolcott Huntington —whose appearance and manners do honor to both his names— I rejoice to hear that you enjoy so good health and I wish, that your Life may be prolonged for the Government of Connecticut as long as mine has been; which has been extended...
The necessity of purchasing a quantity of land, which I did not intend, in consequence of a mortgage that comprehended a tract I had before purchased, has so far disconcerted my pecuniary arrangements as to require that I should obtain some further Bank accommodations, instead of gradually extinguishing those I had already procured. It is therefore my wish to obtain from the Merchants Bank a...
I lately received a letter from you, transmitting a pamphlet. The latter, I have read with much pleasure. If party spirit admitted of candor, I should say that it was calculated to satisfy candid men of whatever party. Pains will be taken to disseminate it. You may remember that when you were last in this City, I spoke to you about some lands which I owned in the Ohio Company tracts. Inclosed...
When you were last in Town I promised to communicate to you the outline of a project by which I think you may enter upon a career of business beneficial to yourself and friends. My almost constant attendance at Court ever since you were here has retarded its communication, which I shall now make. Let a commercial Capital be formed to consist of 100 000 Dollars divided into shares of 1000...
Th: Jefferson requests the favor of Mr. Wolcott’s company to dinner the day after tomorrow at half after three oclock.— RC ( CtHi ); in Meriwether Lewis’s hand; at foot of text in Wolcott’s hand: “Answered—Mr Wolcott presents his respectful Compts. to the Pr. of the U.S. and will have the honour to dine with him tomorrow agreably to invitation. Monday Decr. 28. 1801”; with addition by Wolcott...
I send you some extracts from a pamphlet lately published, in reply to one written by a Gentleman of my acquaintance ( not by me as has been by some conjectured) from which I have taken out some leaves which I send you. At the request of this Gentleman I trouble you to give me some explanation respecting the suggestions which are made particularly in respect to Col Pickering, General Miller...
I have received your favor of the 28 of March and read it with much pleasure The information you have received from your Friends, concerning the Circumstances of your nomination to be a Judge of the Second Circuit of the United States, is very correct. I have never allowed myself to Speak much of the Gratitude due from the Public to Individuals for past services. But I have always wished that...
Your last letter, My Dear Sir, has given me great pain; not only because it informed me that the opinion in favour of Mr. Burr was increasing among the Fœderalists, but because it also told me that Mr. Sedgwick was one of its partizans. I have a letter from this Gentleman in which he expresses decidedly his preference of Mr. Jefferson. I hope you have been mistaken and that it is not possible...
[ New York, December 17, 1800. On December 25, 1800, Wolcott wrote to Hamilton : “I have recd. your favours of the 16th. & 17th.” Letter of December 17 not found. ]
It is now, my Dear Sir, ascertained that Jefferson or Burr will be President and it seems probable that they will come with equal votes to the House of Representatives. It is also circulated here that in this event the Fœderalists in Congress or some of them talk of preferring Burr. I trust New England at least will not so far lose its head as to fall into this snare. There is no doubt but...
I have received your Letter of the 8th. of this month; and am sorry to find that you judge it necessary to retire from office—Although I shall part with your services as Secretary of the Treasury, with reluctance and regret, I am nevertheless, sensible, that you are the best and the only judge of the expediency of your resignation.— If you persist in your resolution, your own time shall be...
The inclosed recommendation of Capt. Samuel Robinson to be keeper of the lighthouse on Wigwam point are from such authority & so decisive that I presume it will be unnecessary to look any further. With great esteem &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The enclosed letter from Mr Jackson in favor of Major James Gibbons came to me only last night. I inclose it to you that it may be filed with others though it is too late for the present appointment as I suppose. It may be of use another time With great respect &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The enclosed letter from Gen Lee recommending in very strong terms Mr King for collector in place of M Col Byrd came to me but yesterday, & consequently too late I suppose to answer any purpose, but to be filed with the rest & considered on some future occasion MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Enclosed is a Letter from Mr Daniel Bedinger, with a Certificate in his favour from Governor Wood. I Suppose the Letter comes too late but that if it had arrived earlier it would have made no Alteration in your Judgment or mine. Neither Mr Parker nor any other Person ever had authority from me to Say that any Mans political Creed, would be an insuperable Bar to promotion. No Such rule has ever...
I have carefully read all the applications & recommendations for the office of collector of Norfolk & although the list of candidates is numerous and their pretensions respectable I think I discover sufficient reasons in the papers to concur with you in opinion that Col William Davis ought to be appointed and pray you to send him a commission accordingly. His letters have a strong character of...
I have carefully read all the Applications and Recommendations for the Office of Collector of Norfolk: and altho the List of Candidates is numerous and their Pretensions respectable, I think I discern Sufficient reasons in the papers to concur with you in opinion that Col William Davis ought to be appointed and pray you to send him a Commission Accordingly. His Letters have a strong Character...
As I hinted to you some time since, I have drafted a letter which it is my wish to send to influential individuals in the New England States. I hope from it two advantages the promoting of Mr. Pinckney’s election and the vindication of ourselves. You may depend upon it a very serious impression has been made on the public mind by the partisans of Mr. Adams to our disadvantage; that the facts...
Enclosed is a letter from Mr William Channing from Tappahannock requesting to be made Collector of Norfolk in the place of Col Bird which you will be pleased to file & consider with all other applications for the same office With affectionate esteem &c. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have recd your favour of the 11th. I hope We have not made a mistake in Appointing Col. Hunnewell. On the Petition of Mrs Sylvester I am of the same opinion with you and your Colleagues. I had read with real Grief in the Papers, the account of the Death of Col. Otway Bird. The Character I read of him at the time of his appointment to the Collector, convinces me that the public has Sustained...
It is high time for me to request, that you would seriously revolve in your thoughts, the subject of communications, both of intelligence and advice, to be made to Congress, at the opening of the approaching session, and favor me with your sentiments upon the whole subject, as soon as possible. I shall leave this place on Monday the 13th of October. No letters should be directed to me here,...
Yesterday Mr. D Leonard Jarvis called on me to present me the inclosed letter from himself dated the 10th and the enclosed statement in print of the claim of the Rhode Island brigade. All the consolation I could give him, after reading over his representation with some care, was a promise to enclose it to you with my recommendation to you to give it a candid & impartial consideration & if you...
Enclosed is a letter from General Peleg Wadsworth of Portland, recommending Thomas Baker Wait to be surveyor & inspector in the place of James Lunt. You know as well as I the respectability of this recommendation With sincere regard &c MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The inclosed letter from Dr Bartleet of Charleston, offering himself a candidate for a medical appointment in case; I transmit to you, because I believe the law has committed the medical marine Establishment to your care. If I am mistaken in this, you will please to give this letter & its inclosures to Mr. Stoddert. Dr. Bartleet is as worthy & respectable character as any we have. Last night I...
In answer to your favor of August 27 I consent to the appointment of Edward Pennington to be first mate, Donard Rimbley to be second mate & Richard Hrabowski to be third mate of the Revenue Cutter on the South Carolina station. I return you all the papers inclosed in yours. Enclosed also is a letter from Paul Dudley Sargeant proposing to be Surveyor of Portland. Although this gentleman...
Enclosed is a letter from Mr. Sam Freeman of Falmouth, in favor of Mr. Joseph Titcomb, but although Mr. Freeman is a very respectable man, & I doubt not Mr. Titcomb is so too, I still am of opinion in favor of Col Hunnewell for the office of Surveyor, for reasons mentioned in a former letter I am with sincere esteem MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Inclosed is a letter from Mr. John C. Jones of Boston, recommending Capt Joseph Coffin Boyd, to fill the place of Col Lunt. Also a letter from Richard Hunnewell, requesting the office for himself. Thus you see we have an ample choice of candidates. Fosdick, Titcomb Mayo Boyd & Hunnewell, all well qualified & recommended by very respectable men. The last however appears to me to have the best...
Mrs Nabby Sylvester, the signer of the inclosed petition, came to me this morning to present it. She has the appearance of a virtuous & discreet woman. Left as she is with an helpless family of children, among whom is a pair of twins very young, she seems to me to be an object of compassion & of charity. I know not whether the law authorizes me to grant her request. The fine is yet in the...
The inclosed letter from Judge Bradbury, recommending Capt. Joseph Titcomb of Portland to be Surveyor in the place of Col Lunt deceased. I pray you to file with the testimonies in favor of Mr Fosdick, which I sent you yesterday & all others With high regard & MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Inclosed is a letter from Daniel Davis District Attorney for Maine Another from Woodbury Storer—another from the collector Mr. Nath. Fosdick in favor of Ebenezer Mayo to be Surveyor in place of Col Lunt deceased. I add a letter of Mr Smith. Which of the three candidates ought to have the preference Mayo, Titcomb or Fosdick is somewhat difficult to determine, as each has recommendation from...
Inclosed is a letter from Mr. Thatcher another from Mr. Parker & a certificate of a number of respectable men recommending Mr. James Fosdick of Portland to be Surveyor in the place of Col Lunt deceased. You will please to file these with all other papers you may receive relative to the same to the same subject & consider them all together. I know not that the circumstances of the relation...
[ New York, August 19, 1800. On September 3, 1800, Wolcott wrote to Hamilton : “I am favoured with your Letters of the 3d. and 19th.” Letter of August 19 not found. ]
I received but last night your favor of the 4th. The papers containing applications & recommendations for the collectorship of the port of Louisville in Kentucky I have read & agree with you that Mr James McConnel appears to be the person most suitable to receive the appointment to succeed Col. Richard Taylor resigned & you may send him a commission accordingly. I return all these papers &...
I received on Saturday night your favor of Aug 1st, & thank you for your care in transmitting the commission of Inspector, as well as that of Surveyor to Mr. Smith. I have signed the pardon of Slocum Fowler & return it to you with all the other papers inclosed. With great esteem. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
In Answer to your Letter of the 26 of July, I have to inform you that although you omitted to enclose to me the Letter from John Cowper Esq as you intended yet as there are no Candidates for the office, that I know of, who ought to excite any hestitation, I am well Satisfied that you Should apply to the Secretary of State for Commissions for Mr Claude Thompson to be Collector of the Customs...
The inclosed letter from Will Channing or Will Chowning I cannot determine which by the hand writing, is most proper to be referred to your consideration. He is or has been deputy collector of at Tappahannock. With sincere regard & MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have two days since written to Mr. Adams a respectful letter on the subject I heretofore mentioned to you. Occupations at Court prevented its being sooner done. But I wait with impatience for the statement of facts which you promised me. It is plain that unless we give our reasons in some form or other—Mr. Adam’s personal friends seconded by the Jacobins will completely run us down in the...
Inclosed is a Petition of Samuel Spring, for a Pardon, of the Crime of forging and passing Counterfeit Bills of the Bank of the United States. The Petition will be better placed among your files than mine: but the offence is of a nature so heinous that without your Advice I shall mitigate nothing of the Punishment. Col Smith writes that he has not received his Commission: I pray you to send it...
Have our party shewn that they possess the necessary skill and courage to deserve to be continued to govern? What have they done? They did not (with a few exceptions) knowing the disease , the man and his nature, meet it when it first appeared, like wise and resolute patriots: they tampered with it, and thought of palliations down to the last day of the late session of Congress. Nay their...
I send you the enclosed. If any good use can be made of it you will do it. I have been in Massachusettes, New Hampshire & Rhode Island. There is little doubt of Fœderal Electors in all. But there is considerable doubt of a perfect Union in favour of Pinckney. The leaders of the first class are generally right but those of the second class are too much disposed to be wrong. It is essential to...
Questions 1. Among the three Criminals under sentence of death is there any discrimination in the essential Circumstances of their Cases which would would justify a determination to pardon or reprieve one or two and execute the other? 2. Is the Execution of one or more, so indispensably demanded by public Justice and by the Security of the public Peace, that Mercy cannot be extended to all...
I thank you for your Report of the Sixteenth of this month, and for your early Attention to the important subject of the Loan. I have Subscribed, and Send you with this, an Authorization to borrow to the amount of the Law: but if the public Exigencies can be Satisfied with a part of it, your own public Spirit of Œconomy will induce you to confine your Self to Such part. The Rate of Interest is...
The President requests the several heads of Departments, to take the most prudent and economical arrangements, for the removal of the public offices, clerks, and papers, according to their own best judgment, as soon as may be convenient, in such manner that the public offices may be opened in the City of Washington for the despatch of business, by the 15th of June. Printed Source--George...
Permit me to recommend to your Civilities the Reverend Doctr. Enos Hitchcock, who is appointed a Deligate from this State Society to attend the Meeting of the Genl. Cincinnati to be held at Philadelphia on the first Monday in May next. He is a Gentleman of real merit—possessing all the requisites to render an acquaintance with him Valuable, and is a genuine Federalist—well attached to the...
According to what I mentioned when I had the honor of a conference with you on the subject of the 9000. Doll. due from the US. to mr Short for salary, I now inclose you the assumpsit of messrs. Pendleton and Lyons for the paiment of a sum of money due on a decree, which assumpsit was sent to me by mr Randolph, who stated the amount thus. the original debt £788. 5. 7 sterl. 20. years int. @ 5....
The papers from the Accountant of the War office, which accompany this, are referred by the President of the U:S to the Secretary of the Treasury for his opinion & report, concerning the proper course to be taken in these cases. The President refers a petition of Richard Graham for a pardon, to the Secretary of the Treasury for his opinion & report. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
By Some Accident or other the Original Papers concerning the Conspiracy against the Laws and the Beginnings of the late Insurrection in Pennsylvania were never laid before me. I believe they were transmitted to You by the Judge and the Marshall. How far it will be necessary to communicate the Facts, in detail to Congress you will be So good as to consider and I Should be obliged to you for...
I beg leave to solicit your Sentiments on the Communication of Information or Recommendations necessary or expedient to be made to Congress at their approaching session. Your Observations on the State of the Nation at large, the State of Europe, the Mission to France, the Rebellion in Pennsylvania the Negotiations with St. Domingo, the Interruption of the board or boards of Commissioners, and...
I return signed the commission to be filled with the name of Robert Pringle as recommended by you & Mr. Read. I will accquaint Gen. Lincoln that Ebenezer Skiff is appointed keeper of the light house at Gayhead. I hope to salute you not long after the 10th Oct MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I pray you to write me no letters to reach Quincy or Boston after the 29th. On next Monday sennight, I shall set out for Trenton and reach it at latest by the 15 of Oct. I also request that you would write to the Attorney Gen. & the American commissioners to meet us all at Trenton, at as early a day after the 15th as you shall judge proper. I also desire that all this may be kept as secret as...