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It appears to me material under our present prospects to complete the three frigates without delay. They may be useful with reference to the Algerines—they may be useful to convoy our vessels out of the reach of pickeroon privateers hovering on our Coast. I know you want money but could not the Merchants by secret movements be put in motion to make you a loan. I think something of this kind...
Your Letter of the 20th Instant with its enclosures was brought to Alexandria by the Post of Wednesday. I have no difficulty in deciding on the following appointments, & commissions may issue accordingly. Jonathan Jackson, to be Supervisor of Massachusetts; vice Nathal Gorham, deceased. John Brooks to take the place rendered vacant by the removal of Jona. Jackson—and Samuel Bradford, to be...
If in the opinion of Judges, it is thought best for my India wine to remain undisturbed where it now is, I am content it should remain there. I had, however, directed Mr Kitt (my household Steward) to learn when it would be ready for landing; and to have it brought up, and Stored in my own Cellar; where it would not only have been safe, but would also have remained undisturbed; which may not...
I learn from a Gentleman of character that a prize brought into Boston by a French Privateer is about to be sold. This being in direct breach of our Treaty with G Britain how does it happen? Though no particular law passed, the Treaty being the law of the land, Our custom houses can & ought to prevent the entry & sale of prizes, upon Executive instruction. If any thing is wanting to this end...
I have taken the liberty of putting two letters under cover to you; The one to Colo. Hamilton (in answer to that you forwarded to me) I pray you to put it under your cover, and send it on by the Post. The other for Mr Kitt (my household Steward) I leave open for your perusal, to save a repet it ion of the same sentiments, with respect to the money and Wine. With sincere esteem and regd I...
Your letter of the 28th Ulto with its enclosures, was received by the Mail on friday. I wanted no delay in the Commissioning of Mr Jno. Davis, to be Attorney for the District of Massachusetts; if to you, or those who were better acquainted with his professional knowledge (before he embarked in the Comptrollership) than I am, thought them competent to the duties thereof. That an entire Section...
Your private letter (without date) by the last Post, has been received. It is quite agreeable to me, that my Wine should remain in the Store of Messrs Willing & Francis, till I shall have occasion to remove it. There is little doubt, but the insertion in Browns Paper, of my sudden return, was put there to answer some insiduous purpose; for sure I am, nothing ever dropped from me to authorise...
When the letter herewith enclosed, dated the 4th instant was written in answer to yours of the 28th ulto; part of it, as you will perceive, was dictated under the impression of much hesitation & doubt; for I am not fond of rectifying Legislative mistakes by Executive Acts. I determined however to take the Attorney Generals opinion on the case: resolving, if it accorded with those which had...
I have had some conversation with some influential Members of the Bank of New York who are disposed to do all that shall be found possible. But I wish to know without exaggeration the least sum that will be a material relief to you & when & how the payments will be desired. Yrs. ALS , Connecticut Historical Society, Hartford. For an explanation of the contents of this letter, see H to Wolcott,...
I have just received your letter of the 6th. The idea of selling Bank Stock is the worst of all & can only be urged on a plan of private speculation. Acquiescence may tempt the Bank to oppress hereafter for speculation purposes. I have talked to some Directors of the Bank of New York conformably to your first suggestion, respecting the deposit of Stock & it will not be expedient to change...
Your Letter of the 5th instant came duly to hand. The preparatory arrangements for the sale of the Lands, remaining unsold, in the seven ranges of Townships in the No. Western territory being complete—I think from the accounts given of George Wallace, he would be a suitable character for the trust of superintending the sales at Pittsburgh in conjunction with the Governor or secretary of the...
The contract entered into between William Allibone, Superintendent of the Light House establishment for the Bay of Delaware, and Garret Hulsecamp, for placing and managing the floating Beacons & Buoys in the said Bay, of Delaware, is returned approved. It is to be presumed that these contracts are not more frequent than necessary; yet, as they are so often repeated; and are heavy in the...
The application for a loan from the Bank of New York though powerfully supported by some of the leading directors labours; owing to the jealousy & narrowness of certain ones who see in it a plan to increase the active capital of the Branch Bank & put them in its power. Unluckily the President suddenly went off to R Island with his wife & some sick Children. I pursue the affair & I hope still...
Let me request the favor of you to pay (out of the money I left in your hands) one hundred and thirty dollars to Mr Thos McEwen, agreeably to the direction contained in the enclosed letter from Colo. Wadsworth to me; and take his receipt for the same on the back of the letter. Colo. Wadsworth was obliging enough to offer me a Naraganset of his own breeding—which he thought would be fit for use...
By letter from Judge Addison of Pennsylvania, I am informed, that in behalf of Mr Ritchie, he has deposited in your hands on my Account—two hundred and ninety five dollars and a half. Let them remain there, if you please, until I arrive in Philadelphia; or may find occasion to call for them. Yours—sincerely Catalog--Paul C. Richards Autographs: Richards Collection.
I have not lost sight of the negotiation with the Bank though it labours & I have thought it best to let it lie bye till the President returns. Mc.Cormick is violent against it & plays on little jealousies, & what is still more efficacious private interests; representing the consequent inability of the Bank to accommodate the Merchants, many of whom from the unfortunate issue of some late...
Your letter of the 23d instant came to me by the last Post; and the letter therein alluded to, dated the 11th, was received in due course. The receipt of which I as certainly acknowledged, whatever may have become of it; but having kept no copy thereof, I am unable to repeat the contents. Sure I am, because I remember well, that an acknowledgment was given by the Post after it was received. I...
I had written you a short line previous to the Receipt of your letter of the 26th to which indeed I can add nothing material. It will, as things stand, be imprudent to push the point of a further loan till the President arrives —for though a majority of the Directors are well disposed to the thing, they are afraid of McCormick’s clamours and want the sanction of the President to controul &...
Mr Dandridge having rejoined my family again, preceeds me to Philadelphia, in order to bring up, & facilitate my Recording. He will ease you of the trouble of Supplying Mr Kitts weekly calls; by placing the money you have receivd on my private account, in his hands, & furnishing him with more, if necessary, on account of my compensation as formerly. With very great esteem & regard I am Dear...
I have received your letter of the 1st. I deplore the picture it gives and henceforth wish to forget there is a Bank or a Treasury in the U States, though I shall not forget my regard to individuals. I do not see one argument in any possible shape of the thing for the sale of Bank Stock or against that of the other stock, which does not apply vice versa & I shall consider it as one of the most...
The Bank of New York is willing to make the loan of 324 000 Dollars to you (I mean the exact sum of about this amount, if you desire it, which one of the laws you mentioned authorises to borrow) on these terms to advance all but two hundred thousand Dollars when you please—to advance the two hundred thousand Dollars, by way of reloan, when that sum, payable in October, becomes due. The term of...
Your letter of the 3d Instant did not get to my hands until the 8th. I most assuredly wrote the letter mentioned in my last; but I find it is no uncommon thing for my letters to miscarry. The originals to Genl Pinckney, of the Ulto (one of which containing 300 dollrs in Bank notes for the sufferers by fire in Charleston) had not been received by that Gentleman of the 26th of that month, altho’...
My Wants are So numerous and my means of Supplying them So moderate, that I am obliged to ask the favour of you, to direct a Post note to be Sent me for a Quarters Salary, as Soon after the fourth of September as possible. Mr Meredith at your Desire was So good as to Send me a Note for the last Quarter in good Season. We have the most tranquil Summer and most plentiful Season I ever knew. With...
Enclosed is the name, and description of the Girl I mentioned to you last night. She has been the particular attendent on Mrs Washington since she was ten years old; and was handy & useful to her, being perfect a Mistress of her needle. We have heard that she was seen in New York by someone who knew her, directly after she went off. And since by Miss Langden, in Portsmouth; who meeting her one...
I do myself the Honour to transmit a Copy of what I wrote on the 17th and must apologize for troubling you so soon again but I so sensibly feel the Insult endeavoured to be put on me by the Collector that I flatter myself I recd but appeal to what would be your own feelings on a similiar Occasion to be redressed and am with every sentiment of respect your most obedient Humble Servant DNA : RG...
Pay to Timothy Pickering, Secretary of State, Two thousand Dollars out of the Sum appropriated to defray the Contingent Charges of Government, to be applied by him to that use. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
Your letter of the 17th instant found me at Albany attending the Supreme Court. I have no copy of the Treaty with G B at hand, but I am well satisfied from memory that the true interpretation of that Treaty, enforcing in this respect the true Rule of neutrality, forbids our permitting the sale of a prize taken & brought in by a French National Ship, equally as if by a Privateer —and that the...
I wrote you a line from Albany expressing an opinion from Memory , that our Treaty with G B prohibitted the sale of prizes made by French National Ships. Being just returned to Town I have looked into the article which relates to the point & I fear that opinion was wrong. In a day or two I will write you more particularly. Adets late communication demands a very careful & well managed answer....
I have more carefully examined our Treaty with G Britain & I return to the opinion given you from Albany. My hesitation yesterday arose from the terms of the 24th article which were confined to privateers , a word that has an appropriate sense, meaning ships of private persons commissioned to cruise . But the following article contains the equivalent one to that with France, upon which we...
I received yesterday your letter of the 6th & immediately wrote some additional letters to the Eastward enforcing what I had before written. Pensylvania does not surprise me. I have reconsidered the opinion given to you on the 3d, & see no reason to change it. The reasoning which leads me to the conclusion has not been sufficiently explained. I will therefore be more particular. The articles...
I thank you for your Note sending me Adet’s letter. The present is in my opinion as critical a situation as our Government has been in—requiring all its prudence all its wisdom all its moderation, all its firmness. Though the thing is now passed, I do not think it useless to say to you that I was not well pleased with the Secretary of State’s answer to Adets note communicating the order...
The President of the Bank of New York called upon me yesterday and manifested considerable anxiety about the State of the Bank. It seems the course of things lately, and their large accommodation to the Government, have produced a heavy ballance against them in favor of the Office of Discount at this place, which has lately called for 100000 Ds in specie & it is apprehended may speedily call...
In obedience to the Resolutions of the Senate, passed on the 10th. of February and 16th. of March 1796, I have the honour to transmit herewith the following statements. 1st. A statement of the Tonnage of the ships and vessels employed in the Trade of the United States for the year preceding the first day of October 1795. distinguishing the Foreign from the Domestic Tonnage, and the quantity...
I did not understand by your letter of the 17th. of November whether you meant or not to authorise the immediate commencement of the sale of Stock. If you think this measure will become indispensable, it may be well to anticipate the execution; though indeed sales of Stock are at this juncture nearly impracticable. Yet I imagine it will be agreeable to the Bank to have permission to...
I wrote to you two days ago on the subject of obtaining an instruction from the Bank of the U States to the Direction of the Office here to prevent a speedy repetition of their call on the Bank of New York. This Bank has so large a proportion of its whole Capital in the power of the Office that if it be not tranquillized on the subject of demands from that quarter, it will be driven to such...
I received yesterday your’s by Post, which I communicated immediately to the Directors of both Banks, that is, so much as concerned each party. It has been very consolatory to the Bank of New York & will do good. All will be well. Mr. Alexander McComb applied, while I was in Office, respecting some land he & Edgar had purchased of the Public and on which they had made a partial payment which...
I groan My Dr. Sir at the disgraceful course of our affairs. I pity all those who are officially in their vortex. The behaviour of Congress in the present crisis is a new political phœnomenon. They must be severally arraigned before the Bar of the Public. How unfortunate that our friends suffer themselves by their passiveness to be confounded in the guilt. Yrs. truly ALS , Connecticut...
The President of the United States, requests The Secretary of State, The Secretary of the Treasury, The Secretary of War and the Attorney General of the United States to take into their Consideration and Make reports of their Opinions in writing 1st. Whether the refusal to receive Mr Pinckney and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the territory of the republic with such circumstances of...
Every one who can properly appreciate the situation of our Affairs at this moment, in all the extent of possible circumstances, must be extremely anxious for such a course of conduct in our Government which will unite the utmost prudence with energy. It has been a considerable time my wish that a Commission extraordinary Madison Pinkney Cabot should be constituted to go to France to explain...
I have received your letter of March 31. I hope nothing in my last was misunderstood. Could it be necessary I would assure you that no one has a stronger convinction than myself of the purity of the motives which direct your public Conduct or of the good sense and judgment by which it is guided. If I have a fear (you will excuse my frankness), it is lest the strength of your feelings, the...
The post of today brought me a letter from you. I am just informed that an order is come to the Custom House not to clear out any Vessel if armed , unless destined for the East Indies. Under the present circumstances I very much doubt the expediency of this measure. The excesses of France justify passiveness in the Government and its inability to protect the Merchants required that it should...
The President of the United States, requests the Secretary of the Treasury to take into his consideration the following Questions, and make report of his opinion in writing. Viz. 1st. Whether the refusal to receive Mr Pinckney and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the Territory of the Republic with Such circumstances of Indignity, Insult, and Hostility as we have been informed of are Bars to...
The President of the United States requests the Secretary of the Treasury, to commit to writing in detail, and report to the President as early as may be convenient, such Particulars as the Secretary may think necessary or K reliant to be inserted in the Presidents Spee c h at the opening of the ensuing Congress, under the heads 1. of Such Things as ought to be communicated to Congress...
The consideration for the candidates in the better part of the community stands nearly thus. Clarkeson , ver Plank , Fish = Walker , Burrall , Giles ,
My absence from New York to attend the Court here has put it out of my power to answer sooner your letter of the 13th instant. The characters which occur to me as proper to be considered for Collector are these— Benjamin Walker —This Gentleman you know as well as I do. He is every way qualified and fit, and had he remained in the place of naval officer he might, qualified as he is, have looked...
I thank you for the information contained in your letter of the 19th Ulto; and infer from it, with pleasure, that you must be better, if not quite recovered of the indisposition of which you complained, by your being enabled to write. To know this however would give me satisfaction as I entertain an affectionate regard for you. Various conjectures have been formed relatively to the causes...
I have received your letter of the 18th instant with its enclosures, and thank you for both. The President has, in my opinion, placed matters upon their true ground in his speech to Congress. The crisis calls for an unequivocal expression of the public mind, and the Speech will, mediately, or immediately, bring this about. Things ought not, indeed can not remain longer in their present state;...
You some time ago put a question to me, which through hurry, I never answered— viz whether there can be any distinction between the provision in the Treaty with Great Britain respecting British debts and that respecting spoliations , as to the power of the Commissioners to re judge the decisions of the Courts . I answer that I can discover none . I am of opinion however that in the exercise of...
Your favour of the 31st Ulto enclosing draughts on the Collector of the Port of Alexandria for Three thousand four hundred and sixty nine dollars & 20 cents, came to hand by the Post of Monday; and for so convenient and agreeable an accomodation, for the money received by you from Mr Ross on my account, I pray you to accept my best thanks. Enclosed is a receipt for the above Sum, with a...
I have received your two letters of the 6th & 7. The last announces to me no more than I feared. Nor do I believe any sufficient external impulse can be given to save us from disgrace . This however will be thought of. I regret that you appear remote from the idea of a house tax simply without combining the land. I do not differ from your general principle. The truth is a solid one, that the...