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We receive with pleasure your speech to the two Houses of Congress. In it we perceive renewed proofs of that vigilant and paternal concern for the prosperity, honor, and happiness of our country, which has uniformly distinguished your past administration. Our anxiety arising from the licentious and open resistance to the laws in the western counties of Pennsylvania, has been increased by the...
Address of the Senate of the United States to the President of the United States in answer to his Speech— We the Senate of the United States return our thanks for your Speech delivered to both Houses of Congress. The accession of the State of North Carolina to the Constitution of the United States gives us much pleasure; and we offer you our congratulations on that event, which at the same...
As Congress have authorized your Excellency to send a proper Officer to take the Command in the northern Department; We take the Liberty to signifie to your Excellency that in our Opinion, no Man will be more likely; to restore, Harmony, Order and Discipline, and retrieve our Affairs in that Quarter, than Majr. Genll. Gates. He has on Experience acquired the Confidence, and stands high in the...
I received, Yesterday the Letter you did me the Honor to write me on the 25th. of September. You request to be informed, whether my determination to reverse the order of the three Major Generals, is final.—and whether I mean to appoint another Adjutant General without your Concurrence.—I presume, that before this Day you have received Information, from the Secretary at War, that I some time...
Although I received the Honor of your Letter of the first of this month in its Season, I determined to postpone my Answer to it, till I had deliberated, on it, and the Letter from Barlow inclosed in it, as well as a multitude of other Letters and Documents official and unofficial, which relate to the Same Subject, and determined what Part to act. I Yesterday determined to nominate Mr Murray to...
It gives me the most sensible Pleasure to convey to you, by Order of Congress, the only Tribute, which a free People will ever consent to Pay; the Tribute of Thanks and Gratitude to their Friends and Benefactors. The disinterested and patriotic Principles which led you to the Field, have also led you to Glory: and it affords no little Consolation to your Countrymen to reflect, that, as a...
Since I had the honour of writing you I have been informed that about a year ago a workman in the sword manufactories at Sohlingen , a hilt founder by the name of Alte, was induced in consequence of the unsettled and distressed situation of that part of Germany to go to America and before he went had the Sword made according to his own fancy, with the intention as I understand of presenting it...
I received at Amsterdam on the 5th instt the Letter which you did me the honour to write me on the 12th of September, and immediately made enquiries to ascertain whether there was at Amsterdam a person by the name of Sollingen. I could trace no such person, but am informed that Sollingen near Dusseldorf in Germany is a place where there are noted manufactures of arms and sword-cutlery. I have...
I have the honor to enclose herewith, a letter from a young Gentleman who bears your name, and who flatters himself with being (though distantly) related to you. He is by birth an Hollander, but of a family originally English, which went over from England, and settled in the United Netherlands, sometime near the beginning of the present century. At the commencement of the present War, he...
I humbly Submit to your Excellency the inclos’d for your consideration, and, conscious as I am of the boldness of this Intrusion, I shall not add to my presumption by attempting an apology where none is adequate to the occasion. I shall only therefore observe, that my distress is occasioned by a late Severe ilness, to shake off the Effects of which, I am advis’d to have recourse to the Berkley...
I cannot resist the impulse of my feelings to express my grateful acknowledgment of the polite & kind reception wch I met with at Mount Vernon, and beg to assure thee that amongst the many whose curiousity, or admiration for the dignified character of the great proprietor of that seat of domestic felicity, lead to visit it, none can retain a deeper sense of the honor of having enjoy’d so happy...
I am dericted by Sir Edwd Newenham and Coll Wm Persse to forwd you the two Inclosd letters, with a Box of plants; which I have given Capn Dwyer of the Sarah of this port, wh I hope may goe safe. If yr Excelency may have any Commds for this part of the Country; I shou’d feel my self highly Honour’d in Executeing them; or If yr Excellency wd wish to have any thing sent out I wd with pleasure...
Your Excellencys Letter of the 25th instant to this Committee together with an extract from another of the 17th instant to the President of Congress has been duely considered by the Committee. Unfortunately the situation of our Frigates is such, as to afford no reason to expect that they can possibly be collected in Season to execute the plan proposed. The Providence of 32 Guns & the Ranger of...
It was not till the Begining of this Month that I had the Honor of receiving your Favor of the 22d of March, respecting a Proposition of Coll Baillie for opening a Road from Connecticutt River to Montreal. The President, soon after, laid before Congress your Letter of the 5th, a Paragraph of which referrs to the same Subject. The Resolution of Congress thereon has, I presume, before this Time...
I have the Honor to transmit to your Excellency the inclosd Address of the General Assembly of this Commonwealth and to assure your Excellency that with the most grateful remembrance of your generous and successful Exertions in securing and Establishing the Liberty & Independence of our Country. I am with sincere Esteem & affection Your Excellencys most Obedient & very humble Servt DLC :...
I had the Honor of receiving your Letter of the 29th of March directed to the Speaker of the House of Representatives and myself, which will be laid before the General Assembly at the next Meeting. In the meantime, give me Leave as an Individual to express to your Excellency the most lively feelings of Joy on so happy a Settlement of Peace—your Country will not fail to do Justice to your...
I have been Informd by My Mother and by some papers in my Custody find that my Grandfather’s Mother a young Widdow her name Broadhurst, Married a Gentleman Called Collonel Washington of Virginia, one of your Ancestors. if so I have the Honour of being a relation to you, which makes me take the Liberty to Trouble you with an Enquiry after an Estate which belonged to my Grandfather, and An...
In December 1771 I took the liberty to write to you requesting the Favour of you to Enquire After An Estate in Virginia that I had a right to not being favour’d with your Answer makes Me imagine my letter Miscarried. by some papers in my Custody I find my Great Grandfather (by my mothers side) Walter Broadhurst left a Widdow who married Mr John Washington of Westmoreland County I suppose an...
I have this day paid to Col. Pickering (Mr Wolcott being absent) Seventeen hundred dollars to be given to you as part of the instalment due on Matthew Ritchie’s bond. I had reason to expect to be able to pay the whole while here and as Mrs Addison wrote me that since I left home your letter requiring the payment had been received I was peculiarly anxious for a compleat compliance. I have...
Letter not found: from Alexander Addison, 21 Nov. 1798. GW wrote Addison on 6 Dec. 1798 that he had received “your favor of the 21st Ulto.”
I should have sooner informed you if I could have seen or ascertained what sum of money you might expect on the last instalment of your Bond on M. Ritchie. That instalment was $3116.40 of which sum I have this day paid into the Bank of Pennsylvania one half together with interest on that half from the first of last month making together $1568. The instalment due at June 1798 was $3292.80....
Supposing that you would be in Philadelphia when I should arrive here, Matthew Ritchie of the town of Washington in this state desired me to adjust the future payments and obtain the execution of a conveyance from you to him of the lands on Miller’s Run in Washington county in this state, sold to him by Mr Ross in your name. About two months ago a bill for 3000 dollars was sent down to Mr Ross...
I had the honour of yours of 9th ulto. I am perfectly satisfied with your demand of interest because though what is called compound interest is not recoverable in a Court of Justice I have always thought it ought to be. But as the interest of others was concerned I thought it my duty to submit it to your consideration and at the same time to be guided by your decision. I annex an account that...
Col. Matthew Ritchie who bought your land on Miller’s run in this county died nearly three months ago. His death will perhaps occasion some embarrassment in the next payment due to you. From various circumstances which I need not state the value or demand for lands is much reduced. He bought to sell again. Not one half has been sold for payments at different times and imperfectly made. I shall...
The other week the disputed line of the land you sold to Matthew Ritchie was run by Mr Morgan and another surveyor and settled by consent of Mr Reid who contended. There was very little difference between it and that last marked by Mr Morgan. An old line had been run probably a line of experiment and Reid had run his lines by it. The quantity may be considered as in Morgan’s survey. Some time...
I was yesterday honoured with yours of 8th current; and regret, that, having taken the proper measures for settling the business, which was the subject of it, you had the additional trouble of detailing them to me. I have this day paid to Mr Wolcott (as you directed) two hundred and ninety five dollars and a half; which I compute to be the interest on the whole money due you by Matthew...
I come to acquit myself of a duty very dear to my heart, I come to deposit in your hands and in the midst of a people justly renowned for their courage and their love of liberty, the symbol of the triumphs and of the enfranchisement of my nation. When she broke her chains, when she proclaimed the imprescriptible rights of man, when in a terrible war she sealed with her blood the covenant she...
The Memorial and Petition of John Adlum Most Respectfully Sheweth, That your Memorialist stands informed that an appointment of Agent for Indian affairs for the Northern department, is about to be made—And your Memorialist being well acquainted with the greatest part of the Country inhabited by the six nations, and personally known to many of the Chiefs of that people—and acustomed to their...
Tho’ an address, most respected Sir, to one in your exalted Station, to which a fictitious name is subscribed may seem altogether strange & uncommon, yet the Contents of this letter will I hope be a sufficient apology for its Author’s temerity, and, I flatter myself that a Man whose heart is ever alive to the calls of Humanity, will not deem it an impertinent intrusion. That I may not trespass...
I intend not either to deny or to assert for it will neither facilitate business nor alleviate Distress. The Subject of your Letter seems to turn upon two Points, viz: the Inconveniencies & distresses which the American Prisoners suffer from the Inadequacy of Room in the Prison Ships which occasion the Death of many of them as you are told. The other is that a Commissary General of Prisoners...