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As your Excellency has asked my Opinion of General Lees Plan, as explain’d in his Letter of the fifth instant, I think it my Duty to give it, although I am obliged to do it in more Haste than I could wish. I Suppose the only Questions which arise upon that Letter are whether the Plan is practicable; whether it is expedient; and whether it lies properly within your Excellencys Authority,...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble Opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an Association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
As Congress have authorized your Excellency to send a proper Officer to take the Command in the northern Department; We take the Liberty to signifie to your Excellency that in our Opinion, no Man will be more likely; to restore, Harmony, Order and Discipline, and retrieve our Affairs in that Quarter, than Majr. Genll. Gates. He has on Experience acquired the Confidence, and stands high in the...
Mr Mc Henry the Secretary at War, will have the honor to wait on you, in my behalf to impart to you a step I have ventured to take, & which I should have been happy to have communicated in person, if such a journey had been at this time in my power. As I said in a former letter, if it had been in my power to nominate you to be President of the United States, I should have done it, with less...
In Complyance with your Request, I have considered of what you proposed, and am obliged to give you my Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men, Such, whose Judgment and Integrity may be most relyed on. I mean the Committee on the State...
The inclosed letters are from two as respectable characters as any in Massachusetts, containing information which I hope has been transmitted to you, through other channels. But as it is possible, it may be otherwise, it is my duty to lay them before you, which I beg leave to do by the bearer Colo: Smith. With all possible deference and respect I have the honor to be, Sir your / most obedient,...
Although I received the Honor of your Letter of the first of this month in its Season, I determined to postpone my Answer to it, till I had deliberated, on it, and the Letter from Barlow inclosed in it, as well as a multitude of other Letters and Documents official and unofficial, which relate to the Same Subject, and determined what Part to act. I Yesterday determined to nominate Mr. Murray...
The inclosed Letters No. 6. 7 8 and 9, especially the last, contain Information of so much Importance that, although they are written in great confidential Freedom from a Son to a Father, I think it my Duty to transmit them to you. I beg the favour of having them returned to me at your Leisure by the Post. The unnatural Effervescence against the Treaty which broke out in Boston has made little...
The Vice President of the United States has the honour to present his humble opinion, on the Points proposed, for his consideration. 1. That an association with all kinds of company, and a total Seclusion from Society, are extreams, which, in the actual Circumstances of this Country, and under our form of Government, may be properly avoided. 2. The System of the President, will gradually...
In Complyance with your Request, I have considered of what you proposed, and am obliged to give you my Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men, Such, whose Judgment and Integrity may be most relyed on. I mean the Committee on the State...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
I received, yesterday the Letter you did me the Honor to write me on the 25th of September. You request to be informed, whether my determination to reverse the order of the three Major Generals, is final. and whether I mean to appoint another Adjutant General without your Concurrence. I presume, that before this Day you have received Information, from the Secretary at War, that I some time ago...
The inclosed Letters No. 6. 7. 8 and 9, especially the last, contain Information of so much Importance that, although they are written in great confidential Freedom from a Son to a Father, I think it my Duty to transmit them to you. I beg the favour of having them returned to me at your Leisure by the Post. The unnatural Effervescence against the Treaty which broke out in Boston has made...
The inclosed letters are from two as respectable characters as any in Massachusetts, containing information which I hope has been transmitted to you, through other channels. But as it is possible, it may be otherwise, it is my duty to lay them before you, which I beg leave to do by the bearer Colo: Smith. With all possible defference and respect I have the honor to be Sir your most obedient...
That New Orleans, and the Spanish Posts on the Missisippi, will be among the first attempts of the English, in case of a war with Spain, appears very probable: and that a combined operation from Detroit, would be convenient to that end cannot be doubted. The Consequences, on the western Settlements, on the commerce with the West Indies, and on the general Security and tranquility of the...
Captain John ⟨mutilated⟩ of Harvard in the Massachusetts, has been recommended to me, by So many respectable characters, and in Such handsome terms, that I cannot refuse his request of a Line to the President of the United States in his favour. He has the merit of long and early Services, though he is Said to have been lately unfortunate. As his application is entirely out of my Department,...
The Bearer of this Letter Francis Dana Esqr. of Cambridge, is a Gentleman of Family, Fortune and Education, returned in the last Packett from London where he has been about a Year. He has ever maintained an excellent Character in his Country, and a warm Friendship for the American Cause. He returns to share with his Friends in their Dangers, and their Triumphs. I have done myself the Honour to...
In Complyance with your Request We have considered of what you proposed to us, and are obliged to give you our Sentiments, very briefly, and in great Haste. In general, Sir, there will be three Committees, either of a Congress, or of an House of Representatives, which are and will be composed of our best Men; Such, whose Judgment and Integrity, may be most rely’d on; the Committee on the State...
We thank you, sir, for your faithful and detailed exposure of the existing situation of our country; and we sincerely join in sentiments of gratitude to an overruling Providence for the distinguished share of public prosperity and private happiness which the People of the United States so peculiarly enjoy. We are fully sensible of the advantages that have resulted from the adoption of measures...
At twelve o’clock the Senate attended upon the President of the United States at his own House, when the President of the Senate delivered the following Address. To the President of the United States of America. We receive, Sir, with particular satisfaction the communications contained in your Speech, which confirm to us the progressive State of the public Credit, and afford at the same time,...
The Senate of the United States have received with the highest satisfaction the assurance of public prosperity contained in your Speech to both Houses: the multiplied blessings of providence have not escaped our notice or failed to excite our gratitude. The benefits which flow from a restoration of public and private confidence are conspicuous and important and the pleasure with which we...
The Congress having thought proper to appoint us to the Board of War and Ordinance, we do ourselves the Honour to transmit you the foregoing Extracts from their Proceedings establishing a War Office for the more speedy and effectual Dispatch of military Business. You will percieve, on Perusal of the Extracts, that it will be necessary for you forthwith to furnish the Board with an exact State...
Mr McHenry, the Secretary at War, will have the Honor to wait on you, in my behalf, to impart to you a Step I have ventured to take, and which I should have been happy to have communicated in person, if such a journey had been, at this time, in my power. As I said in a former letter, if it had been in my power to nominate you to be President of the United States, I should have done it, with...
I have this morning received, with great Pleasure, the Letter you did me the Honor to write me, on the Seventeenth of this month. Although a Visit to the City of Washington would give me great Pleasure, and chiefly for the opportunity it would afford me of paying my Respects at Mount Vernon; Yet I cannot but consider the execution of the Plan, as very uncertain. I thank you, Sir, for your...
I have this morning received, with great Pleasure, the Letter you did me the Honor to write me, on the Seventeenth of this month. Although a Visit to the City of Washington would give me great Pleasure, and chiefly for the opportunity it would afford me of paying my Respects at Mount Vernon; yet I cannot but consider the execution of the Plan, as very uncertain. I thank you, Sir, for your...
According to appointment on Saturday, the Senate in a body waited upon the President at twelve Oclock, and the Vice President, delivered the following Address To the President of the United States. We thank you, Sir, for your faithful and detailed exposure of the existing situation of our Country; and we sincerely join in sentiments of gratitude to an overruling providence, for the...
We the Senate of the United States, return you our sincere thanks for your excellent speech delivered to both Houses of Congress; congratulate you on the compleat organization of the federal Government, and felicitate ourselves and our fellow-citizens on your elevation to the Office of President: an Office highly important by the Powers constitutionally annexed to it and extremely honorable...
At a meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking fund on the 26th day of December 1795; Present, The President of the Senate, The Secretary of State, The Secretary of the Treasury. A Report of the Secretary of the Treasury was read, as follows. “That to provide for the payment of the Interest on the public debt which will fall due at the close of the present year, it will be necessary to...
The Bearer of this Letter Francis Dana Esqr. of Cambridge, is a Gentleman of Family, Fortune and Education, returned in the last Packett from London where he has been about a Year. He has ever maintained an excellent Character in his Country, and a warm Friendship for the American Cause. He returns to share with his Friends in their Dangers, and their Triumphs. I have done myself the Honour to...