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I am fearfull you may have thought me unmindfull of my pleasing obligation to see you supply’d with Cod fish, but be assured I shall never be forgetfull of the honour and interest I feel in executing any commands you may ever impose—on my return from Congress in March I apply’d to Mr Daniel Sargent of Boston who is the most reputed person for procuring the best of fish who informed me it could...
The immediate publication of Govr Blount’s letter to Carey, after the receipt of the copy sent you by Colo. Henley seemed to render of little consequence this copy, which, however, I return, agreeably to your request on its transmission. To morrow I move my family and office to Trenton. Not that I think the danger of the contagious fever in any measure considerable: but persons are...
The receipt two days since of your letter of the 21 instant gave me sincere pleasure. The token of your regard, which it announces, is very precious to me, and will always be rememberd as it ought to be. Mrs. Hamilton has lately added another boy to our Stock. She and the Child are both well. She desires to be affectionately remembered to Mrs. Washington & yourself. We have nothing new here...
Your favour of the 26th Instant was handed me by Mr Anderson, but from the hurry of business which at that time demanded all my attention I was prevented from answering it untill now —For the Check on the Bank of Alexandria please to accept my warmest Acknowledgements the present of Turnips I receve also with Gratitude. In regard to my Account with you I find upon examination of my Book’s that...
The receipt two days since of your letter of the 21 instant gave me sincere pleasure. The token of your regard, which it announces, is very precious to me, and will always be remembered as it ought to be. Mrs Hamilton has lately added another boy to our Stock. She and the child are both well—She desires to be affectionately remembered to Mrs Washington & yourself. We have nothing new here more...
Having for some Time past had an Intention of going to America, which having been intimated to my good Friend Sir John Sinclair Bart, he desired me to write to you, by the first Conveyance to inform you; that he intended reccommending me to you, as an English Farmer, to take one of your Farms, on the Potomac, of which Farms he has sent me the Plans, Conditions &ca. Accordingly I take this the...
I have not time to pay my respects as I intended, in as much as I cannot leave town this evening & my long absence from home forbids my loosing another day. My demands on Philadelphia unless the yellow fever interrupts the Philadelphians will be settled in Septr. I then shall have some of Wilsons money, on which fund I counted when I bought yr land. I now enclose a negotiable note for 1000 Ds....
I have Receved your Letter of the 14th Instant—and I shall always be happy To have It in my Power to Serve you; but as yet, I have not been so fortunate as to Git an overseer for you, for those who would answer your purpose are so very high In thare demands In wages that they are far above what you are willing to Give, for the Lowest that I Can Git one who could be depended on for is £85 this...
Though I did myself the honour of writing very lately to you, the pleasing event of which a letter this morning from Hamburgh gives a prospect, induces me rather to trespass upon your patience than to omit for a moment the intelligence that there is every reason to expect the liberation of M. Fayette. I will extract part of Mr Williams’s (the Consul’s) letter of 22d Augt —he says that “Mr...
I have to-day delivered to the Attorney General, in one packet, the two bundles of papers of reports & opinions of the Heads of Departments &c. which you left in my hands. I have delivered him another packet from Sir John Sinclair, which I received to-day from General Kosciusko; and now inclose the General’s letter to you, with another which was under the ⟨string⟩ of the packet from Sir John...
Since I had the pleasure to see you, I have become engaged to be married to a young lady near Winchester. Her name is Wood. The daughter of Mr Robt Wood. She has been brought up in the habit of domestic œconomy & industry & to consider the true excellence of a farmers wife to consist in a minute attention to the œconomy of her family & a continued reguard to her husbands domestic interests....
Upon more particular Inquiry respecting the Cook of whom I was speaking to you, he is said to possess some ill qualities that might probably disqualify him for your Service; therefore it wou’d not be adviseable to calculate on getting him, if you can be otherwise supplied with a good Cook. My near neighbour Mr Robt Baylor (at whose house Mr Payton Gwynn, his master, stay’d, when up the...
Letter not found: George Washington Parke Custis to GW, 21 Aug. 1797. On 29 Aug. GW wrote “Your letter of the 21st Instt came to hand.”
Perhaps your Excellency will be disposed to pardon, & think it a laudable ambition, which has stimulated me to endeavor to make my publication appear worthy your patronage—The whole of the materials & execution of the edition of Telemachus, now presented you, are entire american, my mode of hot pressing is on an entire new principle from that practised in Europe —under these considerations I...
Agreable to your Exelencies ordre I have the honnour to informe you that I am rady to go into your service, and Dew not pretant to pointe out to you anny new Rouls, but will satisfay my self white the same apointements as your other Gardner Injoire now, only white that Tiferance, to Recive frome your Exelencies an Ecquivalent of the amaunte of seele mad Yearly which will not bee any more. I...
It gave me pleasure to be made the bearer of a volume of Reports from the British Board of Agriculture, to be presented to you on the part of the Board, and which was delivered to me for that purpose by Sir John Sinclair, with the enclosed letter—As it was only just finished at the Press when I left London, it was sent me in loose sheets which have been bound up here—Coll Innes who left town...
After messages without number, Mr Anthony has brought me your copying press with the new brass rollers, for which he has charged ten dollars more than he at first mentioned as the probable price. The reason he assigns, is the greater weight of brass, increasing the founders bill to twenty one dollars. I have paid him, and inclose his receipt for $35, after endeavouring to reduce his demand....
Since I had the pleasure of seeing you I have made enquiry for Rye & find no Quantity can be had at a reasonable Price our Farmers Ask one Dollar ⅌ Bushel & cannot engage to deliver it sooner than the Middle of October. I have therefore declined to make any engagements for it—I set out for the Allegany to day & will make one more ⟨ mutilated ⟩ to get you the Genuin Glade Oats. I am with Great...
The letter which accompanis this was wrote yesterday before your Cart had returned from Mr Gough’s. The Calf which was drove in from his House was so very much fatigued and his feet appeared so sore that I have recomme[n]ded it to Mr Anderson to give it one days rest, and its being in the same pasture with the other one will make them somewhat acquainted, and perhaps drive better together. The...
Letter not found: Clement Biddle to GW, 17 Aug. 1797. In his letter to Biddle of 23 Aug. GW refers to “your letter of the 17th instant.”
I had the Honor to receive this morning your Letter by Mr John Anderson. I wish it was in my power to send the Sheep you desire; some few years ago I took much Delight in that part of my Stock and brought it to great perfection, but they have unfortunately been since deseased and so much degenerated that I would not recommend their introduction on your Farm. I flatter myself that you will...
Your letter by Mr Anderson I received Yesterday Afternoon, before which I had sufficiently ascertained that the sheep you mentioned could be had of Mr Gough, Your Carriage therefore proceeded immediately on. Colo. Howard shewed me a letter a few days agoe in which Mr Gough expressed a wish to present you with one of his Bull Calves and requesting his advice as to the best mode of having it...
I was yesterday at the Great Falls, when Frederick informed me that he could calculate with certainty upon getting two hundred bushels of Rye, and perhaps more, from 4/6 to 5/ pr bushl. The farmers will begin to get it out in a few days, and as soon as there may be enough received to make it an object to send for it, he will give me information thereof. I am, my dear Sir, most respectfully &...
Since my return home I have seen charles Davis, The man that I had in view, to procure for you, as a Butler, and house keeper—he Tells me his Wages is raised from £50 to £90—so that my expectations is baffled as to him—I shall go to Town to morrow—and shall make application to another young man in the Same line of charles Davis; he is a neat decent young man—of Reputable parents—and I beleive...
Letter not found: Clement Biddle to GW, 12 Aug. 1797. On 21 Aug. GW wrote Biddle : “I have received your letter of the 12th.”
On the 9th I had the honor to receive your letter of the 4th instant, since which Col. Pickering has found the opinion which was the subject of my former letter; which will enable me to attain a copy without giving you any further trouble. If Col. Pickering has written to you as he intended he probably has informed you that the prospect of peace between France and Great Britain continues to...
Your letter of the 4th did not come to hand till this day. I lose no time to relieve you from your apprehensions relative to the papers in question. I have the two bundles you left with me; and among them I find the opinion of the Attorney General on Mr Monroe’s recall, of which I will let him take a copy; and then restore the original to its place. I will take a safe opportunity to convey the...
I put one of your letters for Mr King and the four before received (for Sr John Sinclair & others) on board a vessel bound to London, & which was to have sailed last Sunday or monday; but the continued rainy weather has detained her. Mr Monroe has anticipated me in furnishg you, by his publication in the news-papers, the correspondence between us on the subject of his demanding the reasons of...
The Bearer of this, is the Cook you wrote concerning —You are welcome to make such trial of him, as may be satisfactory to Mrs Washington & yourself—it will give me pleasure should he answer your wishes. I have spoken to Mr George Lee to mention your want of Rye to the farmers in our neighborhood tho I fear it will be hard to procure as the number of distilleries in the upper Country, give Rye...
I have the pleasure to inform you that the Calf you expected from the Eastern Shore arrived yesterday. It is a beautifull formed Animal and well grown Calf, but not near as large as some I have seen of Mr Gough’s raising at the same Age. It is said to be about five months old. The person who brought it over, says there was no particular pains taken with it, and that it had only the common fare...
Having been appointed administrator to the estate of Mrs Kirk deceased, relict of James Kirk esqr. late of this town, I am desirous of settling the accounts as speedily as possible. Mrs Kirk, before her death, informed me that a bond had been lodged with you to satisfy a debt due you from Mr Kirk’s estate, and that there is still a balance of said bond remaining in your hand. As I have not met...
I wrote to you by post on the 21t June last acknowledging the receipt of your favour of the 7th April, with the inclosures respecting a gardener, which I hope you have received. I have by the assistance of Mr Harper and Mr Foreman at last succeded in finding a Gardener for you whom I have engaged this day, and who will, I hope, afford you satisfaction. He will be the bearer of this. His name...
Having a Poetical turn from my youth, And having Wrote Some Rural, Romantic and, said to be pleasing Poems in Europe, for which got good Encouragement, And Revisiting this Country last year, form’d a Plan of Publishing by Subscription, some Essays of American Affairs, Previous to which (And your Resignation of the first Station on this Continent) I did my Self the Honor to wait on you Sir, at...
It is with pleasure I acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favour of the 23d instant, and must congratulate you on the enjoyment of your health, the preservation of which should allways be a principal aim in all men and I have no doubts that as long as you are able to take your accustomed exercise that you will enjoy perfect health. Mr Z. Lewis has kept up the correspondence I mentioned in...
I receivd a Letter from the Hon: James Ross dated at Philadelphia the 14th of Last month informing me that no money had been paid into the Bank of Pennsylvania, towards the Enstallment due to you the first of June Last, which gave me great pain, as I fully Expected the whole Sum was paid in, by a Mr Reuel Sayre & Isaac Sparks, Said Sayres, Brother & Sparks were in New Jersey and Engaged to pay...
I recd your kind Letter of the 12th Instant and am happy in having an opportunity to return to you my most sincere thanks for your offer of Assistance and for your good Advice, which I can Assure you was very Acceptable as there is no person fonder of receiving Advice than what I am. Your Observations respecting the borrowing of Money I have reason to Attend to. for a Considerable part of the...
I Gladly Embrace an Opportunity of writing to Your Excellency on a Subject of as Great Importance as any thing Ever yet Comprehended By Mortal Man That is the Glory of God & the Redemption & Salvation of mankind; I am A Union Minister. & I Do Sincerely Beleive that if all human Inventions was Laid Aside, that it would be Imposible that any more than one party Could Exist in the Church of...
In reply to your letr by your servt this evening, I can only say, that my recollection of the lands sold to you, authorizes me to consider every fair attempt to wrest your title to them as the result of error—In Kentucky, I am told, too often are efforts of another sort made to deprive real owners of their property. I know that all the money due on the purchase of the lands you hold thro me...
Letter not found: Clement Biddle to GW, 25 July 1797. On 14 Aug. GW wrote to Biddle : “I have delayed until now, to acknowledge the receipt of your favors of the 10th & 25th Ulto.”
I have been honoured with your letter of the 21st covering several letters to be forwarded to Great Britain, which I shall do with great pleasure, and beg you to believe that I shall at all times cheerfully execute Similar commands. The plan for establishing the board of agriculture in England, I will lay before the Committee of Congress on that subject, as you request. Mr Monroe has made a...
Mr Monroe has lately demanded in a letter to the secretary of state an explanation of the letter of recall which was sent to him in France. That an inconvenient unwise and pernicious precedent might not be set his request has been denied and consequently that affair stands on the original grounds. I did not retain a copy of the opinion which I had the honor to give on this measure and...
I return you my sincere thanks for the kind invitation I received when last at Mount Vernon, to make it my home and that whilest there my services would be acceptable—This invitation was the more pleasing to me from a desire of being serviceable to you and from a hope in fulfiling those duties assigned me I should derive some improvement by them. Un-tutored in almost every branch of business,...
I have Received your Letter of the 17th Instant and I will do every thing In my power to git you a proper Person as overseer for Union farm—but at this time I do not know of any one that would answear your purpose that Is uningaged. but I will spare no paines In Looking out For such a One. I am sorrey to heare that poor Mr Clark is Dead. If he had Lived he would have made you a good Overseer....
I arrived at home on the 19th inst. and now repeat the 3d time my information to you of yr Rough creek lands. On the 25 of may I got on the lands, with a Surveyor, and the gentlemen, appointed by Lee & myself to Vallue the Same—after traceing the lines so as to keep us within the bounds of the land; we proceeded to traverse the two tracts and found them to consist of as follows; 1st Rooling...
The Cook I wish to dispose of, is at present under inoculation—As soon as he recovers, & is perfectly out of the way of communicating the disorder, he shall come down to Mount Vernon—You are perfectly welcome to keep him, till you have had a satisfactory trial of him—If he pleases you, I am sure we shall not disagree about his price. I have here about fifty bushels of Rye, but it is not yet...
My absence from this place for a few days prevented my receiving your letter transmitted by Mr Scot untill yesterday. I have not been able to hear any thing of the Calf you mention, but be assured should he arrive here he shall be taken the most particular Care of untill I receive your further orders, to execute which will afford me peculiar Satisfaction. I am with great respect your Obedt...
I do myself the pleasure of inclosing you a Certificate of a Transferr of 29 Shares of Columbia Stock. Your Letter to Collo. Ramsey has been forwarded, and I at the same time wrote to Mr Lloyd respecting the young Bakewell. Probably Mr Lloyd is out on a summers Excursion as I have yet received no answer. With sentiments of perfect Regard and Respect I am Dr sir Your mo. obt servt ALS , DLC:GW...
I beg to return you my best acknowledgements, for the trouble you had the goodness to take, in writing so long a letter, respecting the state of the different provinces in America, and where a European was likely to settle to the best advantage. When I took the liberty of writing you on that subject, I was in a very indifferent state of health, and our public prospects were extremely gloomy...
A few days ago, I received a letter, from Mr G. W. Custis of Princeton College, in which he made this remark, which was highly pleasing to me, & which I am confident will be pleasing to yourself, & to Mrs Washington—That his situation at College has become pleasant & agreeable—& that he now feels ambitious of improving to the best wishes of his friends. While he continues to be contented with...
I have the Honor to inclose a Copy of my address to the Board of Agriculture, delivered at the close of our late Session, from which you will perceive the present State of our Pursuits in the great Cause of Agriculture. I hope it will have the good fortune of meeting with your approbation. I also have the pleasure of herewith Sending the remainder of The original Surveys according to the plan...