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The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to The President of the United States. He has just ascertained that General Matthews would not accept. His son is older than was believed 29 years of age & has a family. As he will have the benefit of his fathers influence which is considerable and is a young man of real merit & as the appointment of any other candidate would be subject to...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States a contract which has been recently transmitted from South Carolina for the Keeping of the Light house in that State. The terms are some what less than those of the Lighthouse Keeper at Cape Henlopen, and considering the expences of living in South Carolina it is humbly conceived they are...
The Secretary of the Treasury has the honor respectfully to submit to the President of the United States a Contract made by the Collector of New London, with Nathaniel Richards for supplying the Light house belonging to that Port. This Contract not having been originally made in a manner sufficiently explanatory of the business, was returned for the purpose of being put into such form as...
The Secretary of the Treasury presents his respects to the President of the United States and sends him the Draft of a power concerning the intended Loans. If any thing more particular should occur to the President it may be the subject of a distinct instruction. LC , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. For the enclosure, see Washington to H, March 15, 1791 .
[ Philadelphia ] March 27, 1791 . “I have embraced the first moment of leisure to execute your wish, on the subject to which the enclosed notes are applicable. They are neither so accurate nor so full, as I should have been glad to make them; but they are all that my situation has permitted. Nothing new has occurred in my Department worth mentioning. I thought that the following extract of a...
I have duly received the private letter which you did me the honor to write me of the 4. instant. It is to be lamented that our system is such as still to leave the public peace of the Union at the mercy of each state Government. This is not only the case as it regards direct interferences, but as it regards the inability of the National Government in many particulars to take those direct...
I have the honor of your letter of the 4th. instant addressed to the Secretary of State the Secretary at War and myself; to which due obedience shall be paid on my part. A letter from Mr. Short dated at Amsterdam the 2d. of December has just come to hand giving me an account of his proceedings to that period; a copy of which will be forwarded by the tuesday’s post. He informs me, among other...
I have just received a letter from Mr. King in these words—“Mr. Elliot, who it has been said was appointed will not come to America, owing say his friends here to a disinclination on his part which has arisen from the death of his eldest or only son. Mr. Seaton yesterday read me an abstract of a letter from London dated February 2. & written, as he observed, by a man of information, which...
[ Philadelphia, April 11, 1791. On May 7, 1791, Washington wrote to Hamilton : “I have received … the opinions offered in your letters of the 11th.” Second letter of April 11 not found. ]
I have the honor to send herewith a copy of my letter of the 10 inst: and of that from Mr. Short of the 2d. of December to which it refers; and also the copy of another letter from Mr. Short of the 25 of January. The result of my submission to the vice president and the heads of Departments has been, that they have unanimously advised me to instruct Mr. Short to proceed to open a second loan...