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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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Here is at lenght a Safe occasion of writing to you, here I May tell you What Sincere Concern I feel at our Separation—There was never a friend, my dear general, So much, so tenderly Belov’d, as I do love and Respect you—happy in our union, in the pleasure of living with you, in that So Charming Satisfaction of partaking any Sentiment of your heart, any event of Your life, I had taken Such an...
from those happy ties of friendship By which you were pleas’d to unite yourself with me, from the promises You So tenderly made me when we parted at fishkill, I had Such expectations of hearing often from you, that Complaint ought to be permitted to my affectionate heart—not a line from you, my dear General, is yet arriv’d into My hands, and tho Several Ships from America, several dispatches...
here I am, My dear General, and in the Mist of the joy I feel in finding Myself again one of your loving Soldiers I take But the time of telling you that I Came from france on Board of a fregatt Which the king Gave me for my passage —I have affairs of the utmost importance that I should at first Communicate to You alone—in Case my Letter finds you Any where this side of philadelphia, I Beg You...
here I am, My dear General, and in the Mist of the joy I feel in finding Myself again one of your loving Soldiers I take But the time of telling you that I Came from france on Board of a fregatt which the king gave me for my passage—I have affairs of the utmost importance that I shall at first Communicate to You alone—in case my letter finds you Any where this side of philadelphia, I Beg you...
You know, my dear General, that I am very anxious of Seeing the Army well cloathed for this Campaign—the importance of Such a Measure is on every Account obvious, and from the knowledge I have of the Auxiliary troops that Are Coming I Can so well demonstrate its Necessity, that I shall for the present But Attend to the Means of executing it. in the Space of Six Month (we know from experience)...
You have desired, My dear General, I would put in writing a Summary of the ideas which I gave as my opinion in our Conversation of last Night. This I am the more inclin’d to do, that, tho’ I feel for your delicacy on the occasion, I would think it very wrong not to go the same length with the French forces as you would do with those of the United States. The Idea of Starving Newyork has been...
Having heard of an Express from Rhodeisland being going through the Continental Village I sent for him as it would not delay him More than an hour—inclosed I have the honor to send you the letter from gal heath which I have oppen’d and also two letters from the french Generals to me—it seems, My dear General, that they have Anticipated the desire you express’d yourself of settling our plans in...
As I find an express going from hartfort to general greene, I send this letter to him, that you might hear some thing further about the Recruits of Connecticut. From the Colonel under genl parsons who is intrusted with the Care of forwarding them I hear that By the first of August two thousand of them will be at West point—But I had put in My head that they were to Bring Arms with them and I...
I hasten to inform you that the Milling transport is safely arriv’d on the 19th at Boston. She is said to be a two decker and to have on Board a vast deal of powder with pieces of ordinance, and also the Baggage of the fficers of Bourbionnois —The intelligence Came this instant By an officer of our Army who saw the Men incamp’d on the Commons from where they were to March to Providence—Two...
I had this morning the honor to waït on his excellency the governor, and took the liberty, tho in a private Capacity, to inform him of our Circumstances—the Result of our Conversation I will therein transmit to You and to be More Certain of Conveying the governor’s ideas, I am writing at his own house and will show him My letter Before I fold it up. to Begin By the Article of powder which is...