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    • Humphreys, David
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    • Washington, George
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    • Confederation Period

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Documents filtered by: Author="Humphreys, David" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Confederation Period"
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I intended fully, when I left Philadelphia, to have written to you from New York, but on my arrival there my Servant (who was a German) ran away, & I was so occupied in procuring another, that I have not been able to take up the pen until the present moment. Recollecting imperfectly, as I do, the purport of Mr Jefferson’s letter, as well as of the Extract from the Encyclopedia; I have found...
I have this moment been honored with your letter of the 22nd of Octr & am thereby relieved from some anxiety for fear mine of the 24th of Septr had miscarried. For the reasons you mention, I think it will be best that the General Meeting of the Cincinnati should be holden at Philadelphia. I am happy that the enclosures have met with your approbation. A few days ago, I addressed a letter to you...
Being uncertain whether this letter will arrive at Bourdeaux in time to be carried to America by the vessel which brought me your favour of the 25th of July, I will content myself with assuring you how deeply I am penetrated by those expressions of confidence & friendship with which it is replete. Whether I should, or should not be at liberty to accept the liberal offer you make I cannot at...
I was obliged to close my last Letter of the 18th of Augst so abruptly that I had not even time to tell you how much satisfaction it would afford me, should I be able by my communications to contribute in any degree to your amusement or information, as you were pleased to intimate—permit me now to assure you, that the delightful employment of thus conversing with my dearest General, under the...
Since I had the pleasure of writing you last, I have received Orders to march the part of my Regt which is raised in Connecticut to this place. Two compleat Companies arrived on Saturday last. They occupy the Barracks & take the guard of the Arsenal & Magazines. I intend to return to Hartford in a few days, & shall remain there probably for some time. As I conceived you would be anxious to...
I had the pleasure, before I left New York, to receive your favor containing the enclosures respecting Asgil’s affair, and am taking measures for their publication —Interested, as I feel myself in your wellfare & happiness, I could not but be extremely affected by the account of your ill-health; and beg you will let me know in what condition your health is, as I shall not find myself at ease...
I cannot permit M. Houdon to depart for Mt Vernon without being the bearer of a line from me. I am very happy Mr Jefferson has been able to procure him to make the voyage, because I am persuaded he will be able to transmit an excellent likeness of you to the remotest ages. He is considered as one of the ablest statuaries in Europe & has performed some capital peices for the Empress of Russia....
Since I had the honor to receive by the last Packet your favor dated in Feby last I have been unwell with a slight fever, & tho recovered at this moment it has retarded my public business in such a manner, as will prevent me from writing so particularly as I wished to have done by the present opportunity. I am extremely concerned & mortified to find that you have been under the necessity of...
(Private) My dear General. Fairfield [Conn.] April 9th 1787 Since I did myself the honor to address you on the 24th Ulto I have been in New York, & find such a variety of opinions prevailing with respect to the Convention, that I think it expedient to write to you again on the subject. General Knox has shewn to me, in confidence, his last letter to you. tho’ I cannot concur in sentiments...
I have but just had the pleasure to receive your two favours of the 18th of Feby and 8th instant—Nor will I delay a moment giving my sentiments on the subject of the latter, for the sake of throwing them into a more elegant dress or methodical arrangement. I need hardly preface my observations by saying, that I feel myself superlatively happy in your confidential communications, and in...