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    • Sullivan, John
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    • Washington, George
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    • Revolutionary War

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Documents filtered by: Author="Sullivan, John" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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Dear General, I have the honor to inform your Excellency, that I have at length surmounted every obstacle and shall commence my March tomorrow morning. I have taken the necessary precaution (by duplicates) to apprize Genl. Clinton of this circumstance a copy of which I do myself the honor to inclose you. Your Excellency will be pleased to direct Col. Paulding to begin his march at such time,...
Extract of a letter from General Sullivan dated Wyalusing [Pa.] 6th Augt 1779. “On examining the state of our Stores I find that we have not more than forty days provision in Flour, nor will the Meat now on hand, with the greatest Oeconomy last more than two Months. This was all I could possibly procure and indeed full as much as I had means to carry; for the number of my Boats does not exceed...
Extract of a letter from General Sullivan dated at Wyalusing 7th Augt 1779. “In my last I gave your Excellency a particular and just Account of the state of my provisions, since which I have determined to keep open if possible the Channel of supplies, for my apprehensions of failure arise more from a probability of want, than from any possible resistance of the Enemy. Your Excellency will...
I have the honor to inform your Excellency that I arrived at this place with the army on the 11th inst. without any loss and without having received the least opposition from the enemy—all the accounts recd from your Excy as well as from every other quarter seemed to agree that the enemy were collecting their whole force at Chemung in order to give us battle. I thought if these accounts were...
Extract of a letter from General Sullivan, dated Tioga, August 20, 1779. “I have the pleasure to inclose your Excellency a copy of a letter from General Clinton, by which you will find that the much desired junction will be formed tomorrow. I inclose you a copy of my orders to General Poor who, in company with Gen. Hand and 1000 chosen troops, have joined General Clinton. I hope, on Monday the...
I have the pleasure to inform your Excellency that having formd the junction with General Clinton without loss, we marchd from Tioga the 26th in the afternoon, the Rains had swell’d the Cayuga so as to render our march to Chemung very difficult, as we had to ford the River twice in our Rout. We arriv’d there in the evening of the 28th and marchd for the place early in the morning of the 29th...
Copy of a letter from Major General Sullivan to General Washington dated Chemung 28th Sepr 1779. In mine of the 30th ultimo, I had the honor of informing your Excellency of the victory obtained over the enemy on the 29th of August, I now do myself the honor to inform you of the progress of this army, and the most material occurrences, which have since taken place. The time taken up in...
Letter not found : from John Sullivan, 30 Sept. 1779. On 8 Oct., GW wrote Sullivan: “I have had the pleasure of receiving yours of the 28th ulto from Chemung and 30th from Tioga.”
Letter not found : from John Sullivan, 11 Oct. 1779. On 14 Oct., GW wrote Sullivan: “I received your favor of the 11th instant.”
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 22 Oct. 1779 . GW wrote Sullivan on 25 Oct.: “I have been duly favored with your letter of the 22d.”
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. John Sullivan, 28 Oct. 1779 . GW wrote Sullivan on 31 Oct.: “I have your favr of the 28th.”
I have the honor to Inclose your Excellencey Copy of a Letter from Govr Livingston & beg your Excellenceys Direction —Should you think proper I will move the Troops on Return of the Express & will be preparing for a march untill he returns Should yr Excy think it not prudent to move there can no Inconvenience Arise from the preparations which may be made I have the Honor to be my Dear Genl...
I was Last Evening honored with your Excys favor of yesterday am making Every preparation for Removing the Troops to the place your Excy has Directed unless the Express which I Sent Yesterday Should previous to our Departure Return with orders for us to March toward Elizabeth Town I Shall move for Conklings the Moment I can Collect Waggons to move with—I have Much Difficulty in moving as we...
I am now movving to Pompton agreable to your Excys orders of yesterday. I find that the whole of the Rhode Island Army is Encamped on Staten Island in Addition to the Troops before Stationed there That they are making preparations for an Excursion Somewhere & it is Generally Conjectured That they Intend a Descent upon the Jersy Shore—This Conjecture Seems to be Strengthened by the Light Horse...
I am sorry to inform your Excellency, that I am under the painful necessity of leaving a Service, to which, I am by principle, & interest attached; and, among the variety of mortifications I must suffer in quitting it, that of being deprived the pleasure of serving under your Excellency, stands among the foremost—My Health is too much impair’d, to be recover’d, but by a total release from...
Perhaps, there was never more Justice in any advice, Than that given by the Philosopher to his Prince, viz. “Always beware of the Man, that flatters you, and appears to Coincide with your Sentiments, on all Occasions.” I am Confident that I have never appeared to your Excellencey in this Character, Nay I have Studied to Avoid Even the appearance of being a Flatterer—I have at the Same time,...
I was Some time Since honored with your favor of the 15th December, since which I have been tottally Incapable of writing untill within two Days past. I now take the Liberty to Intreat your Excellencys acceptance of my Thanks for the many oblidging things therein Contained. Though unfortunate Circumstances have Seperated me from you in the Military Line, I flatter myself that your Excellencey...
You will (I doubt not) forgive my neglect in not writing you when I assure you that I have had nothing to communicate which Could give you pleasure or avoid giving you pain—& that I was unwilling to add to the pressure which your mind has been so Long accustomed to—to Enumerate the Evils which have flown from party Spirit from inattention and from other Sources would fill a volume in Folio. we...
I am honored with your Excellencys Favor of the 20th Instant—and feel myself under the greatest obligation for your obliging Condescension in Consenting to a Continuation of my Letters. Sensible of your Situation & Course of Business I feared to write Lest your Politeness Should Divert your attention from important matters & Lead you to answer Even where an Answer appeared unnecessary. But I...
I was this morning Honored with your Excellency favor of the 25th Instant; I shall be happy to See the Chevalier De Chaltelieux and to pay him every mark of respect & attention in my Power. The Confidence your Excellency is pleased to place in me is exceeding flattering and I can with great Truth assure you That no person Desires more to Comply with your wishes to relieve you from the Anxiety...
The Avarice of Connecticut & the Jealousy of Pensylvania have brought on a Dispute which could not be Settled but by a Resolution for Your Excellency to releive the present Garrison of Wyoming with Troops not Drawn from the Line of Either of Said States—Leaving it in Your Discretion to Determine whether a Garrison was necessary at that Place a full persuasion that You wish to Exercise this &...
The only apology I can make for not answering Sooner your Excellencys favor of the 17th ulto is that I wished to forward my Letter by Colo. Laurens who has been unexpectedly Delayed from Setting off for Head Quarters. Since Rivingtons Publication I feel Some reluctance at venturing my Letters by the Post. Your Excellencys Letter of the 27th ulto was Yesterday read in Congress & Referrd to...
The Committee appointed by Congress to quiet the disturbances of the Pennsynvania Line &ca think is proper to inform your Excellency that they arrived at this place last night after dark; And that President Reed who acts in concert with us has proceeded to the neighbourhood of Princetown at which place those Troops are now posted. We are happy to inform your Excellency that some favourable...
I have the Honor to Inclose Your Excy by Directions of the Committee a Copy of a Letter from Govr Read with Copy of the proposals made by the Committee to the Mutineers of the Pensylvania Line by which first it appears that they are Determined to Accept of the Terms offered & we flatter ourselves That this unhappy Dispute will Soon be brought to a favorable Issue. I have the Honor to be most...
We are Happy to inform Your Excellency that the terms offerd to the Pennsylvania troops are at length finally and as we believe cordially and Satisfactorily agreed on, and tomorrow we expect the Pennsylvania line will be arranged in its former order, Constitutionally, no Concession has been granted them that the critical Situation of our affairs did not Warrant and Justice dictate. As an...
I have only time to Inform Your Excey by Colo. Smith that the British Spies have been Executed The Commissioners are now Busy in adjusting the Claims of redressing the Grievances of the Pensylvania Troops and now Trust That Every Danger of Defections is past. I have the honor to be most respectfully your Excys most obedt Servt DLC : Papers of George Washington.
We have hitherto given your Excellency Intelligence from time to time of the State of things respecting the Pennsylvania line and have now the pleasure to Inform you that the terms agreed on by the Committe from the Executive Council of Pennsylvania with them are now coming into Execution, in as peaceable and Quiet manner as could possibly be expected—two Regts have been already settled with...
after my return to this City I had the Honor of your Excellencys favor of the 16th Instant we found that the almost total Dissolution of the Pensylvania Line by Furlough or Discharge was absolutely necessary & a re-incorporation the only remedy that could be applied for as a body they would have been Troublesome if not Dangerous. they are Trying to Inlist again and I fear too many of the...
I was Duly honored with your Excellencys favor of the 4th of Feby & omitted writing Since upon a Supposition that you had gone to Rhode Island. I am happy to find your Excellency Entertains the Same Sentiments of the virtues and abilities of Colo. Hamilton as I have ever done myself—After I wrote your Excellency I found The Eyes of Congress Turned on Robert Morris of this City as Treasurer . I...
Having Experienced so much Ingratitude myself, I cannot help feeling for those in Similar Circumstances. I Therefore take the Liberty of mentioning to your Excellency Colo. Derrick who I think has Sacrificed much in our Cause and has Experienced only Ingratitude in return. he first Entered in the Pensylvania Line as Captain, was afterward Transfered to the Artillery & perswaded by General...