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    • Pickering, Timothy
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Documents filtered by: Author="Pickering, Timothy" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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’Tis with real pain I ask your Excellency’s attention (engaged as it is in affairs of such vast importance) to the subject of this letter: but justice, & compassion to the distressed (not to say the injured) compel me to do it. The bearer Capt. McGlathry about a month since was coming from the eastward with a load of wood, bound to Salem, but was taken by a man of war, & afterwards retaken by...
Convinced of the utility, the necessity, at all times, of a well disciplined militia, to every free state; when the united wisdom of the continent, referring to the contest with the parent kingdom, called on every colony to prepare for the most unhappy events; and the more immediate recommendations of our provincial congress demanded a diligent application to the military art; deeming the...
I esteem it a singular honour done me by your Excellency in offering me the post of Adjutant General, and it pains me sensibly that I am obliged to decline it. ’Tis an honour to which I did not aspire, because I did not account myself equal to the important business of the office. Your Excellency does not mistake my attachment to the interests of the United States; ’tis sincere & unalterable....
I sent by the express an answer to your letter respecting the office of adjutant general, & gave what appeared to me sufficient reasons to excuse my declining to accept it; but have since been uneasy, lest you should deem them otherwise; & that I was too willing, under the civil offices I sustain, to shelter myself from the dangers & fatigues of war. An opinion which, if it has taken place, I...
I had the honour to receive your Excellency’s letter by Col. Lee, conferring upon me the office of adjutant general: And since, notwithstanding all my objections, ’tis your Excellency’s pleasure, I am happy to declare my acceptance of it. At the same time I am constrained, from my real feelings; again to express my fears that I shall fall short of your Excellency’s expectations. Few people are...
It often happens that soldiers are discharged without being paid off, or furnished with a certificate of what is their due. A number of such men have been discharged lately by General McIntosh. One of them is now at the board, & presents an account of twenty one pounds & upwards, due to him for wages. As he has been long at the hospital, ’tis not improbable the demand is just; yet we cannot...
The inclosed copy of a letter from Thomas Smith Esqr. will inform you of the distressed condition of the frontiers of this state. The counties of Westmoreland & Northumberland are equally exposed with Bedford. Other accounts correspond with that of Mr Smith, & shew that a general stroke is greatly to be apprehended; and that in addition to the barbarous savages, the disaffected inhabitants are...
Capt. Armstrong arrived here yesterday with some necessaries for the North Carolina troops, among them 2768 blankets: but the whole being stowed in four waggons, I was led to inquire of the size of the blankets, & find they are so narrow that two must be sewed together to make one. Genl McIntosh informed me that the North Carolina brigade was already nearly supplied with blankets. This induced...
General Gates has written to Congress describing his distressed situation from the want of men, money, arms, provisions &c. We were surprized at the mention of arms ; for by a return made in February it appeared that better than 2000 stands were then at Albany, fit for service; and the board have never given any order respecting them. Colo. Malcom says a quantity were sent from thence lately...
This morning it occurred to me that very little if any of the cloathing at Springfield had been sent forward to the main army; and that as six brigades will perhaps remain here or in the neighbourhood for some time; or at least may not return soon to the westward, it may be best to order a sufficiency of the cloathing for them to be stopped, which will save an expensive carriage of a hundred...
Justice and the Public Interest require that all Allowances engaged to the Army should be punctually paid; We regret that the precautions which sometimes seem necessary to prevent frauds to the United States, often cause such Delays as eventually deprive the Soldiers of the Benefits promised them; We are led to make these Observations from the present Application of a pay Master in Behalf of...
I have the happiness to inform you that the box, containing the orderly books & some returns, which has been so long missing is found. It was carried to Reading, from whence it was lately brought to this city with Genl Mifflin’s papers. ’tis now at the War Office, & waits your orders. I am desired by the board to remind your Excellency of their request to know your sentiments relative to the...
Letter not found : from Timothy Pickering, 5 March 1779. GW wrote Pickering on 10 March : “I had the honor of your letter of the 5th Inst. with its inclosures.”
Letter not found : from Timothy Pickering, 13 March 1779. GW wrote to Pickering on 20 March : “I have the honor of yours of the 13th instant inclosing a Copy of a letter from Colo. Brodhead with an estimate of the Stores necessary for an expedition against Detroit.”
yours of the 22d inst. came to hand yesterday evening. I immediately sent orders to the Clothier General to send on to camp without delay all the shirts, over-alls & blankets in his possession, reserving only so many as were necessary to answer the orders given for supplying Colo. Proctors & Colo. Hartley’s regiments. The Clothier General informs me there will then remain but about 150...
Last evening an express arrived here from Charlestown, which place he left the 23d of June. He brought a letter of that date to the honble Mr Laurens, who gave the following extract, viz. “General Lincoln having received such intelligence of the intentions, strength & position of the enemy as rendered it advisable to attack them at Stono Ferry, did so on the 20th inst., about 7 o’clock in the...
Yesterday afternoon arrived here the armed Cutter Royal George of 14 guns, prize to the Pickering of Salem. Coming addressed to me, a number of private letters found on board fell into my hands. Some of them contained intelligence which seemed of importance sufficient to be communicated to your Excellency. I have therefore made in haste the inclosed extracts. The private sentiments & anecdotes...
You will doubtless ere this reaches you, have been informed that Congress have been pleased to appoint me quarter master general. This was so totally unexpected, that it will take me some days yet before I can get ready to proceed to camp. In the mean time I shall make some necessary arrange⟨m⟩ents for conducting the business of the de⟨pa⟩rtment in this state and the other states s⟨ou⟩thward...
No opportunity having presented during the winter, of sending your barge to Potowmack; when last in New York I left fresh directions to find a conveyance by the first vessel bound to Alexandria. I have this moment received advice that such a conveyance is engaged. Captain Brothes has agreed to deliver the barge at Alexandria, to colonel Fitzgerald, for whom I left a letter, requesting him to...
Generally speaking, no task could be imposed on me so ungrateful as that of applying for a public office. In the present instance, however, I feel little reluctance in doing it; because I know the application will be duly noticed, and the ultimate decision, whether for or against me, be governed by a just regard to the interests of the United States. By some of my friends I am informed that Mr...
The messenger to the Seneca nation set off this afternoon, with a letter addressed by me to their Sachems Chiefs & Warriors, informing them of my appointment from you to meet them under the authority of the United States; inviting the relations of the deceased Indians to come to Tioga on the 25th of October next; and expressing your desire that the chiefs of the Turtle tribe, & other Great Men...
4 barrels of Country rum 120 gall. @ at 3/. £ 18. 0.0 Provisions for 200 Indians 12 days, including the supplies they must receive when going home, viz.  3200 lbs. of beef @ 3 d. 40. 0.0  32 Cwts flour @ 15/. 24.  .  A silver gorget & other trinkets 10.  .  1 Cwt of tobacco & pipes 2.10.  94.10.0 Provisions & necessaries for T. Pickering, & Colo. Wilson, agent for Pennsylvania, & for the...
In obedience to your orders I held a Conference with the Chiefs &c. of the Seneca nation of Indians at Tioga in this state. About 220 of all ages attended. The day of meeting proposed was the 25th of October: but they did not arrive until the 15th of November. Such delays, I am informed, are common with them; but in the present instance I believe are greatly to be attributed to the...
In obedience to your orders of the 4th of September last, I took the necessary steps for holding a conference with the Logstown Chiefs & warriors of the Seneca Nation of Indians; relative to the murders of two of their people at Pine Creek in Pennsylvania. I wrote to them by the express who at the same time carried a letter from the president of Pennsylvania. In my letter I informed them,...
Having been accidentally detained here longer than I expected, and a little leisure now presenting, I have thought it would not be misapplied in suggesting the means of introducing the art of husbandry, and civilization, among our Indian neighbours. In the treaty with the Creek Indians, I observe provision is made for furnishing them with domestic animals and instruments of husbandry, with a...
I intended to have done myself the honour of waiting on you in person: but a letter may give you less trouble. General Knox informed me that it would be agreeable to you that I should undertake the superintendency of the northern Indians; I mean particularly the Six Nations. I answered, That by the new constitution of Pennsylvania, a Continental appointment was declared to be incompatible with...
(Duplicate) Sir, Philadelphia May 2d 1791. Of the measures pursuing by general Knox, relative to Indian affairs, he doubtless makes to you the necessary communications. In those communications, he may, perhaps, have mentioned my being here, preparatory to my undertaking another mission to the Indians of the Six Nations, for the purpose of confirming the peace and friendship subsisting between...
I did myself the honour to call at your house to-day, to speak with you: but you were engaged with Mr Jefferson. And the time not admitting another opportunity (as I wish to leave town on Monday morning) you will permit me to communicate what I had to say, in writing. As you thought it expedient, I went to New York, to converse with Mr Osgood on the business of the post-office. The contracts...
Among the great duties of your high station, the selection of proper characters for public offices is not the least difficult, nor the least important. The multiplicity of applications, the diversity, and sometimes the contrariety of opinions, must often produce painful embarrassments: while a constant aim to provide for the public service, will frequently oblige you to disregard private...
The manner in which I have been employed to effect the present visit of the Chiefs of the Five Nations, renders me peculiarly interested that the negociations with them should conform with the direct object of the invitation. This object is indelibly impressed on my mind; it having been the main argument offered by me, to convince them of the real friendship of the United States. I feel...