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Documents filtered by: Author="Madison, James" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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Letter not found. 27 July 1788 . Acknowledged in Washington to JM, 3 Aug. 1788 . Reports ratification of the Constitution by the New York convention.
Mr. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and informs him that Mr. Johnson, the candidate for the light-house appointment, having left the City yesterday morning, it cannot now be ascertained how far he is apprised of the limited provision annexed to the place. RC ( DNA : RG 59, State Department, Miscellaneous Letters). Addressed by JM.
Letter not found. 20 October 1785. In a letter of 29 October from Washington to JM he refers to JM’s “favor of the 20th.” with an enclosure, which contained suggestions of a suitable form for Washington’s letter to the General Assembly requesting the donation to some public institution of the Assembly’s gift of canal shares to Washington.
Letter not found: from James Madison, 11 Dec. 1784. On 28 Dec. GW wrote to Madison : “I have been favored with your letter of the 11th.”
Letter not found. 11 December 1784, Richmond . Washington had traveled to Annapolis to further his favored scheme for an interstate project to build a canal along the Potomac River. He acknowledged the arrival of this letter on 28 December. JM probably told Washington of the main business that had occupied the General Assembly since Washington’s departure from Richmond ca. 20 November.
Letter not found: from James Madison, 27 July 1788. On 3 Aug. GW wrote Madison : “Your favors of the 21st & 27th of last month came duly to hand.”
Letter not found: from James Madison, 20 Oct. 1785. On 29 Oct. GW wrote Madison : “Receive my thanks for your obliging favor of the 20th.”
The arrival of R. H. Lee yesterday has made up a Quorum of the Senate. A Quorum in the other House was made on wednesday last. The ballots will be opened today unless an indisposition of Mr. Basset should prevent, which was not probable yesterday afternoon. The notifications to the President & Vice President will be left to the Senate. Mr. Charles Thomson will be the Messenger to the former....
I have at length the pleasure to inclose you the favorable result of the Convention at Boston. The amendments are a blemish, but are in the least Offensive form. The minority also is very disagreeably large, but the temper of it is some atonement. I am assured by Mr. King that the leaders of it as well as the members of it in general are in good humour; and will countenance no irregular...
I have deferred writing since my arrival here in the hourly hope of being enabled to communicate the final news from Poughkepsie. By a letter from Hamilton dated the day before yesterday I find that it is equally uncertain when the business will be closed, and what will be its definitive form. The inclosed gazettes state the form which the depending proposition bears. It is not a little...
I have been honored with your Excellency’s favor of the 22d inst: bearing testimony to the merits & talents of Mr McHenry. The character which I had preconceived of this gentleman was precisely that which your representation has confirmed. As Congress have not yet fixed the peace establishment for their foreign affairs and will not probably fill up vacancies unless there be some critical...
Another mail has arrived from Boston without terminating the conflict between our hopes and fears. I have a letter from Mr King of the 27 which after dilating somewhat on the ideas in his former letters, concludes with the following paragraph—“We have avoided every question which would have shewn the division of the House. Of consequence we are not positive of the numbers on each side. By the...
The Convention came to a final adjournment to day. The inclosed is a copy of their act of ratification with the yeas & nays. A variety of amendments have been since recommended; several of them highly objectionable; but which could not be parried. The Minority are to sign an address this evening which is announced to be of a peace-making complexion. Having not seen it I can give no opinion of...
The Count de Moustier arrived here a few days ago as successor to the Chevr de la Luzerne. His passage has been so tedious that I am not sure that the despatches from Mr Jefferson make any considerable addition to former intelligence. I have not yet seen them, but am told that this is the case. In general it appears that the affairs of Holland are put into pacific train. The Prussian troops...
I have been here too short a time as yet to have collected fully the politics of the Session. In general appearances are favorable. On the question for a paper emission the measure was this day rejected in emphatical terms by a majority of 84 vs 17. The affair of the Missisippi is but imperfectly known. I find that its influence on the federal spirit will not be less than was apprehended. The...
The Daily Advertizer of this date contains several important articles of information, which need only be referred to. I inclose it with a few other late papers. Neither French nor English packet is yet arrived; and the present weather would prevent their getting in if they should be on the Coast. I have heard nothing of Consequence from Massachussetts since my last. The accounts from New...
I am just favored with yours of the 7th. inst: and will attend to your wishes as to the political essays in the press. I have given notice to my friends in Orange that the County may command my services in the Convention if it pleases. I can say with great truth however that in this overture I sacrifice every private inclination to considerations not of a selfish nature. I foresee that the...
The Eastern Mail which arrived yesterday brought me a letter from Mr. King, of which a copy follows. “Our prospects are gloomy, but hope is not entirely extinguished. Gerry has not returned to the Convention, and I think will not again be invited. We are now thinking of Amendments to be submitted not as a condition of our assent & ratification, but as the Opinion of the Convention subjoined to...
I subjoin two resolutions lately taken by Congress in relation the Mississippi which I hope may have a critical and salutary effect on the temper of our western Brethren. In Congress Sepr 16 On report of the Committee &c. to whom was referred the Report of the Secy for For. Affairs on a motion of the Delegates of North Carolina, stating the uneasiness produced by a report “that Congress are...
Your favour of came to hand by the mail of Wednesday. I did not write by several late returns for two reasons; one the improbability of [your] having got back to Mount Vernon; the other a bilious indisposition which confined me for some days. I am again tolerably well recovered. Appearances at present are less favorable than at the date of my last. Our progress is slow and every advantage is...
Mr Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and begs leave to lay before him the inclosed letters, on behalf of a candidate for a vacancy in the Custom-House Department in Virginia. Mr M. being a perfect stranger to the candidate can add no information whatever of his own. He knows Mr Maury well, and considers his recommendation as respectable. AL , DLC:GW . On the reason...
Mr. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President, and begs to mention the wish of Joseph Nevil Esqr. (late a member of the House of Representatives) to be taken into consideration in the appointment of Surveyor, under the law for the sale of lands N. West of the Ohio. He takes the liberty also of inclosing a letter from General Posey, expressing his wishes with respect to an...
Along with this are inclosed a few of the latest gazettes containing the additional papers in favor of the federal Constitution. I find by letters from Richmond that the proceedings of the Assembly, are as usual, rapidly degenerating with the progress of the Session: and particularly that the force opposed to the Act of the Convention has gained the ascendance. There is still nevertheless a...
RC ( LC : Washington Papers). Addressed to “His Excellency General Washington.” Cover missing. A draft of this letter, varying from recipient’s copy only in abbreviations, capitalization, and punctuation, is in LC : Madison Papers. I have been honored with Your Excellency’s favor of the 22d. inst: bearing testimony to the merits & talents of Mr. McHenry. The character which I had preconceived...
J. Madison presents his respectful compliments to the President & returns the Treatise on small Canals &c, with his acknowledgments for the perusal of it. He is not enough conversant with such subjects to decide on the merits of the various plans & machinery recommended by the Author. In general his principles appear to be both effective & practicable; but the question of their utility must be...
The Count de Moustier arrived here a few days ago as Successor to the Chevr. de la Luzerne. His passage has been so tedious that I am not sure that the despatches from Mr. Jefferson make any considerable addition to former intelligence. I have not yet seen them, but am told that this is the case. In general it appears that the affairs of Holland are put into pacific train. The Prussian troops...
The prospect in Massts. seems to brighten, if I view in the true light the following representation of it. “This day, (Jany. 30) for the first our President Mr. Handcock took his seat in Convention, and we shall probably terminate our business on saturday or tuesday next. I can not predict the issue, but our hopes are increasing. If Mr. Hancock does not disappoint our present expectations, our...
J. Madison presents his apologies to the President for not sending the pamphlets &c. from Sir J. Sinclair, sooner for the use of Mr. Peters, as was intimated when he last had the honor of seeing the President. He had hopes of being able prior to this to have looked a little into them, and have complied with the desire of the President expressed when the papers were put into J. M’s hands. It...
After being detained 8 or 10 days beyond the intended commencement of my Journey, by the critical illness of my mother, I am now subjected to a further delay by an attack on my own health. A slight complaint in my bowels which I first felt on the day of my arrival here (friday last) very suddenly took the form of a pretty severe dysentery. With the aid of Doctr Stuart who has been good eno’ to...
The Convention of N. Hampshire has afforded a very disagreeable subject of communication. It has not rejected the Constitution, but it has failed to adopt it. Contrary to all the calculations that had been made it appeared on the meeting of the members that a majority of 3 or four was adverse to the object before them, and that on a final question on the merits, the decision would be in the...