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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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It is a Melancholy thought to Me that While I Could Be So Happy at Mount Vernon, I am Still Almost As much Separated from you as I have Been for five Years in the Coalitionary prisons—But Altho’ I Lament, yet I Cannot Repent the determination we Have Been obliged to take—Much Less on Account of My Health which Has Been Recovering fast Enough, than for the very Bad and Lingering Condition in...
I hope you have receiv’d my letter from Cramberry where I aquaint you that I am going to hice town tho’ we are schort of provisions—when I got there I was very sorry to hear that Mister hamilton who had been riding all the night had not been able to find any body who could give him certain intelligences—but by a party who comes back I hear the ennemy are in motion, and theyr Rear about one...
I Have Received Your first favour from Philadelphia with the Greater Satisfaction, as it promises me the pleasure to Hear Again from you Before long —a pleasure, My Beloved General, which Your friend’s filial Heart wants to Anticipate, and Enjoys most Affectionately—I Have not Been surprised to Hear of Your Attendance at the Convention, and would indeed Have wondered at a denial—on the success...
From the Bottom of My Heart I Congratulate you upon the Arrival of the French Fleet—Some Rumors Had Been spread, and spy accounts sent out—But no Certainty untill the Admiral’s dispatches Came to Hand—Inclosed I send you His letter and that of Mis. de St Simon Both of whom I Request you will Have translated By Tilmangh or Gouvion alone as there are parts of them personal which I do not choose...
Your letter of the 10th of May is the last one that Came into My Hands for which I Beg leave to offer You My Best thanks—and in Case former Answers do not Arrive, I Must Again tell you How Happy You Made Your friend By Your letters inclosing the proceedings of the Army—In Every instance, My dear General, I Have the Satisfaction to Love and to Admire you—the Conduct You Had on that Occasion was...
I am sorry to hear from Major Gibs that My letter of last Night did not Reach you Before your departure from head quarters—it had been written at one o’clock, as soon as I took my position for the Night, and intrusted to Clel Ogden who promis’d to send it By an officer acquainted with the Roads. depending upon your Communication of the sad intelligence to Cher de la luzerne, I did not send to...
I can not let go back my guide without taking this opportunity of wraiting to your excellency tho’ I have not yet public business to speak of—I go on very slowly some times pierced by rain, sometimes covered with snow, and not thinking many handsome thoughts about the projected incursion into canada —if succèss were to be had it would surprise me in a more agreable manner, by that very reason...
A Man is just Arriv’d at My quarters who says that the Cork fleet Arriv’d in Newyork on Sunday last—his informant saw himself thirty six vessels Coming up—the Man adds that Gnl Smith is gone to the City and suppos’d to embark with this late envoy of troops—But I don’t put a perfect dependance on what he says nor on the inclos’d letter he has Brought me from Merc ereau —I am sure that the...
I have Receiv’d your excellency’s favor notifying your arrival at cramberry and am glad to have anticipated your orders in not going too far—I have felt the unhappy effects of the want of provisions for I dare say if we had not been Stopp’d by it, as we were already within three miles of the ennemy’s rear, we would very easely have overtaken them, and fouht with advantage. I have Consulted the...
to My Great disappointment Mr P—— is Return’d this Morning and Brings no details with him—I Wanted him to Go Again, But You alone Can induce him to do it—from what he Says, the Ennemy are going to undertake A great Movement—he will himself wait on you and tell you what had been Said to him about Rhode island, and what about improving the opportunity of theyr fleet’s going to London—tho I do...
Your orders have reach’d me so late, and found me in such a situation that it will be impossible to follow them as soon as I could wish—it is not on account of any other motive than the impossibility of moving the troops and making Such a march immediately for in receiving your letter I have given up the project of attaking the ennemy, and I only wish to join general lee —I was even going to...
I Have Had some time Ago the pleasure to write you a letter the duplicate of which shall Accompany this —The intelligence Has Since Come to Us of your Having Accepted the Command of the Armies—But you will Not be the less pleased to hear of the dispositions to a fair Reconciliation on the part of the French directory which I Hope will be Reciprocated By the American Governement—To what I took...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. Lafayette, c.30 Oct. 1778. GW wrote Vice Admiral d’Estaing on 31 Oct. : “I received a letter yesterday from the Marquis.”
Your letters Become More and More distant, and I Anxiously Wish for your Speedy Appointement to the Presidency, in order that You May Have a More Exact Notice of the Opportunities to Write to Me. This Will not tell you Much of politics. The two Imperial Courts are preparing for a Vigorous Campaign Against the turks. Russia intends Sending a Squadron into the Mediterranean, and altho’ it does...
Altho’ I Cannot omit an opportunity of writing to You, my letter will not Be so long and Minuted as I would like to make it, Because of the Constant Hurry of Business occasioned By the Assembly—every day, Sundays excepted, is taken up with General Meetings, Committee’s, and smaller Boards—it is a pretty extraordinary sight at Versailles, the more so as great deal of patriotism and firmness Has...
I have Receiv’d three different Accounts from Newyork, and tho’ the Authorities Are Not unquestionable—I will lay them before you that we May Compare them with other Accounts. A man Sent in By dr Burnet Says that part of the Cork fleet is Arriv’d, betwen twenty and forty Sails—that the Rest is given over for lost—the troops in Newyork about 1500—at Bergen 250—there was an alarm on the 15th at...
As you will Receive a letter from Gal St Clair Who had been desir’d by Congress to Go with me to the Pensilvania line, I have Nothing to add But that I am here with him, and that I Impatiently wait for Your Arrival which has been Announc’d by Mjor Fishburne on his Going through this place. This Affair is the More Serious as the Men have Appointed a Committee Compos’d of Theyr Ring Leaders...
This letter is not By Any Means directed to the Commander in chief, But to My Most Intimate and Confidential friend—I will lay Before you My Circumstances and My wishes—Certain I am You will do whatever You Can for me that is Consistent with Your public duty. When I went to the Southward You know I Had Some private objections—But I Became Sensible of the Necessity there was for the detachement...
I have Sign’d the paper because I have been told I schould Sign it, and because almost all the others who were of the same opinion as I am have also sign’d —for, Sir, I will easely schow you that there were Six gentlemen for more than fifteen hundred and only six for fifteen hundred . they are as follows. general lee baron de Stueben Some of the Second   column were for   2500, but would...
Here is a letter from Mercereau which says very little, and the little which is said in it I don’t take to be true—But thought I had better send his scroll to head Quarters—I have sent him word that there was no monney for such intelligences as these. Captain Ogden told me that one of our Jersay spies had lately writen to you—I have directed him to go to head quarters and report of some thing...
inclos’d I have the honor to send you a letter from General Sullivan which I took the liberty to oppen —if the suppos’d expedition against providence has taken place we can not Come up time enough as to prevent it—but I am Rather inclin’d to believe we wi’ll find the ennemy fortifying themselves, and therefore the Sooner we may begin our visit the better it will be. I have found general Varnum...
This letter will be Handed By cll Morris who waits upon Your Excellency with Gal Greene’s Sentiments upon the different ways to Improve Count de Grasses assistance. I Have Been desired to Add my Accounts But the last letter I Had the Honor to write Has Anticipated the Informations Which Gral Greene wanted me to give. The Light Infantry are 850—the Pennsylvania 600—Virginia exchanged soldiers...
You will be surpris’d to hear that other vessels are arriv’d from France, and that we have not receiv’d by them any public nor private dispatchesall the pacquets were on board the Ariel who was dismasted in the storm and put back into L’orient—Mr de Vauban who was intrusted with these letters thought it not advisable for himself or his pacquets to come on board of Merchant vessels and very...
The Sails are just going to be hoisted, My dear General, and I have But the time of taking my last leave from you—I may now be Certain that Congréss did not intend to Send Any thing more By me—The Navy Board, and Mister Nevill write me this very morning from Boston that the North River is passable, that a gentleman from Camp Says he di’nt hear of any thing like an express for me—all agree to...
The News I have got from france, the Reflexions I have made by myself, and these which have been Suggested to me by many people, particularly by the Admiral, increase more than ever the desire I had of Seeing again your excellency—I want to Communicate you my Sentiments, and take your opinion upon my present Circumstances—that I look upon as of An high moment to my private business and...
that there has been an action fought where I could have been and where I was not, is a thing which will seem as extraordinary to you as it seems so to myself—after a long journey and a longer stay from home (I mean from head quarters) the only satisfactory day I might have finds me in the middle of a town—there I had been sent, push’d, hurri’d by the board of general officers, and principally...
To My Great disappointement I Had no letter from You By this packet—it is However the only Regular Way to Get intelligences, and Mercantile Opportunities are not By far So much to Be depended on—I warmly Beg, my dear General, you will not let me Be Uneasy for want of a line from You—the distance is already so great in itself, and So much Greater for the feelings of the tenderest friendship,...
This letter will be presented to You By Mr Forster whose father, The Celebrated professor and Captain Cooke’s fellow traveller Has Requested In Behalf of His Son these Recommandatory Lines—I am sure His Name Was to You a Sufficient Introduction—and in His personal merit there is also a Sufficient inducement to wish for his wellfare—Yet I should be Highly pleased to Hope that My Recommandation...
This letter will Be delivered By Mr du Pont the Son of a Very Sensible and Honest Gentleman, who Has Been Much Emploied in Affairs of Administration, and is Now Very zealously Engaged in drawing Up A Report for our Commercial affairs. His Son Goes out for His instruction, and With a wiew to fit Himself for future Emploiement. I Beg leave to Recommend Him to Your patronage and Advices, and am...
The departure of the Washington Has Been So Sudden that I Could not get in time on Board the Particular letter which you ought to Have Received—So that My Correspondance Has Been Confined to an official Cincinnati letter, and a Bill of plated wares, which was not By Any means my intention —inclosed I Send you a duplicate of the letter Respecting our Assossiation —Major L’enfant tells me a...