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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Recipient="Washington, George" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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I hope you have receiv’d my letter from Cramberry where I aquaint you that I am going to hice town tho’ we are schort of provisions—when I got there I was very sorry to hear that Mister hamilton who had been riding all the night had not been able to find any body who could give him certain intelligences—but by a party who comes back I hear the ennemy are in motion, and theyr Rear about one...
From the Bottom of My Heart I Congratulate you upon the Arrival of the French Fleet—Some Rumors Had Been spread, and spy accounts sent out—But no Certainty untill the Admiral’s dispatches Came to Hand—Inclosed I send you His letter and that of Mis. de St Simon Both of whom I Request you will Have translated By Tilmangh or Gouvion alone as there are parts of them personal which I do not choose...
Your letter of the 10th of May is the last one that Came into My Hands for which I Beg leave to offer You My Best thanks—and in Case former Answers do not Arrive, I Must Again tell you How Happy You Made Your friend By Your letters inclosing the proceedings of the Army—In Every instance, My dear General, I Have the Satisfaction to Love and to Admire you—the Conduct You Had on that Occasion was...
I am sorry to hear from Major Gibs that My letter of last Night did not Reach you Before your departure from head quarters—it had been written at one o’clock, as soon as I took my position for the Night, and intrusted to Clel Ogden who promis’d to send it By an officer acquainted with the Roads. depending upon your Communication of the sad intelligence to Cher de la luzerne, I did not send to...
I can not let go back my guide without taking this opportunity of wraiting to your excellency tho’ I have not yet public business to speak of—I go on very slowly some times pierced by rain, sometimes covered with snow, and not thinking many handsome thoughts about the projected incursion into canada —if succèss were to be had it would surprise me in a more agreable manner, by that very reason...
A Man is just Arriv’d at My quarters who says that the Cork fleet Arriv’d in Newyork on Sunday last—his informant saw himself thirty six vessels Coming up—the Man adds that Gnl Smith is gone to the City and suppos’d to embark with this late envoy of troops—But I don’t put a perfect dependance on what he says nor on the inclos’d letter he has Brought me from Merc ereau —I am sure that the...
I have Receiv’d your excellency’s favor notifying your arrival at cramberry and am glad to have anticipated your orders in not going too far—I have felt the unhappy effects of the want of provisions for I dare say if we had not been Stopp’d by it, as we were already within three miles of the ennemy’s rear, we would very easely have overtaken them, and fouht with advantage. I have Consulted the...
to My Great disappointment Mr P—— is Return’d this Morning and Brings no details with him—I Wanted him to Go Again, But You alone Can induce him to do it—from what he Says, the Ennemy are going to undertake A great Movement—he will himself wait on you and tell you what had been Said to him about Rhode island, and what about improving the opportunity of theyr fleet’s going to London—tho I do...
Your orders have reach’d me so late, and found me in such a situation that it will be impossible to follow them as soon as I could wish—it is not on account of any other motive than the impossibility of moving the troops and making Such a march immediately for in receiving your letter I have given up the project of attaking the ennemy, and I only wish to join general lee —I was even going to...
Letter not found: from Maj. Gen. Lafayette, c.30 Oct. 1778. GW wrote Vice Admiral d’Estaing on 31 Oct. : “I received a letter yesterday from the Marquis.”
I have Receiv’d three different Accounts from Newyork, and tho’ the Authorities Are Not unquestionable—I will lay them before you that we May Compare them with other Accounts. A man Sent in By dr Burnet Says that part of the Cork fleet is Arriv’d, betwen twenty and forty Sails—that the Rest is given over for lost—the troops in Newyork about 1500—at Bergen 250—there was an alarm on the 15th at...
As you will Receive a letter from Gal St Clair Who had been desir’d by Congress to Go with me to the Pensilvania line, I have Nothing to add But that I am here with him, and that I Impatiently wait for Your Arrival which has been Announc’d by Mjor Fishburne on his Going through this place. This Affair is the More Serious as the Men have Appointed a Committee Compos’d of Theyr Ring Leaders...
This letter is not By Any Means directed to the Commander in chief, But to My Most Intimate and Confidential friend—I will lay Before you My Circumstances and My wishes—Certain I am You will do whatever You Can for me that is Consistent with Your public duty. When I went to the Southward You know I Had Some private objections—But I Became Sensible of the Necessity there was for the detachement...
I have Sign’d the paper because I have been told I schould Sign it, and because almost all the others who were of the same opinion as I am have also sign’d —for, Sir, I will easely schow you that there were Six gentlemen for more than fifteen hundred and only six for fifteen hundred . they are as follows. general lee baron de Stueben Some of the Second   column were for   2500, but would...
Here is a letter from Mercereau which says very little, and the little which is said in it I don’t take to be true—But thought I had better send his scroll to head Quarters—I have sent him word that there was no monney for such intelligences as these. Captain Ogden told me that one of our Jersay spies had lately writen to you—I have directed him to go to head quarters and report of some thing...
inclos’d I have the honor to send you a letter from General Sullivan which I took the liberty to oppen —if the suppos’d expedition against providence has taken place we can not Come up time enough as to prevent it—but I am Rather inclin’d to believe we wi’ll find the ennemy fortifying themselves, and therefore the Sooner we may begin our visit the better it will be. I have found general Varnum...
This letter will be Handed By cll Morris who waits upon Your Excellency with Gal Greene’s Sentiments upon the different ways to Improve Count de Grasses assistance. I Have Been desired to Add my Accounts But the last letter I Had the Honor to write Has Anticipated the Informations Which Gral Greene wanted me to give. The Light Infantry are 850—the Pennsylvania 600—Virginia exchanged soldiers...
You will be surpris’d to hear that other vessels are arriv’d from France, and that we have not receiv’d by them any public nor private dispatchesall the pacquets were on board the Ariel who was dismasted in the storm and put back into L’orient—Mr de Vauban who was intrusted with these letters thought it not advisable for himself or his pacquets to come on board of Merchant vessels and very...
The Sails are just going to be hoisted, My dear General, and I have But the time of taking my last leave from you—I may now be Certain that Congréss did not intend to Send Any thing more By me—The Navy Board, and Mister Nevill write me this very morning from Boston that the North River is passable, that a gentleman from Camp Says he di’nt hear of any thing like an express for me—all agree to...
The News I have got from france, the Reflexions I have made by myself, and these which have been Suggested to me by many people, particularly by the Admiral, increase more than ever the desire I had of Seeing again your excellency—I want to Communicate you my Sentiments, and take your opinion upon my present Circumstances—that I look upon as of An high moment to my private business and...
that there has been an action fought where I could have been and where I was not, is a thing which will seem as extraordinary to you as it seems so to myself—after a long journey and a longer stay from home (I mean from head quarters) the only satisfactory day I might have finds me in the middle of a town—there I had been sent, push’d, hurri’d by the board of general officers, and principally...
I have Not Yet Receiv’d Your Answer to Any of My letters. Since My last No News have Come to hand. I hope we shall Soon Some Way or other hear from france. After Many debates Congress have elected Clel Laurens as An Envoy to france—But he still Refuses to Go and thinks Hamilton Ought to be Sent. How this will end I do not know—doctor Franklin has a party Against himI think it would be very...
I Can’t let Mons. de la Neuville go to headquarters without Recalling to Your Excellency’s memory an inhabitant of the Eastern Rhode island schore, who long much to be again united with you, and Conceive now great hopes from Sir henry Clinton’s motion to Newport, that you will Come to oppose him in person—I think if we mean to oppose the ennemy in this quarter that more troops are absolutely...
I had this Morning the honor of writing to You By general heath’s express and inform’d you that we had from every official and private quarter minuted accounts of the ennemy’s Coming in Great force to attak this island—for my part, I have been long time a disbeliever of the intelligence—But So many letters Came to hand that at lenght I was forc’d to take the General opinion about theyr...
The bearer of my letter, Chevalier de Lambert, a French gentlemen, will do himself the honor to wait upon you, and I beg leave most earnestly to recommend him to your Excellency’s kind patronage.—You know, my dear General, I have ever been averse to the introduction of foreigners in our army, and since I am in France I have been deaf to every application of that sort. In the present instance,...
from Major Lee I just now hear that he has seen a man who has been in Newyork and told him that an embarkation has certainly taken place, said to be going to Virginia—that he got the intelligence in the City on Monday last, and that dragoons were on Board. A young man that went into the City has lately sent word to his family that he had been press’d on Board a fleet which was going to sail....
I went Yesterday morning to Head Quarters with an intention of Speaking to Your Excellency But You were too Busy and I shall lay down in this letter what I wished to Say. I don’t Need telling You How I am Sorry for all what Happens Since Some time it is a necessary dependence of my most tender and Respectful friendship for You, which affection is as true and Candid as the other Sentiments of...
I alwais forgot mentionning to you what has past Betwen duke of Lauzun and Myself on account of the diminution that had been made in his horses—From what he told me I saw that it has been put upon this footing that you thought a greater number of horses than was necessary for carrying letters &c. would be quite useless—I explain’d the matter to him, told him you had decided that no less than...
On the 5 Ulto I Had the Honor to write You a Letter, and as Count d’Estaing was pleased to let me Have a Vessel to Carry it, I am not without My Hopes to Have Given You the tidings of a General peace—I also Have informed You that Upon My Going to Sail for America, I Had Received a letter from Mr Carmichael Entreating My Immediate Assistance at Madrid—I therefore Gave up My darling Plan, and...
Your letter of the 2d 7ber is just come to Hand. Mine of Yesterday Mentionned that the ships in York River Had gone down. Inclosed is the Account I Receive of an engagement off the Capes. What disposition has been made for the internal protection of the Bay I do not know. Iames River is still guarded but We Have not as Yet Rreceived any letter from Count De Grass relative to His last...
You know, My dear General, that I Am Very Anxious of Seeing the Army well Cloathed for this Campaign—the importance of Such A Measure is on every Account obvious, and from the knowledge I have of the Auxiliary troops that Are Coming I Can so well demonstrate its Necessity, that I shall for the present But Attend to the Means of executing it. in the Space of Six Month (we know from experience)...
The Bearer of this Mr Lavaud Came to Me with a Recommendation from Viscount de Choiseuïl in the West Indias, and an other from Major General Lincoln who By this time Must Be with the Army—He wishes to Serve as A Volonteer, But I told Him that my family was full, and could not Be increased with french aids de Camp—that my detachement was Small, and Had No Room for Volonteers—He then asked me a...
The Embarkation Which I thought and I do Still think to Have Been destined to Newyork Was Reported to Have Sailed up the Bay, and to Be Bound to Baltimore—in Consequence of which I write to Your Excellency, and as I Had not Indulged Myself too Near portsmouth I was able to Cut Across towards Frederiksburg—But instead of Continuing His Voyage up the Bay My Lord Entered York River and Landed at...
You very well know that for Many and Many Reasons Both on account of the Country and on that of the french, I think it very important, nay I might say politically necessary that some thing Brilliant Be at this time perform’d By our troops—to those motives Which are very strongly impressed on My Mind, and which I Might More fully explain in A Conversation, I will add, My dear General, that I...
You Have So often Been pleased to Ask I Would Give My opinion upon Any subject that May occur, that I will this day take the Liberty to Mention a few Articles. I am far from Laughing at the idea of the Ennemy’s Making a Retreat—it is not very probable—But it is not impossible. Indeed they Have no other way to escape—and Since We Cannot get ships above York I would be still more Afraid of a...
Your letter of yesterday is just Come to Hand, and its Contents shall Be ponctually obei’d—the Addition of a Pennsylvania detachement would Be very Advantageous, and I will try to get it under the Circumstances and in the way which you have pointed out—I Had already writen to the Commanding officer of the jersay troops Respecting the detachment, and to Colonel dayton to Request...
Your letter of the 22d Came to hand last evening and I hasten to answer At least to a part of its Contents—I Shall Begin By the disagreable disappointement I met with on Account of our cloathing—inclos’d, my dear General, you will find the Return of what has been put on Board of the fleet which I have sent By a vessel to providence, and which will be forwarded to head quarters as soon as Mr...
Your letter of the 13th is just Come to Hand. The Moment a perfect Intelligence Can Be Got, Major Mcpherson will be Dispatched— But Some Expressions in Your last favor will, if possible, Augment My Vigilance in keeping You well Apprised of the Ennemy’s Movements. There are in Hampton Road Thirty Transport Ships full of troops—Most of them Red Coats— There are eight or ten Brigs which Have...
My Letter of the 23d to Your Excellency will, I Hope, Be Safely transmitted, and the Bearer of it Mjr McLeane Assured me that in case He was obliged to loose the Dispatch Boats, He Could find Means to Get a Shore and forward the Dispatches By Land. In this Letter I Gave to Your Excellency an Account of what Had past Since I Left Annapolis, and Communicated the Intelligence of a British fleet...
Having heard of an Express from Rhodeisland being going through the Continental Village I sent for him as it would not delay him More than an hour—inclosed I have the honor to send you the letter from gal heath which I have oppen’d and also two letters from the french Generals to me—it seems, My dear General, that they have Anticipated the desire you express’d yourself of settling our plans in...
You will be surpris’d to hear that I am yet in this city, and that I Could never get out till this time—My own business were immediately done, and I Receiv’d from Congress all possible Marks of kindness and affection—but public affairs do’nt go quite so fast, and I am detain’d for the expedition of projects, instructions, and Many papers which I am to Carry with me—the zeal for the Common...
I had expected for answering to your first letter that Some thing interesting would have happened that I might Communicate to your Excellency—every day was going to terminate our uncertainties—nay, every day was going to bring the hope of a succés which I did promise myself to acquaint you off—such was the Reason of my differing what my duty and inclination did urge me to do much sooner—I am...
Inclosed You will find some Numbers a Copy of Which I Have kept and Which Contain some Names that May probably Occur in our Correspondance. I Need Not telling you, My dear General, that I will Be Happy in Giving You Every Intelligence in My power, and Reminding You of the Most Affectionate friend You Can Ever Have. The Goodness You Had to take upon Yourself the Communicating to the Virginia...
I have receiv’d your Excellency’s favor by general greene, and have been much pleas’d with the arrival of a gentleman who not only on account of his merit, and the justness of his wiews, but also by his knowledge of the country and his popularity in this state may be very serviceable to the Expedition—I willingly part with the half of my detachement tho’ I had a great dependance upon them, as...
By Former Letters, Your Excellency Has Been Acquainted with My Motions From My Arrival at the Head of Elk, to the time of My Landing at this place. The March of the Detachement to Elk Had Been Very Rapid and performed in the Best order—Owing to the Activity of Lt Clel Stevens a train of Artillery Had Been provided at Philadelphia, and Notwistanding Some Disappointements, Namely that Relating...
After having Stated the few facts that have taken place Between this and the last Meeting of General Officers, and after having given to the Council a Return of the Ennemy’s and our own force on this Continent, Your Excellency wishes to know what plan in our present Circumstances and in the Suppositions we Can Make & would think Better to pursue. In Case we have that Naval Superiority which We...
I am Sorry to think We are not yet Gone, and there Still Remain Some doubts of our Going to Morrow—This delay I Lament not So Much on private Accounts as I do it on the Account of our Next Campaign in the planning of Which Your Opinion as I will deliver it Must Be of Great Use to the Common Cause—As to the departement of foreign affairs I will Be Happy to justify the Confidence of Congress By...
A Correspondant of Mine Servant to Lord Cornwallis writes on the 26th july at Portsmouth, and Says His Master, Tarleton, and Simcoe are Still in town But Expect to Move—the Greatest Part of the Army is Embarked—There is in Hampton Road one 50 guns ship, and two Six and thirty Guns frigats &c. 18 Sloops loaded with Horses—There Remain But Nine vessels in Portsmouth who Appear to Be getting...
Your Excellency having personally seen our dispositions, I shall only give an account of what passed in the execution. Colonel Gimat’s batallion led the van, and was followed by that of Colonel Hamilton’s, who commanded the whole advanced corps, at the same time a party of eighty men, under Col. Laurens, turned the redoubt. I beg leave to refer your Excellency to the report I have received...
the jonction of Lord Cornwallis with the other Army at peters Burg was an Event that from local Circumstances and from thier so Great Superiority it was Impossible to prevent— it took place on the 20th and Having lost Every Hope to Operate a timely stroke in Conjunction with the pennsylvanians, My ideas were Confined to defensive Measures—I therefore Moved up to Richmond where precautions were...