You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Knox, Henry
  • Recipient

    • Washington, George

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Knox, Henry" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
Results 1-10 of 565 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have received your two favors of the 21st and 23d ultimo. They breathe a spirit of friendship and affection which has ever been ardently reciprocated by me. The appointment of the third Major General having been explicity declined by me I have nothing to add on that subject but one single observation. To wit that you are the only decided personal friend who has advised my acceptance of it....
In your welcome and much esteemed favor of the 9th I recognise fully all the substantial friendship and kindness which I have always so invariably experienced from you. My letter of the 29th ultimo was written under a pressure of various ideas, all sharp’ned by a strong sense of the comparison which had been publickly made between others and myself and in consequence the inferior station which...
(Private) My dear Sir Boston 29 July 1798. Yesterday I received your favor of the 16th instant, which I opened with all the delightful sensations of affection which I always before experienced upon the receipt of your letters. But I found on its perusal, a striking instance of that vicissitude of human affairs and friendships, which you so justly describe. I read it with astonishment, which...
Possessing as I do a thousand evidences of your friendship, I am persuaded that you will readily beleive me, when I say that my silence of late, has been the effect of my unwillingness to intrude, lest I should for a moment prevent the consideration and different views, you give to the important subjects incessantly before you. Although the same cause continues to prevent my interruption, yet...
I have received your kind favor of the 4th instant. I shall always regret every circumstance which may obstruct a compliance with your wishes public or private. The Appointment of Commissioner would mar most effectually my plans for the Summer, and which are now in an expensive train of execution. There is another circumstance which I confess confidentially, has a considerable influence on my...
I have been requested by several respectable characters in this place, to name for your consideraton Christopher Gore Esqr. of this vicinity as a suitable character for one of the Commissioners to repair to Great Britain in pursuance of the late treaty. I before took the liberty of suggesting his name upon another occasion, and to express my conviction, of his fitness, for high confidential...
I cannot refrain from trespassing on Your time by expressing to you the perfect satisfaction which the people of New England possess by the operations of the general goverment. The unanimity of the legislature of this state was such as to overbear all dispositions of a disorganizing nature. Had the legislature conceived it proper or constitutional they would have expressed their approbation in...
In addressing myself to you I experience the mingled emotions of respect and affection, the former repelling lest I should intrude, and the latter attracting me to hold conversation with you, whom independent of all political considerations, and situations, I shall ever hold dear to my soul. Having overcome my reluctance to break in upon your important affairs, I shall truly state to you the...
I have the honor to enclose you the opinion of James Seagrove agent for the Creek Nation upon the subject of the negroes which ought to have been returned in pursuance of the treaty of New York. I beg leave to add that if the United States deem it inexpedient to press for a return of the negroes that it would appear proper that the owners should be compensated conformably to some equitable...
Mr Stagg has mentioned your observations respecting the difference between the five thousand dollars stipulated, and the seven thousand implied—The facts are truly stated in the proceedings —The indians were, as there mentioned, told that the two thousand, and indeed the whole, would depend on their attachment and good dispositions; but that I was not authorised to stipulate more than five...