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    • Knox, Henry
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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Knox, Henry" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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I arriv’d here last saturday morning and immediately made inquiry whether Colo. Read had done any thing in the buissness with which he was charg’d—I found his Stay had been short during which time the Committee that sit during the recess of Congress could not be gotten together so that he went away without being able to forward the matter—The Committee met Yesterday and after having consider’d...
I arriv’d here Yesterday & made preparation to go over the lake this morning but General Schuyler reaching here before day prevents my going over for an hour or two. He has given me a list of Stores on the other side from which I am enabled to send an Inventory of those which I intend to forward to Camp —The Garriso⟨n⟩ at Ticonderoga is so weak, The conveyance from the fort to the landing is...
I returnd from Ticonderoga to this place on the 15th instant & brought with me the Cannon &c. It having taken nearly the time I conjecturd it would to transport them here —It is not easy to conceive the difficulties we have had in getting them over the lake owing to the advanced Season of the Year & contrary winds—three days ago it was very uncertain whether we could have gotten them over...
I did myself the honor to address your Excellncy from Fort George on the 17 Ult.—I then was in hopes that we should have been able to have had the Cannon at Cambridge by this time the want of Snow detain’d us some days & now a cruel thaw, hinders from Crossing Hudsons River which we are oblig’d to do four times from Lake George to this Town—the first severe night will make the Ice on the river...
Agreable to your Excellencys Instructions I tarried at Cambridge ’till all the Ordnance & Stores in my department were on the way to this place, which to my great mortification was not till the 14th instant—The detention was owing to the Zeal of the General Assembly which promis’d more than their activity could perform —In my passing thro’ Providence Governor Cook & a number of the principal...
In consequence of your Excellencys directions I am employ’d in looking at and getting the necessary information Respecting this harbour in which I shall Spare no pains. I mention’d to Your Excellency Newport Harbour, which in Conjunction with this will when fortified afford a safe retreat to the American Navy or their prizes in any Wind that blows; they are equally convenient for Ships coming...
Your Excellency will please to observe by the above summary that there are now mounted and fit for action in this City and the neighbouring posts one hundred and twenty one heavy and light Cannon. To each Cannon it will be necessary to have ten men including the mortar and contingent Services. this would make twelve hundred an[d] ten men. we have in the regiment six hundred officers included,...
From a view of the present important contest with Great Britain it appears that the war is but in its infancy. To carry it on with vigour and success a well regulated and numerous body of Artillery will be necessary. The present number of officers and men of the Regiment of Artillery here are not sufficient for the posts in and round about this City. To supply this deficiency a number of men...
I understood that some few Cannon were to be taken from Mount Washington for Kings Bridge for the present—we find great difficulty in procuring the Carriages for General Fellowss encampment—the Greatest part of which I hope will be Completed to day and tomorrow after which we will turn our whole endevors to Complete those for Kings Bridge. I am with Great Respect Your Excellencys Most Obt &...
Agreable to your directions, we view’d the hill, East of Mount Washington, & the camp in general, & beg leave to make the following report Viz. That the highest part of said hill, be secured by a fort, principally made of the timber now standing there, strengthened with a good abattis, form’d of the tops of the trees, which are to be cut down; And that on the North part of the hill, a redoubt...