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I imagine your Excellency has been informed that in consequence of the resolution of Congress for granting commissions to Aide De Camps appointed under the former establishment, I have obtained one of Lieutenant Colonel in the army of the United States, bearing rank since the 1st of March 1777. It is become necessary to me to apply to your Excellency to know in what manner you foresee you will...
I am extremely sorry to have embarrassed you by my late application, and that you should think there are insuperable obstacles to a compliance with it. Having renounced my expectations, I have no other inducement for troubling Your Excellency with a second letter, than to obviate the appearance of having desired a thing inconsistent with the good of the service, while I was acquainted with the...
I am extremely sorry to have embarrassed you by my late application, and that you should think there are insuperable obstacles to a compliance with it. Having renounced my expectations, I have no other inducement for troubling Your Excellency with a second letter, than to obviate the appearance of having desired a thing inconsistent with the good of the service, while I was acquainted with the...
The other day I applied to Col. Tilghman for an order for Shoes for the Two Companies of levies. He thought on a general principle it could not be granted; but as from the best of my own recollection confirmed by inquiry of others, I have reason to believe a distinction was made last campaign in favour of the advanced corps; in the case of Cortland’s regiment, I am induced to submit the matter...
The other day I applied to Col. Tilghman for an order for Shoes for the Two Companies of levies. He thought on a general principle it could not be granted; but as from the best of my own recollection confirmed by inquiry of others, I have reason to believe a distinction was made last campaign in favour of the advanced corps; in the case of Cortland’s regiment, I am induced to submit the matter...
I need not observe to yr Excellency that, Respect for the opinion of Congress will not permit me to be indifferent to the impressions they may receive of my conduct. On this principle, though I do not think the subject of the inclosed letter of sufficient importance to request an official communication of it, yet I should be happy it might in some way be known to the members of that honorable...
Your Excellency will, I am persuaded, readily admit the force of this sentiment, that though it is the duty of a good citizen to devote his services to the public, when it has occasion for them, he cannot with propriety, or delicacy to himself, obtrude them, when it either has, or appears to have none. The difficuties I experienced last campaign in obtaining a command will not suffer me to...
Your Excellency will, I am persuaded, readily admit the force of this sentiment, that though it is the duty of a good citizen to devote his services to the public, when it has occasion for them, he cannot with propriety, or delicacy to himself, obtrude them, when it either has, or appears to have none. The difficulties I experienced last campaign in obtaining a Command will not suffer me to...
Flattering myself that your knowlege of me will induce you to receive the observations I mak⟨e⟩ as dictated by a regard to the public good, I take the liber⟨ty⟩ to suggest to you my ideas on some matters of delicacy and importance. I view the present juncture as a very interesting one. I need not observe how far the temper and situation of the army make it so. The stat⟨e⟩ of our finances was...
Flattering myself that your knowlege of me will induce you to receive the observations I make as dictated by a regard to the public good, I take the liberty to suggest to you my ideas on some matters of delicacy and importance. I view the present juncture as a very interesting one—I need not observe how far the temper and situation of the army make it so—The state of our finances was perhaps...
[ Philadelphia, February 24, 1783. The description of this letter reads: “Referring to a plan for carrying the 8th article of the confederation into execution, etc.” Letter not found. ] Luther S. Livingston, ed., American Book-Prices Current (New York, 1906), 717. See the first and second “Continental Congress. Motion on Evaluation of State Lands for Carrying into Effect Article 8 of the...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency lately on a very confidential subjec⟨t⟩ and shall be anxious to know as soon as c⟨on⟩venient whether the letter got safe to han⟨d⟩. The bearer Shattuck thinks he can poin⟨t⟩ out the means of apprehending Wells & Knowle⟨ton⟩ the two persons whom Your Excellency was authorised to have taken into custody. I hav⟨e⟩ desired him to call upon you to...
I had the honor of writing to your Excellency lately on a very confidential subject and shall be anxious to know as soon as convenient whether the letter got safe to hand. The bearer Shattuck thinks he can point out the means of apprehending Wells & Knowl ton the two persons whom Your Excellency was authorised to have taken into custody. I have desired him to call upon you to disclose the...
I am duely honored with Your Excellency’s letter of the 4th. and, 12th. instant. It is much to be regretted though not to be wondered at, that steps of so inflammatory a tendency have been taken in the army. Your Excellency has in my opinion acted wisely. The best way is ever not to attempt to stem a torrent but to divert it. I am happy to find You coincide in opinion with me on the conduct...
[ Philadelphia, March 17, 1783. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries. Two letters from H to Washington on March 17, 1783, are listed. One letter is printed in PAH Harold C. Syrett, ed., The Papers of Alexander Hamilton (New York and London, 1961– ). , III, 290–93.
I am duely honored with Your Excellency’s letter of the 4th and 12th instant—It is much to be regretted though not to be wondered at, that steps of so inflammatory a tendency have been taken in the army—Your Excellency has in my opinion acted wisely—The best way is ever not to attempt to stem a torrent but to divert it. I am happy to find You coincide—in opinion with me on the conduct proper...
Your Excellency will before this reaches you have received a letter from the Marquis De la Fayette informing you that the preliminaries of peace between all the belligerent powers have been concluded. I congratulate your Excellency on this happy conclusion of your labours. It now only remains to make solid establishments within to perpetuate our union to prevent our being a ball in the hands...
Your Excellency will before this reaches you have received a letter from the Marquis De la Fayette informing you that the preliminaries of peace between all the belligerent powers have been concluded—I congratulate your Excellency on this happy conclusion of your labours—It now only remains to make solid establishments within to perpetuate our union to prevent our being a ball in the hands of...
The inclosed I write more in a public than in a private capacity. Here I write as a citizen zealous for the true happiness of this country, as a soldier who feels what is due to an army which has suffered everything and done much for the safety of America. I sincerly wish ingratitude was not so natural to the human heart as it is. I sincerely wish there were no seeds of it in those who direct...
I wrote to Your Excellency a day or two ago by express. Since that a Committee appointed on the communications from you have had a meeting, and find themselves embarrassed. They have requested me to communicate our embarrassments to you in confidence and to ask your private opinion. The army by their resolutions express an expectation that Congress will not disband them previous to a...
I wrote to Your Excellency a day or two ago by express—Since that a Committee appointed on the communications from you have had a meeting, and find themselves embarrassed. They have requested me to communicate our embarrassments to you in confidence and to ask your private opinion. The army by their resolutions express an expectation that Congress will not disband them previous to a settlement...
The inclosed I write more in a public than in a private capacity—Here I write as a citizen zealous for the true happiness of this country—as a soldier who feels what is due to an army which has suffered every thing and done much for the safety of America. I sincerly wish ingratitude was not so natural to the human heart as it is—I sincerely wish there were no seeds of it in those who direct...
I have received your Excellency’s letters of the 31st of March & 4th. of April, the last to day. The one to Col Bland as member of the Committee has been read in Committee confidentially and gave great satisfaction. The idea of not attempting to separate the army before the settlement of accounts corresponds with my proposition. That of endeavouring to let them have some pay had also appeared...
I have received your Excellency’s letters of the 31st of March & 4th of April, the last to day—The one to Col. Bland as members of the Committee has been read in Committee confidentially and gave great satisfaction. The idea of not attempting to separate the army before the settlement of accounts corresponds with my proposition—That of endeavouring to let them have some pay had also appeared...
Congress having appointed a committee consisting of Messrs. Maddison Osgood, Wilson, Elseworth and myself to consider what arrangements it will be proper to adopt in the different departments with reference to a peace; I am directed by the Committee to address your Excellency on the subject of the military department. The Committee wish Your Excellency’s sentiments at large on such...
Congress having appointed a committee consisting of Messrs Maddison Osgood, Wilson, Elseworth and myself to consider what arrangements it will be proper to adopt in the different departments with reference to a plan; I am directed by the Committee to address your Excellency on the subject of the military Department. The Committee wish Your Excellency’s sentiments at large on such institutions...
There are two resolutions passed relative to the restoration of the British Prisoners and to making arrangements for the surrender of the posts in the possession of the British troops, the first of which is to be transacted by you in conjunction with the secretary of War—the latter by yourself alone. I will explain to you some doubts which have arisen in Congress with regard to the true...
There are two resolutions passed relative to the restoration of the British Prisoners and to making arrangements for the surrender of the posts in the possession of the British troops, the first of which is to be transacted by you in conjunction with the secretary of War—the latter by yourself alone. I will explain to you some doubts which have arisen in Congress with regard to the true...
I think I may address the subject of this letter to Your Excellency with more propriety than to any other person, as it is purely of a military nature, as you are best acquainted with my services as an officer, and as you are now engaged in assisting to form the arrangements for the future peace establishment. Your Excellency knows that in March 82, I relinquished all claim to any future...
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful, and I have intire confidence that you will do me...
As I flatter myself I may indulge a consciousness that my services have been of some value to the public, at least enough to merit the small compensation I wish, I will make no apology to your Excellency for conveying through you that wish to Congress. You are able to inform them if they wish information, in what degree I may have been useful— and I have entire confidence that you will do me...
I am requested by Mr. Oudinarde to transmit you the Inclosed Account. I observed to him that it was a little extraordinary the account had not been presented before; and that it was probable your accounts with the public had been long since closed, and that, by the delay, you may have lost the opportunity of making it a public charge, as it ought to have been. But as the person was very...
I am requested by Mr Oudinarde to transmit you the Inclosed Account —I observed to him that it was a little extraordinary the account had not been presented before; and that it was probable your accounts with the public had been long since closed, and that, by the delay, you may have lost the oppurtunity of making it a public charge, as it ought to have been. But as the person was very...
Major Fairly is just setting out on a visit to You I believe on some business relating to the Cinninnati. The society of this state met some short time since and took into consideration the proposed alterations in the original frame of the Institution. Some were strenuous for adhering to the old constitution a few for adopting the new and many for a middle line. This disagreement of opinion...
Major Fairly is just setting out on a visit to You I believe on some business relating to the Cincinnati—The society of this state met some short time since and took into consideration the proposed alterations in the original frame of the Institution— Some were strenuous for adhering to the old constitution a few for adopting the new and many for a middle line—This disagreement of opinion and...
In my passage through the Jerseys and since my arrival here I have taken particular pains to discover the public sentiment and I am more and more convinced that this is the critical opportunity for establishing the prosperity of this country on a solid foundation. I have conversed with men of information not only of this City but from different parts of the state; and they agree that there has...
In my passage through the Jerseys and since my arrival here I have taken particular pains to discover the public sentiment and I am more and more convinced that this is the critical opportunity for establishing the prosperity of this country on a solid foundation—I have conversed with men of information not only of this City but from different parts of the state; and they agree that there has...
You probably saw some time since some animadversions on certain expressions of Governor Clinton respecting the Convention—You may have seen a piece signed a Republican, attempting to bring the fact into question and endeavouring to controvert the conclusions drawn from it, if true—My answer you will find in the inclosed. I trouble you with it merely from that anxiety which is natural to every...
You probably saw some time since some animadversions on certain expressions of Governor Clinton respecting the Convention. You may have seen a piece signed a Republican, attempting to bring the fact into question and endeavouring to controvert the conclusions drawn from it, if true. My answer you will find in the inclosed. I trouble you with it merely from that anxiety which is natural to...
I am much obliged to Your Excellency for the explicit manner in which you contradict the insinuations mentioned in my last letter. The only use I shall make of your answer will be to put it into the hands of a few friends. The constitution proposed has in this state warm friends and warm enemies. The first impressions every where are in its favour; but the artillery of its opponents makes some...
I am much obliged to Your Excellency for the explicit manner in which you contradict the insinuations mentioned in my last letter—The only use I shall make of your answer will be to put it into the hands of a few friends. The constitution proposed has in this state warm friends and warm enemies. The first impressions every where are in its favour; but the artillery of its opponents makes some...
Capt Cochran of the British navy has requested my aid in recovering a family watch worn by his brother, who fell at York Town, (and now in the possession of _____ _____). In compliance with his request I have written the letter herewith (to_____ _____) which I take the liberty to convey through you, in hope that if you see no impropriety in it, you would add your influence to the endeavour to...
Capt. Cochran of the British navy has requested my aid in recovering a family watch worn by his brother, who fell at York Town, (and now in the possession of —— ——). In compliance with this request I have written the letter herewith to —— —— which I take the liberty to convey through you, in hope that if you see no impropriety in it, you would add your influence to the endeavour to gratify...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto. came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...
Your Excellency’s friendly and obliging letter of the 28th Ulto came safely to hand. I thank you for your assurance of seconding my application to General Morgan. The truth of that affair is, that he purchased the watch for a trifle of a British soldier, who plundered Major Cochran at the moment of his fall at York Town. I should be deeply pained my Dear Sir if your scruples in regard to a...
Your two last letters have duly come to hand & the Count De Moustier has delivered me the watch you committed to his charge. Your obliging attention to this matter claims my particular acknowlegements. I will make no apology for asking you to take the additional trouble of forwarding the inclosed to the General. I take the liberty of passing it through you that you may by perusing the contents...
Your last two letters have duly come to hand & the Count De Moustier has delivered me the watch you committed to his charge. Your obliging attention to this matter claims my particular acknowledgements. I will make no apology for asking you to take the additional trouble of forwarding the inclosed to the General—I take the liberty of passing it through you that you may by perusing the contents...
Mr. Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , Photostat, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
Mr Hamilton will with pleasure execute the command of the President by the time appointed and have the honor of waiting upon him. AL , CtY .
In conformity to the intimation you were pleased to honor me with on evening last I have reflected on the etiquette proper to be observed by the President and now submit the ideas which have occurred to me on the subject. The public good requires as a primary object that the dignity of the office should be supported. Whatever is essential to this ought to be pursued though at the risk of...