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[ New York ] April 20, 1776 . The return is headed: “A Return of the Colony Company of Artillery commanded by Alexander Hamilton April 20th, 1776” and is in the form of a table showing the number of each rank present and fit for duty, sick, on furlough, on command duty, or taken as prisoner. Hamilton’s company contained a total of 69 commissioned and noncommissioned officers. AD , George...
paid at Christiana for family’s breakfast, horses &c.— £6.5  paid on the road from thence to Wilmington for lodging &c— 6.   paid for breakfast the morning we crossed brandywine— 1.12 pd.  1.12 15.9  Received the above from Capt Gibbs ADS , Hamilton Papers George Washington Papers , Library of Congress. Town on creek of same name, which flows into the Delaware near Wilmington. I.e.,...
I lodged last night in the neighbourhood of New Windsor. This morning early, I met Col: Morgan with his corps about a mile from it, in march for Head Quarters. I told him the necessity of making all the dispatch he could so as not to fatigue his men too much, which he has promised to do. I understood from Col: Morgan that all the Northern army were marching down on both sides the River, and...
I arrived here yesterday at Noon and waited upon General Gates immediately on the business of my mission; but was sorry to find his ideas did not correspond with yours for drawing off the number of troops you directed. I used every argument in my power to convince him of the propriety of the measure, but he was inflexible in the opinion that two Brigades at least of Continental troops should...
I arrived here last night from Albany. Having given General Gates a little time to recollect himself I renewed my remonstrances on the necessity and propriety of sending you more than one Brigade of the three he had detained with him, and finally prevailed upon him to give orders for Glover’s in addition to Patterson’s brigade to march this way. As it was thought conducive to expedition to...
I have been detained here these two days by a fever and violent rheumatic pains throughout my body. This has prevented my being active in person for promoting the purposes of my errand, but I have taken every other method in my power, in which Governor Clinton has obligingly given me all the aid he could. In answer to my pressing application to General Poor for the immediate marching of his...
[ New Windsor, New York, November 12, 1777. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries. Two letters from H to Washington on November 12, 1777, are listed. One of these letters is printed in PAH Harold C. Syrett, ed., The Papers of Alexander Hamilton (New York and London, 1961– ). , I, 360–62.
I arrived at this place last night and unfortunately find myself unable to proceed any further. Imagining I had gotten the better of my complaints while confined at Governor Clinton’s & anxious to be about, attending to the march of the troops, the day before yesterday I crossed the ferry in order to fall in with General Glover’s brigade which was on its march from Poughkepsie to Fish Kill. I...
There are still existing in the army so many abuses absolutely contrary to the military constitution, that, without a speedy stop is put to them, it will be impossible even to establish any order or discipline among the troops. I would, therefore, propose the following Regulations; submitting to His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief, to distinguish such as may be published under his own...
[ Valley Forge ] January 29, 1778. Receipt for payment of $100 by Washington to Hamilton for Hamilton’s expenses at Morristown. DS , George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
To His Excellency George Washington Esquire, General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of America. We, the Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency, “to confer, determine and agree upon a Treaty and Convention, for the exchange of Prisoners of War, and for all matters whatsoever, which may be properly contained therein” beg leave to report— That in pursuance of Your...
To His Excellency George Washington Esquire General and Commander in chief of the Forces of the United States of America. We the Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency, “to confer, determine and agree upon a Treaty and Convention for the exchange of Prisoners of War, and for all matters whatsoever which may be properly contained therein,” beg leave to report— That, agreeable to Your...
[ Hopewell, New Jersey, June 23, 1778. Letter not found. ] “List of Letters from General Hamilton to General Washington,” Columbia University Libraries.
We have halted the troops at this place. The enemy, by our last reports, were four miles from this (that is their rear) and had passed the road which turns off towards South Amboy, which determines their rout[e] towards Shrewsbury. Our reason for halting is the extreme distress of the troops for want of provisions. General Wayne’s detachment is almost starving and seem both unwilling and...
The result of what I have seen and heard concerning the enemy is, that they have incamped with their van a little beyond Monmouth Court House and their rear at Manalapans River abt. seven miles from this place. Their march to day has been very judiciously conducted—their baggage in front and their flying army in the rear, with a rear guard of 1000 men about 400 paces from the main body. To...
We have halted the troops at this place. The enemy, by our last reports, were four miles from this (that is their rear) and had passed the road which turns off towards South Amboy, which determines their rout towards Shrewsbury. Our reason for halting is the extreme distress of the troops for want of provisions—General Wayne’s detachment is almost starving—and seem both unwilling and unable to...
Inclosed I transmit your Excellency a letter from the Count Destain. He has had the River sounded and finds he cannot enter. He will sail for Rhode Island tomorrow evening; in the mean time he is making demonstrations to deceive the enemy and beget an opinion that he intends to operate in this quarter. He would sail immediately but he waits the arrival, or to hear, of a frigate which carried...
Inclosed I transmit your Excellency a letter from the Count Destain. He has had the River sounded and finds he cannot enter. He will sail for Rhode Island tomorrow evening; in the mean time he is making demonstrations to deceive the enemy and beget an opinion, that he intends to operate in this quarter. He would sail immediately but he waits the arrival, or to hear, of a frigate which carried...
I wrote to your Excellency the evening of the 20th. by Major Neville. I remained in the neighbourhood of Black Point ’till the afternoon following. The Count had received his expected dispatches from Congress and was to sail, as I mentioned before, the first fair wind. At Brunswick yesterday, Mr Caldwell joined me. He was immediately from the Point and brought intelligence that the fleet got...
I wrote to Your Excellency the evening of the 20th by Major Neville. I remained in the neighbourhood of Black Point ’till the afternoon following. The Count had received his expected dispatches from Congress and was to sail, as I mentioned before, the first fair wind. At Brunswick yesterday, Mr Caldwell joined me. He was immediately from the Point and brought intelligence that the fleet got...
Report of Lieutenant Colonels, Robert Hanson Harrison & Alexander Hamilton Commissioners &ca. To His Excellency General Washington— We, the Commissioners appointed by your Excellency for the purposes specified in the powers to us given on the 30th of November last—Beg leave to Report— That in pursuance of your instructions, we repaired to Amboy on Monday the 7th instant at 11 oClock; where we...
We are honored with two letters from Your Excellency of the 10th. and 21st to the contents of which we beg leave to assure you of our strictest attention. That of the 18th. is not yet come to hand, it is not improbable it has gone round by Lewis Town, which has occasioned the delay. Col Hamilton wrote to your Excellency from Philadelphia acquainting you with our arrival there and our intention...
We are honored with two letters from Your Excellency of the 10th and 21st; to the contents of which we beg leave to assure you of our strictest attention—That of the 18th is not yet come to hand—it is not improbable it has gone round by Lewis Town, which has occasioned the delay. Col. Hamilton wrote to Your Excellency from Philadelphia acquainti⟨ng⟩ you with our arrival there and our intention...
[ Great Egg Harbor Landing, New Jersey, November 1, 1779. On November 8, Brigadier General Du Portail and Hamilton wrote to Washington : “We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant.” Letter of November 1 not found .]
Letter not found: from Brigadier General Duportail and Lt. Col. Alexander Hamilton, 1 Nov. 1779 . Duportail and Hamilton wrote GW on 8 Nov.: “We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant.”
We last night received the honor of Your Excellency’s letter of the 25th. of October; on the 26th. we had the pleasure of advising you fully of our situation and motives for coming to this place. We have since received no further intelligence of the Count, his operations, or ultimate intentions; on which account and from the late period of the season, we have given over all expectation of any...
We last night received the honor of Your Excellency’s letter of the 25th of October—On the 26th we had the pleasure of advising you fully of our situation and motives for coming to this place. We have since received no further intelligence of the Count—his operations—or ultimate intentions; on which account and from the late period of the season, we have given over all expectation of any thing...
Your Excellency’s letter of the 30th. of October reached us yesterday. We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant. We have received no late advices from the Southward, which confirms us in the ideas of our last. Major Lee will no doubt have communicated to Your Excellency what he mentions to us, that the enemy are preparing at New York for...
Your Excellencys letter of the 30th of October reached us yesterday. We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant. We have received no late advices from the Southward, which confirms us in the ideas of our last—Major Lee will no doubt have communicated to Your Excellency what he mentions to us, that the enemy are preparing at New York for a...
On our present plan, It appears to me the quantity of ammunition proposed by General Knox for the Artillery is insufficient. A larger consumption may be necessary. The Stone house, in which the enemy may attempt to defend themselves may be obstinate and we should have it in our power by the severity and duration of our fire to bring them to reason. I take the liberty to suggest these matters,...
On our present plan, It appears to me the quantity of ammunition proposed by General Knox for the Artillery is insufficient. A larger consumption may be necessary—The Stone houses in which the enemy may attempt to defend themselves may be obstinate and we should have it in our power by the severity and duration of our fire to bring them to reason. I take the liberty to suggest these matters,...
I duly received your letter of the 14th. and shall not fail in conjunction with General St Clair to attend to the military object of it. I am much obliged to your Excellency for the communication of your Southern advices. The enemy are still in the dark about their fleet and army gone that way as we gather from the Commissioners. They pretend to have little European news, though a vessel...
I duly received your letter of the 14th and shall not fail in conjunction with General St Clair to attend to the military object of it. I am much obliged to your Excellency for the communication of your Southern advises—The enemy are still in the dark about their fleet and army gone that way as we gather from the Commissioners —They pretend to have little European news, though a vessel arrived...
I duly received your letter of the 14th and shall not fail in conjunction with General St Clair to attend to the military object of it. I am much obliged to your Excellency for the communication of your Southern adviser—The enemy are still in the dark about their fleet and army gone that way as we gather from the Commissioners—They pretend to have little European news, though a vessel arrived...
Plan of exchange for the Troops of Convention, in three Divisions to be formed as equally, as the exchanging by Corps will allow, from the Strength of the Rank & file, each of the two first Divisions to have a Major General and a Brigadier General, and the third The Lieutenant General and a Brigadier General exchanged with them. The Regiments to which the Brigadier Generals belong to be...
To His Excellency George Washington Esqr. General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of The United States of America. We The Commissioners appointed by Your Excellency “to treat, confer, determine and conclude upon a General Cartel for the exchange and accommodation of prisoners of war including the troops of The Convention of Saratoga and all matters whatsoever which might be properly...
In addition to the official report of our proceedings at Amboy, which your Excellency will perceive have terminated in the manner you expected, we have the honor to give you an account of the steps we took, in consequence of the second part of your instructions, relative to a private conversation. But before we enter upon this, we think it our duty to inform you, that we have every reason to...
 3 Brigadiers at 200 600 11 Colonels 100 1100  5 Majors 28 140 20 Captains 16 320 56 first Lieutenants 6 336 72 second Lieutenants and Ensigns—     4   288 2784  9 Reg Qr. Mrs. & Adjutants,
We beg leave to inform Your Excellency, that in the private report of our proceedings at Amboy dated the 26th. March, we omitted mentioning, (though it is to be inferred) that in the conversation which passed on the subject of accounts, it was explicitly declared by us, that if any particular sum should be accepted agreeable to the ideas of The British Gentlemen, it was not in any manner to be...
I am extremely sorry your Excellency has been troubled with the affair to which the papers transmitted in your letter of this morning relate. Admitting the possibility of Doctor Gordons not being the author of what I must always call a calumny, and had he not been an irreconcileable enemy to plain dealing, the matter might have been brought to a very easy issue, without the necessity of an...
I am extremely sorry your Excellency has been troubled with the affair to which the papers transmitted in your letter of this morning relate. Admitting the possibility of Doctor Gordons not being the author of what I must always call a calumny, and had he not been an irreconcileable enemy to plain dealing, the matter might have been brought to a very easy issue, without the necessity of an...
I am extremely sorry your Excellency has been troubled with the affair to which the papers transmitted in your letter of this morning relate. Admitting the possibility of Doctor Gordons not being the author of what I must always call a calumny, and had he not been an irreconcileable enemy to plain dealing, the matter might have been brought to a very easy issue, without the necessity of an...
I have seen the enemy; those in view I calculate at about three thousand; there may be and probably enough are others out of sight. They have sent all their horse to the other side except about fifty or sixty. Their baggage it is agreed on all hands has also been sent across and their wounded. It is not ascertained that any of their infantry have passed to the other side. There are four or...
I have seen the enemy; those in view I calculate at about three thousand—there may be and probably enough are others out of sight—They have sent all their horse to the other side except about fifty or sixty—Their baggage it is agreed on all hands has also been sent across and their wounded—It is not ascertained that any of their infantry have passed to the other side—There are four or five...
You will see by the inclosed we are too late. Arnold went by water to the Vulture. I shall write to General Greene advising him without making a bustle to be in readiness to march and even to detach a Brigade this way, for though I do not believe the project will go on, it is possible Arnold has made such dispositions with the Garrison as may tempt the enemy in its present weakness to make the...
You will see by the inclosed we are too late—Arnold went by water to the Vulture—I shall write to General Greene advising him without making a bustle to be in readiness to march and even to detach a Brigade this way for though I do not believe the project will go on, it is possible Arnold has made such dispositions with the Garrison as may tempt the enemy in its present weakness to make the...
Sometime last fall when I spoke to your Excellency about going to the Southward, I explained to you candidly my feelings with respect to military reputation, and how much it was my object to act a conspicuous part in some enterprise that might perhaps raise my character as a soldier above mediocrity. You were so good as to say you would be glad to furnish me with an occasion. When the...
Sometime last fall when I spoke to your Excellency about going to the Southward, I explained to you candidly my feelings with respect to military reputation, and how much it was my object to act a conspicuous part in some enterprise that might perhaps raise my character as a soldier above mediocrity. You were so good as to say you would be glad to furnish me with an occasion. When the...
Mr. Renselaar who has the direction of the Armory here tells me that the Board of War, write him they are unable to support it any longer, on the present establishment for want of supplies and propose to him to endeavour to have it carried on by contract. This he declares is impossible. The armory must either continue on the present footing or cease. As far as I understand the matter, there is...
Mr Renselaar who has the direction of the Armory here tells me that the Board of War, write him they are unable to support it any longer, on the present establishment for want of supplies—and propose to him to endeavour to have it carried on by contract. This he declares is impossible—The armory must either continue on the present footing or cease. As far as I understand the matter, there is...