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    • Greene, Nathanael
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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Greene, Nathanael" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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I do my self the honor to inclose your Excellency a piece of intelligence given by Col. Abeel, who seems to be very positive that the facts stated, are well grounded. Great allowances are to be made for the natural credulity of his temper, and his general inclination to deal in the marvellous; yet I think the information ought not be altogether neglected. It is natural to suppose the Enemy...
From the Situation in which I found the Quarter Master General’s Department on my entering upon the Office, which is not unknown to your Excellency, it appeared to be absolutely necessary to make very extensive & speedy Preparations for the ensuing Campaign, especially in Horses, Teams, Tents, and other Articles of high Price. In Consequence of this apparent Necessity, I have given extensive...
To locate the army to any particular spots, may facilitate the Enemies getting possession of advantageous grounds, either upon one or the other of our flanks. It appears to us more proper therefore, that we move the troops upon the high and advantageous grounds, according as the motions of the enemy may indicate an intention to make an impression at particular places. Having examined the...
Colo. Hand Reports thirty Sail of Ships standing in for the Hook. Perhaps this may be part of the foreign Troops. I detacht for the Galleys between forty & fifty men yesterday. Two Companies that have been with Col. Foremans Regiment are gone from this post to Join their Regiment under General Heard. The Troops in general are exceeding Sickly, great numbers taken down every day. If the state...
I am inform’d a large body of the Enemies Troop have landed at Froggs point. If so I suppose the Troops here will be wanted there. I have three Brigades in readiness to reinforce you; General Clintons Brigade will march first. General Nixons next and then the Troops under the command of General Roberdeau. I dont Apprehend any danger from this quarter at present[.] if the force on your side are...
Inclosed is Colo. Biddles Letter to me upon the distressed state of the Forage Department. Our Cattle for this ten days past have not had one half the necessary allowance of Forage. The Resolution of Congress prohibiting the use of Wheat and the Restrictive Laws in the several States, in the Neighbourhood of Camp, renders it impossible to subsist the Cattle, unless some further aid can be...
I am now sick with a fever and almost blind with sore Eyes. I only write this Leter to apoligize for not writing. Mrs Greene who will have the pleasure of delivering this letter embarks to day for Philadelphia. Her health is so much improved I am anxious to get her to the Northward notwithstanding my own situation. Mrs Greene will deliver your Excellency a Green silk embroidered pattern for a...
I wrote your Excellency yesterday that I was afraid we had lost one of our small parties, but they came in a few minutes after I sent the Letter off—Has there been any great desertions from Camp, or any report of prisoners made on the other side of the Schuylkill—I am perswaded, there was some of our prisoners paraded for some purpose—If there has been no report of any being lately taken they...
The Enemy are out and on their march towards this place in full force, having receivd a considerable reinforcement last night, as Capt. Dayton says he was desird by Major Lee to inform me. Col. Dayton this moment sends me intelligence, that the Enemy’s Artillery and baggage are on the Newark Road, and the Troops pushing out this way, are to cover them. If this is true we shall hear more about...
Major Giles who served with General Morgan as an Aid in the battle of the Cowpens is desirous of serving as a volunteer Aid in your Excellencys family during the operations in Virginia. I beg leave to recommend him to your Excellencys notice as a young Gentleman of merit and good sense, adorned with a liberal education and of a good disposition accompanied with a degree of prudence and...