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    • Gordon, William
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    • Washington, George

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Your friendly letter of 15th Ocr last was highly acceptable, but before I enter upon a particular answer I mean to transcribe one of our friend Monsr La Fayette’s dated two days before. Upon hearing He was safe in the neighbourhood of Hamburgh I wrote to him on the 9th of Novr to which he answered from Lehmkhul near Ploin, as follows “My dear Sir With heart-felt satisfaction I have received...
I have enjoyed peculiar pleasure in looking over Fenno’s Gazettes from last Sepr to June 14th 1797: for I have noticed how respectfully & cordially the several States, in their legislative bodies, cities, towns, societies, & united citizens of different denominations, have acknowledged the benefit of your presidency, during the eight years you was at the head of the American Government: & have...
It is with peculiar pleasure, that I contemplate your having been preserved to the present period; sustained under the weight of that service to which you have been called, by the unanimous vote of your electors; uniformly pursued the prosperity of the United States; concluded upon returning to the enjoyment of domestic happiness; secured the lustre of your character; & communicated to the...
The most cordial congratulations attend your Excellency on your firm & successful conduct during the last Session. The United States are as much indebted to you for the same, as for procuring them a treaty with Great Britain; truly & greatly advantageous, though it may not equal the sanguine wishes of many; still infinitely preferable to a rupture, which would have ruined multitudes, benefited...
This will be presented to You, as I hope, by the nephew of Mrs Gordon, Mr Oliver Field; who from right principles emigrates from Great Britain, that he may become a citizen of the United States, & secure to himself, & family & posterity, those sacred & civil rights, that he cannot enjoy in his native country. He prefers the American Constitution to all others: & from conviction of its being...
Your ardent, persevering, & disinterested patriotism, from the commencement of the American difficulties; & through the various changes that have occurred, from your being chosen Augt 5. 1774 one of the Virginia delegates down to the present day; assure me, that you will approve of my good intentions to promote & perpetuate the welfare of the United States, though you should think me mistaken...
Judging there is an advantage from knowing the particular tempers of those, with whom we have to transcrit business of the first consequence, I have taken up my pen to acquaint your Excellency with the following matters. I had an intimate friend, who was settled, as a minister, with an English Presbyterian church in Rotterdam; & who was acquainted with a teaching tutor of a prince of Wales,...
The goodness of my intention will apologize for the present letter. The purport of which, I conceive, may not be known to any American. You may possibly be under the disagreeable necessity of appointing military officers for active service in dangerous warlike undertakings. I have a great regard for Genl Otho Williams, & am under peculiar obligations to him; but if what our deceased friend...
Your benevolence is so well established, that no apology is needful for my introducing to your notice, my friend the Revd Mr Hickman, who prefers living in a land of real liberty to remaining in his native country, where there is little of it, though great boastings about it. Being at Cambridge the beginning of the week, a gentleman of my acquaintance, Mr Flower, who has published upon the...
The renewed choice of your Excellency to the Presidentship was what I expected; & I was much pleased, when looking over the Gazette of the United States, it appeared that the vote of every elector was in your favor. When the war commenced between G. Britain & France, I was repeatedly asked, What part will the Americans take? I always answered—I apprehend they will observe a strict neutrality;...