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Documents filtered by: Author="Duportail, Antoine-Jean-Louis Le Bègue de Presle" AND Recipient="Washington, George"
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To attack the Enemy in their Lines appears to me a difficult and dangerous Project, it has especially this very considerable Inconvenience, the exposing our Army in case it does not succeed to a total Defeat. This is easily demonstrated—One of the principal means proposed is to throw two thousand men in the rear of the Enemy—if we do not succeed these are so many men absolutely lost—as to the...
By taking Winter Quarters from Lancaster to Reading, we abandon to the Enemy Jersey, and all the Country adjacent to Derby, Chester and Wilmington, one of the richest Tracts in this part of the Continent—By establishing them at Wilmington we cover the Country, and do not so completely abandon that part of it which is before Philadelphia, nor even Jersey, because our proximity to the Enemy and...
I have examined anew with all the attention of which I am capable, the Project of attacking the English and it still appears to me too dangerous—the great Body of Militia with which we might be reinforced for this purpose does not give me any additional hope of succeeding—it is not the number of Troops which is of importance in this case, but it is the quality, or rather their nature and...
If Fortification is necessary in any Armies, it is peculiarly so in those, which like ours, from a deficiency in the practice of manoeuvres cannot oppose any to those of the Enemy—being necessitated therefore to receive him on their own ground, they ought always to be protected either by a natural or artificial Fortification, if it were only to have (under favor of the resistance of this...
It is by no means doubtful that the addition of a few Redouts will increase the strength of our position—but in my opinion they may be regarded as a superfluous exertion of Strength—if in order to make a proper estimation of the advantages of our position, we take notice that the Enemy begins to be subject to our fire at the extreme range of Musket and Case-Shot—that in order to join us; they...
Having been better informed of His Excellencys Intentions, I returned to the Hill, and examined if we could make any inclosed work, which would enable us to maintain the ground with a very small Force but I found no proper Spot. As the Summit of the Hill has both length and breadth, in whatever spot we place the work, it would only see on one or two sides, the ground by which the enemy may...
In all great Enterprises, the first thing to be done, is to form a general Plan of Conduct, to which all the particular operations are to have reference, this general plan is as it were the touch Stone by which all the subordinate projects are proved—according as they agree or disagree with it, they are good or ill, deserve to be approved or rejected: now in this great Enterprise of supporting...
As to the first question— whether we ought to attack General How in his lines —I adhere to what is contained in my last memorial —Unless we have 25 thousand resolute men armed with good muskets and bayonets (for the latter will be necessary here) we ought not to think of it. It is not in my power to discuss the second relative to the Attack on New York, as I am not acquainted with the...
I think we ought not to quit our position of Valley forge—before the enemy has evacuated Philadelphia—he must have lost his reason, to remain in that city without being in a condition to defend it. Thus either the intelligence which says there are no more than 2 or 3000 men there, is false—or the English have it in their power by the measures which they have taken, Signals agreed upon, number...
nous avons d’abord eté a sowr land meeting house. Cet endroit se trouve a 7 milles de princetown, la Chaine de montagnes qui pouvoit nous offrir quelque position avantageuse à 3 milles, de facon que de Cette Chaine a princetown il peut y avoir 10 milles. Celá ma paru trop eloignès pour Remplir l’objet que votre excellence paroit avoir. ou Comme dans la Route nous avions passé a un endroit qui...
The English fleet finding itself by the arrival of six vessels greatly superior to the French fleet, it seems to me that the English may now project a decisive operation. This is to block up the port of Boston with their fleet—to embark all the troops at NewYork—conduct them to Rhode Island—debark them there and march directly towards Boston. To prevent them—this is briefly what I should think...
The works, which are in hand at West Point and some inconsiderable ones, which it is necessary to add to them, will, with the help of the chain, perfectly fulfil the object which is proposed, that of hindering the enemy’s remounting the North River. Fort Putnam, which is, as it were, the key of all the others may be rendered almost impregnable. There is indeed a height, which commands it, but...
je m’étois engagé a suivre de près mr de laumoy a philadelphie, mais j’avoueray a votre excellence que j’ai une Repugnance singuliere a faire le voyage voisy pourquoy. Cette Campagne-cy est peut estre la derniere qui se fera dans le Continent de L’amerique. si elle etoit Donc terminée par quelque action, je serois desespéré de ne m’y estre pas trouvè. je ne Crains pas Certainement que les...
jai lhonneur de vous presenter mes observations sur boston. je les aurois envoyé plus tot s’il ne m’avoit fallu attendre six ou sept jours quèlles fussent traduîtes esperant d’ailleurs les avoir à tout moment. enfin on ne me les à Rendu qu’avant hyer et je suis party le lendemain C’est a dire hyer en prenant Congè du general heath j’ai appris que 10 Regiments anglois s’etoient embarqués a...
Remembrance of the Uneasiness which we felt on the subject of Boston, in the month of October—engages me to represent to Your Excellency that we may have our anxiety revived next Campaign, unless we take seasonable precautions—Your Excellency sent me to that City in order to form a plan of the necessary fortifications—I had the honor of delivering you the Plan —but from what I have learnt, the...
i send to your excellency a Copy of the Resolved of the Council about me. in Council philad. march 31 1779 this board taking into Consideration general du portail’s letter and the instructions Received from general washington dated 30th of june 1778 do Resolve that from the Confidence they Repose in general duportail and their opinion of his skill and jugement he be fully authorised and...
i Receive just now your excellency’s letter and Conformably to your orders i have the honour to propose major mernan for the expedition on susquehanna. i write to him to take your further orders for that Country. i have the honour to be with great Respect your excellency’s the most obedient and very humble servant ALS , DLC:GW . See GW to Duportail, 9 April . GW wrote to Major Murnan on 4 May...
West Point being to us a point which it is of the greatest importance to preserve and to put once for all in a state of defence, I think that we ought not to touch the fund of troops necessary to the defence of this post, in its present state, and to the construction of the works already undertaken. According to what his Excellency has been pleased to submit to our view, it appears that we...
I have the honor to present Your Excellency the state of the troops necessary for the defence of the works at West Point. Fort Clinton and the two water batteries  630 Fort Putnam  300 Rock Hill  100 Redoubt No. 1 with the battery in front  170 Grand battery upon the point to the left of the redoubt   40 Battery at the place marked out   50 Redoubt No. 2 with the battery  170 Redoubt No. 3...
We are honored with two letters from Your Excellency of the 10th and 21st; to the contents of which we beg leave to assure you of our strictest attention—That of the 18th is not yet come to hand—it is not improbable it has gone round by Lewis Town, which has occasioned the delay. Col. Hamilton wrote to Your Excellency from Philadelphia acquainti⟨ng⟩ you with our arrival there and our intention...
Letter not found: from Brigadier General Duportail and Lt. Col. Alexander Hamilton, 1 Nov. 1779 . Duportail and Hamilton wrote GW on 8 Nov.: “We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant.”
We last night received the honor of Your Excellency’s letter of the 25th of October—On the 26th we had the pleasure of advising you fully of our situation and motives for coming to this place. We have since received no further intelligence of the Count—his operations—or ultimate intentions; on which account and from the late period of the season, we have given over all expectation of any thing...
Your Excellencys letter of the 30th of October reached us yesterday. We hope before this you will have received our two letters of the 26th of October and 1st instant. We have received no late advices from the Southward, which confirms us in the ideas of our last—Major Lee will no doubt have communicated to Your Excellency what he mentions to us, that the enemy are preparing at New York for a...
I take the liberty to recommend to your Excellency, Captain Neven who asks to be placed in The Corps of Engineers and who appears to me to have every claim to this favour—Your Excellency will see by the Letter which he has written me and which I annex, that he has long done the Service of [a]n Engineer. Colonel Koskiuske has told me much in his favour, and Colonel Gouvion, with whom he was...
To locate the army to any particular spots, may facilitate the Enemies getting possession of advantageous grounds, either upon one or the other of our flanks. It appears to us more proper therefore, that we move the troops upon the high and advantageous grounds, according as the motions of the enemy may indicate an intention to make an impression at particular places. Having examined the...
I have received the letter, with which Your Excellency was pleased to honor me together with that addressed to the President of Congress. I delivered this at the instant of its receipt, and in the evening I received a resolution of Congress to go to Charles Town. Mr De Castaing has since brought me your letters for General Lincoln. I cannot refuse myself the pleasure of testifying to Your...
You will have probably heard of the Surrender of Charlestown by the time you will receive this Letter. I arrived there the 25th of April at Seven in the morning, after having past during the night in the middle of the Enemies, through the Woods, with the assistance of good Guides—I found the Town in a desperate State, allmost intirely invested by the British Army & Fleet, which had passed the...
i arrived yesterday here and i am informed that an express is setting off immediately for head quarters. so i will have only time enough to write a word. please your excellency to Receive my most sincere thancks for your favour of exchanging me. i am not able to express my gratitude of it and my happiness for Coming again under your orders. Although i am much impatient to see your excellency i...
I do not know where this letter will find you at newwindsor or at newport. I have been told to-day you set off last thursday, but that report appears some what uncertain. I suppose that you have received the letter which I wrote to your excellency some days ago. I begged leave to stay here some time unless you have some reasons to desire my attendance to Rhode island. I have not received your...
I received this afternoon your two letters one of the 21 of february the second of the first of march. I have not time enough to enquire how it happened so, but I am exceedingly sorry of that accident. I will do all my endeavours for Reparing it as much as it is possible. I will set off two morrow morning and I will go as fast as my horses will be able to do. I will go by new windsor and...