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I have certified in the book in the Atheneum that to my certain Knowledge, The Group was written by Mrs: Warren. Your polite invitation to Plymouth, is esteemed as an effusion of friendship, ancient and modern: But three score and nineteen years have reduced me to the Situation, the temper and humour of Mr. Selden, who Clarendon Say’s, would not have Slept out of his own bed, for any office...
I thank you Madam for your obliging Letter of the 10th whether my life shall be Spared to se the restoration of peace, is a question which I cheerfully submit to him whose right it is to decide it. The severe threats of “our old inveterate enemy” have been habitually so familiar to you and me, from the year 1760, ie. for 54 years at least: that they excite less terror in us, than in the puny...
I most sincerely sympathize with you, and the bereved distrest Family at Washington. in the dispensation of heaven which has broken assunder the last paternal ligament; and left you the only Surviveing pillar, of the once numerous Edifice. To us, who in the course of nature expect, and hope to joint the Spirits of the just; are consolations, which to the bereved widow; and Children, are more...
If weak Eyes and weaker fingers had not requird more time to write a Line than was once necessary for a page, I should sooner have aprissed my Sincere Sympathy with you and your whole Family on the loss of your amiable Grand Child. We who have lost all our Ancestors and Collaterals and Several of our Children and Grandchildren well know the pungency of Grief in younger Life under Such tender...
I have been for near two months confined to my chamber, and much of that time unable to write or read or my pen would not have been So long dorment. when I had but partially recoverd, my best Friend was taken Sick with a Similar complaint of the Lungs and fever, which has so affected his Eyes that, as yet he can only write a few lines at a time, and those with pain th my dear Madam join our...
I send you a curiosity. Mr M Kean, is mistaken in a day or two, the final vote of Independence, after the last debate, was passed on the 2nd or third of July, and the declaration prepared, and signed on the 4th: What are we to think of history? when in less than 40 years, such diversities appear in the memories of living persons, who were witnesses. After noting what you please, I pray you to...
I have been much to blame for neglecting to acknowledge your obliging favour of Sept 12th. I am very much obliged for your civilities to my wife; my Son, Colonel Smith and my Grandaughters. My Girls have long expressed an earnest desire to see Madam Warren, and have been highly gratified by their visit and very grateful for the kind hospitality; the social enjoyments, and instructive...
I was so highly gratified with the visit from your Grandaughter that I could not leave her to write, knowing that She had determined to remain with me only two days She brought me your kind and Friendly Letter, which was doubly precious to me; as it gave me the assurance, that you had recoverd from an illness, which made me dread for several posts, to hear from plimouth. With a mind unimpared,...
your kind and sympathetic Letter demands my thanks and receives my gratitude—my own loss is not to be estimated by words and can only be alleiviated by the consoling beleif that my dear Child is partakeing of that Life and immortality brought to Light by him who endured the cross and is gone before to prepare a place for those who Love him, & keep his commandments. her patience Submission and...
Your kind and Sympathetic Letter demands my thanks, and receives my gratitude. My own loss is not to be estimated by words—and can only be alleviated by the consoling beleif that my Dear Daughter is partakeing of that Life and immortality brought to light by him, who endured the cross; and is gone before to prepare a place; for those who Love him and keep his commandments. Her patience...
Permit one to enclose to you a Packet from my old Friend Governor M Kean: and a dialogue of the dead. The latter was the effusion of a musing moment of an evening at Richmond Hill when Congress sat at N York in 1789 immediately after the arrival of the news of Dr Franklins death. Searching last Sunday among a heap of forgotten rubbish for another paper, It struck my eye. After you shall have...
I cannot let my Son visit Plimouth without bearing a few lines to my old Friend who has always taken a kind interest in the welfare of my dear Daughter Smith, who reached here a fortnight Since with her Sister Son and daughter, but So helpless in her Limbs as not to be able to walk across the Room, obliged to be carried in a chair from the Chamber to the Carriage—If this was all the melancholy...
I received your obliging favour, with the Letters inclosed safely and was gratified that the Sentiments which they containd met your cordial approbation & the excited congenial feelings in the Bosoms of your Sons, if I may judge from the marks which distinguish them. I have indeed great cause for pleasure and Satisfaction in the ability integrity and fidelity with which my Son has devoted...
I received your obliging favour, with the Letters inclosed, and was gratified that the Sentiments which they contain’d met your cordial approbation, and exited congenial feelings in the Bosoms of your Sons—if I may judge from the marks which distinguish them— I have indeed great cause for pleasure and Satisfaction, in the ability, integrity, and fidelity with which my Son has devoted himself...
your Letter this morning received So kindly inquiring after my Dear Daughter, demands from me, not only my thanks, but an immediate reply. Mrs Smith, through her whole Life has enjoyd good health, untill the painfull opperation She endured the last Summer, after which her nerves were much affected. Soon after her return to the valley She wrote me word, that She had been Severely attacked with...
I cannot let my Son pass through Plimouth without stoping to inquire after your Health, and that of Your Family! Nor of asking You who have lived many years, and where observations and experience, must have excited in your mind, Reflections which ought not to terminate with your days— what is your opinion of the great and important events which are taking place in the civilized world? will...
I will not Suffer the year to close upon me without noticeing your repeated favours and thanking you for them—so long as we inhabit this Earth and possess any of our faculties we must do feel for our fee posterity for our Friends and our Country—personally We have arived so near the close of the drama that we shall feel but few of those evils which await others, (we have past through one...
After I returnd from your hospitable Mansion where the scenes of former days were pleasin g ly renewd I had the Subjects of contraversy between two ancient Friends and upon a review—I must Candedly Say that I judged both in the wrong, and am certain if personal intercourse from unavoidable circumstances had not been obstructed, neither party would so have judged, or so have written— I was can...
I thank you for your kind inquiries after my Daughter Smith. She is, and has been as well, the Physicians Say, as any one could expect, after Such an Operation, as She has endured—to me it was agonizing—She Sustaind it with firmness, and fortitude The wound has been intirely healed for this month, but the mussels from the Arm, which communicate with the part affected, were necessarily laid So...
Standing as we do upon the confines of the other world, you at the age of four-score, and I at three score and near a half, no other sentiment ought to posses our Bosoms but those of benevolence and good will towards each other. A Friendship upon my part was instilled into my mind by one who knew you earlier in life and who estimated your virtues, and talents as they justly deserved— And from...
“Pride of Talents and much Ambition were undoubtedly combined in the Character of the President, who immediately Succeeded General Washington” and these are represented as the most prominent features of his Character. Vol. 3. p. 393. Permit me Madam to ask the favour of you, to point out the Act or Word, which appeared to you to evince this Pride of Talents. I know not that I ever felt any...
In the 306 page of your first Volume there are certain Traits that I had overlooked. “Richard Henry Lee Esq. was the first who dared explicitly to propose a Declaration of Independence. The Proposal Spread a Sudden dismay. A Silent Astonishment, Seemed to prevade the Assembly” &c. These Expressions, Madam, could only have arisen from Misinformation, or perhaps I shall express myself more...
In order to give you all the Authentic Documents necessary to explain the Remarks I have made upon your History, I have omitted to give you Copies of one or two Commissions which I intended to have transcribed in their Places. One of them is in these Words. The United States of America in Congress assembled To all to whom these Presents Shall come Send Greeting. Whereas these United States,...
More demonstrations of your Friendship for Mr Adams appear in the 229 page of the third Volume. The Same disposition to wink him out of Sight, to represent him in an odious light, to lessen and degrade him below his Station, which runs through every part of your history in which he appears, is very visible here again. “Mr John Adams had left Holland and joined the Plenipotentiaries of the...
In your third Volume page 169, you say that “on the twenty Second of April 1782, Mr. Adams was admitted at the Hague and with the Usual Ceremonies received as Minister Plenipotentiary from the United States of America. ” This mistake of a few days in Chronology is Scarcely worth a Remark, but I suppose you would wish to be correct. It was on the Nineteenth day of April, not the twenty Second....
Had I really been disgusted and mortified at my Treatment by Congress which in fact I was not, but was Satisfied as Soon as it was explained to me, the mortification would have been more than compensated by the Commissions I received on the fourth of November, 1779 unquestionably the more confidential Commissions that Congress had ever issued. The Commission to General Washington as Commander...
In the 135th. Page of your Second Volume, you State that in 1778 Mr John Adams of the State of Massachusetts was chosen to Succeed Mr Deane as Commissioner in behalf of the United States at the Court of France: an inaccuracy however of so little importance that it was Scarcely worth a Correction. In the 139th. page you say that within a few Months after Congress made a new Arrangement of...
In the 131 and 132 page of the first Volume of your History, you are pleased to say that John Adams, one of the Negatived Counsellors a Barrister at Law of rising Abilities, his Appearance on the Theatre of Politicks commenced at this Period, that is in 1774. This is of very little Importance, and would not be worthy of much Attention if it did not dis betray a Malignity of heart and a...
In the 392 Page of the third Volume of your History you say that “After Mr Adams’s return from England, he was implicated, by a large portion of his Countrymen, as having relinquished the Republican System, And forgotten the Principles of the American Revolution, which he had advocated for near twenty years.” I am somewhat at a loss for the meaning of the Word implicated in this place. If it...
As it is neither consistent with my Principles, Disposition or habits, upon any misunderstanding with an ancient Friend, to conceive Resentment and hostility to be changed into an Enemy, I shall still continue my old Style of address to Mrs. Warren. I have read much if not all your history of the Rise Progress and termination of the American Revolution. I am not about to write a review of it....