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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Virginia Assembly" AND Period="Revolutionary War"
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To the Honourable House of Burgesses and Senators of the common wealth of Virginia the Petition of sundry Inhabitants and Freholders Situate in the south part of Albemarle county Humbly Sheweth, that your petitioners suffer many and great Hardships and inconveniencys from the Vast extent of said County in Traveling to the Court-house, the greatest part by far of your petitioners have from...
To the Honl. The Speaker and Delegates of the Common Wealth of Virginia. The Petition of Thomas Johnson Jun. humbly shewith that your petitioner was appointed a Captain in the County of Louisa and raised his quota of men and when he was about to march to Join his Ridgment, was obliged to hire a Cart and two Stears of Charles Yancey to carry his mens baggage &c. as far as Carrs bridge and after...
Reasons to be offered at the conference to be desired of the Senate in answer to their reasons delivered at the last conference. The house of delegates not being satisfied with the reasons urged by the Senate in support of their amendments to the resolution for allowing to Thomas Johnson the sum of £15-5-6 have desired this second conference to shew the insufficiency of the said reasons and to...
The Senate conceive that, in the present Question, it is of no consequence whether the constituent Parts of our Legislature resemble the Lords and Commons of Great Britain , or whether the Senate is made to resemble the House of Lords in this or that Particular. Clearly pointed out as they have supposed the Office of the two Houses to be in the matter on which a Difference of Opinion has...
The honour which the General Assembly have been pleased to confer on me, by calling me to the high office of Governour of this commonwealth, demands my most grateful acknowledgments, which I desire through you Gentlemen, to tender to them with the utmost respect. In a virtuous and free state, no rewards can be so pleasing to sensible minds, as those which include the approbation of our fellow...
Mr. Pelham having very obligingly procured me the means of addressing you, I take this first opportunity of representing to you the Circumstances and situation of the two Gentlemen at present in confinement along with me. I am to suppose they have been put in Prison for having acted under my orders. If there be any criminality in those orders Justice demands that I alone should be the...
Williamsburg, 2 Nov. 1779 . The petitioner embarked on an armed brig in February 1777 as a part of the state regiment and was taken to England as a prisoner; having contracted a debt of 160 guineas while a prisoner and during escape, he requests that his pay as captain be made equal to hard money; he requests also a commission as major of marines. RC ( Vi ); 2 p. Dick’s petition was...
I receive with great satisfaction this testimony of the public approbation, and beg leave through you gentlemen, to return my sincere thanks to the General Assembly. I shall cheerfully again encounter the anxieties and assiduities inseparable from the important office to which you are pleased a second time to call me, and only wish to be able to call forth those effectual exertions of my...
I AM sorry, after so long and laborious a session of Assembly, the publick exigencies should be such as to call for an earlier meeting of the members than was intended. A proclamation has been this day issued for convening you on the first day of March; and though that alone was necessary in point of formality, I could not deny myself the apprizing you by letter of those circumstances which...
It is with great reluctance that after so long and laborious a Session as the last I have been again obliged to give you the trouble of convening in General Assembly within so short a time and in so inclement a season. But such was the situation of Public Affairs as to render it indispensable. The six millions of pounds ordered to be emitted at the last Session of assembly, the four millions...
It is thought that the present Situation of the Enemy in this State affords an opportunity of undertaking Some military operations of Importance. To enable the Commanding Officer to carry them on, an additional Force on the Water is necessary. There are in James and Appamattox Rivers vessels of private Property suited and sufficient for the Purpose as is believed. I shall be glad to have the...
Baron Steuben has sent to this Place a number of the Levies raised under the act of assembly passed at the Session of May 1780, whom he declines retaining as unfit for Service. It was his Desire that it should be made known to the assembly. I therefore take the Liberty of inclosing to you his Letter. The Discharge of these men will on the one Hand lose the Bounty the public: on the other the...
I beg leave to lay before the General assembly the inclosed letter from the honble. Majr. Genl. Baron Steuben containing some propositions for the internal defence of our state. I have the honour to be with very great respect Sir your most obedt & most humble servt, RC ( Vi ); addressed; docketed: “Governors Letter enclosing Baron Steubens plan for the internal defence of the State. March 6th:...
Richmond, 8 Mch. 1781 . This letter is identical with the first part of the letter sent to George Washington, same date, q.v. FC ( Vi ); 2 p. TJ’s letter was presented to the House the same day and was “ordered to lie on the table” ( JHD Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia (cited by session and date of publication) , Mch. 1781, Va. State Libr., Bull. , 1928, p. 16).
I think it my duty to communicate to the General assembly the inclosed papers giving information of the refusal of considerable numbers of militia within certain counties to come into the feild, and the departure of some others in defiance with their arms. The crisis at which these instances of disobedience to the laws have appeared, may bring on peculiar ill consequences. I have taken the...
The Executive were informed during the last summer or Fall that the Accomack and Diligence gallies were deserted by officers and men, and left open to be plundered of their guns and furniture. Orders were immediately given to Commodore Baron to arrest the officers, to have the men sought for and taken, one of the gallies brought round to the Bayside of the Eastern shore and manned with the...
At the request of Major General Baron Steuben expressed in the inclosed letter, I take the liberty of laying it before you. The number of Militia necessary to be called into the field, and time of their being there, we begged the Baron to advise. He did so. Apprehending deficiencies, we ordered a considerably larger number. As soon as we received the Letters informing us of the deficiencies...
The Marquis Fayette desired me among the articles most essential for an enterprize at the Head of which he is, to procure 130 Draught Horses for Artillery and 50 Saddle Horses for Officers to act on. I gave Power and Instructions to have them procured by Purchase if possible and if not by Impress. One of the Quartermasters employed in this Business informs me that he has purchased some and...
The inclosed act of Congress will inform you of the final ratification of the Confederation of the thirteen United states of America. I beg leave to congratulate the General assembly on this very important event, by which a firm bond of Union is drawn on these states, our friends enabled to repose confidence in our engagements, and our enemies deprived of their only remaining hope. I have the...
I take the liberty of inclosing to the General Assembly the within Proposition from Mr. Ross the Commercial Agent for the State as the Legislature alone can carry it into Effect, should it meet with approbation. I have the Honor to be with very great respect Sir Your, &c., FC ( Vi ); at head of text: “To the Speaker of the House of Delegates.” Enclosure: David Ross to TJ , same date, q.v. TJ’s...
Not doubting but the General Assembly will be glad to be informed of the Occurrences in the Carolina’s, I take the liberty of transmitting to them a Letter I have received from General Greene and some extracts from Letters received from Major McGill who is with the Southern Army. I have the Honor to be, &c., P.S. I must take the liberty of begging a return of Genl. Greene’s Letter when...
I do myself the honor of inclosing you a letter I received yesterday evening informing me of the arrival of a British fleet of force in Chesapeake bay. Should this be confirmed beyond all doubt I shall think it proper to discharge the armed vessels of private property which had been impressed into public service. In the mean time they are coming up to a safer part of the river, and a valuation...
We deferred changing the place of calling the Assembly, in hopes that every Day would give us a prospect of getting rid of the enemy in the neighbourhood of Richmond. The Arrival of the Marquis Fayette with a detachment of Continental Troops, and the junction of our whole force together with his, has put these cowardly plunderers under way down the River, and renders this Place perfectly...
I have the Honour to communicate to the General Assembly an Ordinance of Congress of the 5th. Day of April last for establishing Courts for the Trial of Piracies and Felonies committed on the high Seas; also certain Resolutions of Congress of the 16th. and 23d. of March on the mode of paying Debts and [furnishing] Supplies of Money and of the 20th. of April relative to that Part of Colo....
Since I had the honour of addressing the General Assembly by Letter of the 14th instant I have received a second Letter from the Honble. Major General Greene on the subject of cavalry and another in answer to one I had written communicating to him information I had recived as to the conduct of a particular officer employed by him in impressing, which I transmit herewith. I also inclose a...
[ Charlottesville, 31? May 1781 . JHD Journal of the House of Delegates of the Commonwealth of Virginia (cited by session and date of publication) , May 1781, 1828 edn., p. 7 (31 May): “The Speaker laid before the House a letter from the Governor, enclosing one from Baron Steuben, with a representation of the present state of the Virginia line; which was read and ordered to be referred to the...
The Memorial of a Number of faithful Citizens humbly represents, That your Memorialists have from Sentiment, as well as a regard to the Authority of our Country, cordially espoused the common Cause of America. We have invariably endeavoured to cultivate unanimity, Fortitude and Perseverance amongst our fellow Subjects, and joined our most fervent prayers with our Endeavours that the Measures...
I beg leave to refer to the consideration of the General assembly the inclosed letters from the County Lieutenants of Augusta, Rockbridge and Rockingham, and have the honour to be with great respect Sir your most obedt. humble servt., RC ( Vi ); addressed by TJ: “The honble Benjamin Harrison esq. Speaker of the House of Delegates.” Enclosures (missing): These were probably George Moffett to...
Quelques jours passé J’ai eu L’honneur de vous informer de L’Etat de La Ligne de Virginie en General. J’espere que Vous avez fait connaitre a L’honorable Assemble le contenue de cette Lettre. Croyant necessaire que Les Legislative soient au fait du nombre des trouppes que cet Etat tiens en Campagne. A present je prens la Liberté de vous depeindre La situation des trouppes presentement...
To the honourable the Speaker and the House of Delegates the petition of Mace Freeland of the county of Buckingham humbly sheweth That James Freeland, your petitioner’s father being seised and possessed of a considerable estate in lands slaves and personalties, and having issue James Freeland your petitioner’s elder brother by one venter, and your petitioner by another, devised to the said...