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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Recipient="Vergennes, Charles Gravier, comte de"
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We have the honour to enclose an extract of a letter from the Commissioners of the United States of America to Your Excellency dated Aug st. 28 th. 1778. Copy of Your Excellency’s ans r dated 27. Sept r. 1778. & Copy of M. de Sartine’s letter to Your Excellency of the 21 st of Sept r. 1778 all relative to a proposed negotiation with the States of Barbary. Not having any particular authority or...
My hand recovering very slowly from the effects of it’s dislocation, I am advised by the Surgeons to try the waters of Aix in Provence. From thence I think it possible I may go as far as Nice. As circumstances might arise under which a passport might be useful, I take the liberty of troubling your Excellency for one. I propose to set out on Thursday next. I would at the same time ask an...
After begging leave to present my respects to your Excellency on my return to this place, I take the liberty of offering to your attention some papers which I found on my arrival here, written by sundry merchants of l’Orient, and others, some of whom are citizens of the United states, and all of them concerned in the trade between the two countries. This has been carried on by an exchange of...
In the enclosed letter Mr. Adams and myself have the honor to inform your Excellency of the measures ultimately taken for procuring arrangements between the United States of America and the States of Barbary, and to ask his Majesty’s interposition. To the information therein contained it is necessary for me to add that Mr. Barclay who is charged with the commission to Morocco will set out in...
I have the honor now to inclose to your Excellency a copy of the letter from Congress to the king which I delivered yesterday. This copy was sent to me by Mr. Jay the Secretary of Congress for Foreign affairs. I also accompany it with a copy of the letter of Credence which I had the honour of delivering to the King, not having furnished you with a copy on that occasion. I am with sentiments of...
I have the honour of inclosing to your Excellency a report of the voiage of an American ship, the first which has gone to China. The circumstance which induces Congress to direct this communication is the very friendly conduct of the Consul of his Majesty at Macao, and of the Commanders and other officers of the French vessels in those seas. It has been with singular satisfaction that Congress...
I have duly received the honor of your Excellency’s letter of the 18th. instant, and will avail myself of the first occasion of transmitting it to Congress. The pleasure of meeting your desire, will, I am persuaded, induce them to do for Mr. Dumas whatever the establishment which they think themselves bound to keep up at the Hague, together with the rules to which they have submitted all their...
I have the honor of communicating to your Excellency the copy of a treaty of amity and commerce concluded between the United States of America and his late Majesty the King of Prussia, in the two languages in which it was written, each of which was agreed to be equally original. The exchange of ratifications was made but a little before the death of the King. This circumstance with the delays...
Circumstances of public duty calling me suddenly to London, I take the liberty of mentioning it to your Excellency, and of asking a few minutes audience of you, at as early a day and hour as will be convenient to you, and that you will be so good as to indicate it to me. I could wish to leave Paris about Friday or Saturday, and suppose that my stay in London will be of about three weeks. I...
I have had the honour of receiving your Excellency’s letter of November the 30th. in which you are pleased to inform me of the late abatement of the duties on all fish oils, made from fish taken by citizens of the United States and brought into this kingdom, in French or in American bottoms: and I am now to return thanks for this relief given to so important a branch of our commerce. I shall...