You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Adams, John
  • Recipient

    • Tufts, Cotton

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Adams, John" AND Recipient="Tufts, Cotton"
Results 1-37 of 37 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
I have nothing to do at present but to play with my Pen. I have long thought with Horace in his Dulce desipere: But now they tell me it is Utile dulci. I dare not think, for fear of injuring my Health, and for my soul I cannot set still without Thinking; so I am necessitated to keep my Pen in Motion to avoid it, and I believe you are well satisfyd it has answerd the End. I rejoice to hear you...
We are impatiently waiting for Intelligence of further Particulars from Boston. We have only heard that General How and his Army have left it, and that General Washington with a Part of his, has taken Possession of it. How shall I express my Joy to you at this great Event! As we are in Possession of Dorchester Heights, Charlestown Heights and Noddles Island, I think there can be no Danger of...
It is with Shame, and Confusion of Face, that I acknowledge that your agreable Favour of April the twenty sixth, came duely to my Hand and has laid by me unanswered to this Time. There has been as much Folly and Inattention to my own Pleasure, and Interest, in this Negligence as there is of Ingratitude to you, for in the sincerity of my Heart I declare, that none of the Letters of my numerous...
Your Favour of the 17th. I received by Yesterdays Post. Am much obliged, to you for your judicious Observations of the Spirit of Com­ merce and Privateering, and many other Subjects, which I have not Time to consider, at present. I mean to express my Sentiments of them in this Letter. You tell me a Plan is forming for immediately erecting a Foundery. I wish you would oblige me so much as to...
Yours of July 5th. never reached me, till this Morning. I greatly regret its delay. But that it might answer its End, without further Loss of Time, I waited on my Friend Dr. Rush, an eminent Phisician of this City, and a worthy Friend of mine, who with a Politeness and Benevolence, becoming his Character, promised to furnish me with his Sentiments, concerning Inocculation, so that I may...
I have the Pleasure of yours of the 5th. of August, for which I am much obliged to you. It is a great Satisfaction to me to be informed, of the Particulars which are enumerated in your Letter, upon which the Happiness of the People and their Exertions in the Cause so much depend. I am not able to inform you of any News, except what the News Papers contain. Those inclosed, contain some Things...
Your Favour of July 25th was received in Paris in my Absence, and I have never had opportunity, to acknowledge it, till now. You are now I hope happy, both in the Constitution and Administration of Government. It cannot be long before We shall see the Lists. I am obliged to you for the Journal of the Weather, but cannot admit your Excuse for not writing me Politicks. Every one says you will...
I have only time to inclose a few Papers and to pray for your Health and Prosperity. I am much distressed for my Brother Cranch as the last Accounts were allarming. So pleasing a Friendship of near 30 Years standing is a Blessing not to be replaced. I cannot give up the Hopes that I may yet see him in good Health. My worthy Father Smith must be greatly afflicted at this Sickness. The sorrows...
I thank you for your Favours of June 26 and July 5 and for your obliging Congratulations, on the Peace. The Articles respecting Refugees had better have been omitted , but we could not have Peace without them and the Peace as it is, is better than none. The se Articles must be explained by a Consideration of the words of them and the whole Treaty, and I do not consider myself at Liberty to Say...
I am here, happily Settled with my Family and I feel more at home, than I have ever done in Europe. I have not time to enlarge, as Mr. Tracy who takes this, is upon his Return to London. The Pasture you mention, rocky and bushy as it is, I should be glad to purchase, and if you can, I wish you to buy it for me and draw upon me for the Money, and if you know of any Salt Marsh or Woodland to be...
Know all Men by these Presents, that I John Adams of Braintree in the County of Suffolk in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts have constituted and do hereby constitute the Honourable Cotton Tufts of Weymouth in said County Esq. my lawfull Attorney, giving him full Authority for the Management of all my Estate and Effects Real Personal and mixed in the said Commonwealth, for me and in my Name...
What would be the Consequence if We should have an immediate War with Great Britain? dont be allarmed there is no danger of it. but it is usefull to Speculate. Would not our Produce be all fetched away to Europe in Dutch French, Portuguese, Italian Sweedish Vessells &c— and would not our Privateers made great Havack among British Commerce? They might pour into Nova Scotia and Canada Troops,...
Last night I received yours of 1 Jan. and immediately accepted the Bill for 50 £. St. payable in London. Whenever you draw upon me, you may draw payable in London, Amsterdam or Paris, as you shall find most beneficial. I accepted the Bill with Pleasure, as the purchases you have made are much to my Taste. I consent too, very readily to your raising my low House. It has need of it. If Verchilds...
It was yesterday only that I received your Favour of Nov. 26, which contains many Things which you mentioned in a posteriour Letter which I have answered. I am glad you purchased the Pasture and Marsh. I accepted your Bill at sight and it was paid to Mr. Elworthy at sight fifty Pounds. I wish you to repair the House in Boston, and to go on purchasing Bits of Marsh and Wood, if you can find...
Dr. 1784. June. 24. To Cash pd. Nath. Austin 19/6 July. 1. To Nath. Willis 30/9 2. 10. 3 July. 21. To 1/2 m. Nails 4/ Aug. 11. To Cash pd. Jno. Gill 24/ 1/2 qe Paper 9d 1. 8. 9
It gives me great Pleasure to see that good Men are so much in Fashion in the Massachusetts. M r Bowdoin in the Chair, and D r Tufts with such a Superabundant Majority of Votes in the Senate and M r Cranch too; it looks as if Sterling would get the better of Tinsel. it is high time. Our Merchants I believe are wholly occupied with their Entertainments, their Variety of Wheel Carriages their...
Your kind Favours of Nov 12. and 24. and Decr 21 are before me. I Sympathize with you, under the Loss of your amiable Mrs Tufts, who was Innocence and Charity itself and Innocence and Charity can never put off the Flesh but for an happier state. It gives me great Satisfaction to be informed that my Sons Behaviour is approved, by you. As they must labour for their Lives, I hope they will...
Inclosed with this is a Letter to Dr Holyoke and all the original Papers from the Royal Society of Medicine. You will be so good as to inclose and direct them to him. I hope Mr. John is, or will soon be at Colledge. You may draw upon me for two hundred Pounds st. and invest it as before, to help you pay the Expences of my Boys. Yours Inclosed is a Note from my Friend Count Sarsefield. Will you...
There is a Subject So closely connected, with the Business of my Mission to this Court, that I can no longer be Silent upon it, with Honour. The most insuperable Bar, to all their Negotiations here, has been laid by those States which have made Laws against the Treaty. The Massachusetts is one of them. The Law for Suspending Execution for British Debts, however coloured or disguised, I make no...
I am proud to learn by your Letter of 13. April that I am so rich at the University. If Thomas gets in, I shall be still happier. The Expence will be considerable, and your Draughts shall be honoured for the necessary. A Year will soon be about, and what are We to do then with John? What Lawyer shall We desire to take him, in Town or Country? and what Sum must be given with him? and what will...
I have accepted your Bill in favour of Storer, of 50£. and paid that in favour of Mr Elworthy of 40£. I wish you to buy that Bit of an House and Land, which you mention, but am afraid they will make you give more for it than it is worth, it lies so to me that I must have it. The Pieces of Marsh adjoining to mine, I wish you to buy likewise. Draw upon me for the Money to pay for them. Let...
Having determined to return to Pens hill, I begin to think in what a pitiful Condition I shall find my Meadow and Hill &c &c. Poor as a heath I Suppose, as I found them, but am determined they shall not remain long in such a contemptible plight. This is therefore to beg the favour of you to purchase for me Josh. Bracketts Heap at his stable for a year, and desire my Brother or my Tenant to...
You mention to M rs Adams a Piece of Land adjoining to me, of 56 Acres at 25 s an Acre: but are at a Loss, whether it will be for my Interest to purchase it, as you are not informed of my Views, &c.— My View is to lay fast hold of the Town of Braintree and embrace it, with both my Arms and all my might. there to live—there to die—there to lay my Bones—and there to plant one of my Sons, in the...
I am very happy to learn, by your Letter of the 30. June that my Son is with Mr Parsons at Newbury Port. There is so much Appearance of War, that; I thought it a Precaution of Prudence to Send my Manuscript Letter Books, and Collections of Papers, relative to all my Transactions in France and Holland, home by Mr Jenks. They are contained in a large Truck, and are so numerous as to fill it, so...
So many Things appear to be done, when one is making Preparations for a Voyage, especially with a Family, that you must put up with a short Letter in answer to yours. We shall embark in March on board of the ship Lucretia Capt n Calahan, and arrive in Boston as soon as We can: till which time I must suspend all Requests respecting, my little affairs. Your Bills shall be honoured as they...
Every Question you ask about the new Constitution shows that you understand the subject as well as I can pretend to do, and that you are Well aware of the reasonable Difficulties and Objections. But is there not danger that a new Convantion at this time, would increase the Difficulties and reasonable Exceptions rather than remove any of that? (A Declaration of Rights I wish to see With all my...
Every Thing has happened, as I could wish Since I left you, excepting the delay of making Provision for my Subsistance; and this has proceeded from an Uncertainty what they ought to do. I am very easy on that Point, as I am determined to live in Proportion to my allowance, I beg leave to mention one Thing, which may be of Some consequence, both to the Public and to me.—If Thomas would...
The last Evenings Post favoured me with your’s of the 6th. Many Gentlemen are in favour of a national Excise: and some would have the nation take upon itself all the State Debts, Mr Morris particularly: but I cannot say what will be done. My Burthens are not very heavy: but my health is not very good.—I have been obliged to decide many questions on the Import Bill, the Senate being equally...
Inclosed is a letter from a Mr. Robert Henry to me let me beg the favour of you to look among my Papers and in any Book and see if any such notes are to be found And to write me if you can learn any Thing of such Persons as John and Dably Ryan— With great regard—Yours MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I have received your favour of the 22.—Mrs Adams, Mr Charles and Miss Lousia, arrived on Wednesday the 24th after a tedious Passage of five days from Newport. We are all very happy. Mr Samuel Tufts needs no other merit but that of being your Brother, to convince me that he has a great deal: but if he is a Candidate for any Employment he must apply directly to the first Magistrate. The...
I have recd all your Letters, and the Post Office is very faithful. The Heat has been excessive and my daily Toil Somewhat exhausting besides a very extensive Correspondence, without a Clerk. Pray let Mr Cranch if he will be so good look over the account, as he did formerly. Have you read Ned Church’s fragment.? What Passion, or what Principle, could put it into that fellows head? I never...
Inclosed is a letter from Mr Robert Henry. Let me beg of you to see if the notes are to be found, and to send them to me. One of the Ryans is now in Vermont as Mr Henry tells me. Should be obliged to you if you would let me know, what minutes you find about the affair in my books. I have not heard a word from my farm or garden, since Mrs A. left it. did the grass grow or not. I communicated...
I have received your favour of the 3 d and am much obliged to you for it and equally pleased with its Contents. I agree with you in opinion that it will be well to rebuild the Wall against Hardwick: to renew the Leases as soon as possible with French and Burrill, if they choose to do so, and to plough and cart manure as you propose. I am very glad the Meadow is ploughed. This is a great Point...
I congratulate you on the new Year and the new Century. Aspice venturo lætentur Ut Omnia Sæclo. You may take Pennimans Island and Acre of March at 27£ or perhaps at 30£ though fifteen is more than it is worth. The Island is mere Show. it lies however within me, and some one will Speculate upon me if I buy it not. Candlewood Hill is an unknown Country to me. I never heard the Name. But I...
I have yours of the 2d. ——before this, you have Seen the Treaty with France. The full assurance of your Newspapers, has been wholly disappointed. Mr Jefferson and Mr Burr have equal Numbers 73.—Which will be Chief? I Shall be in Quincy as early in the Spring as the Roads and Weather will permit. The only Question remaining with me is what I shall do with myself? Something I must do or Ennui...
KNOW ALL MEN by these Presents, That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk and Commonwealth of Massachusetts Esquire do make, constitute and appoint Cotton Tufts of Weymouth in the County aforesaid Esquire my true and lawful Attorney, for me and in my Name to sell, assign and transfer the whole or any Part of the Six Pr. Cent Stock of T whatever Description standing in my Name in the...
Know all men by these Presents, That I John Adams of Quincy in the County of Norfolk & Commonwealth of Massachusetts Esquire do make, constitute and appoint Cotton Tufts of Weymouth in the said County Esquire my true and lawful Attorney, for me and in my Name to sell, assign and tran s fer all or any part of the Stock now standing or that may hereafter stand in my Name on the Books of the...