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Previous to yours of the 26th inst: I had received directions from the Board of War to send part, or if they could be spared, the whole of Colo. Hazens Regt to Albany. Their numbers are so reduced that it is not worth while to make a division, and I therefore desire that you will immediately march with all that are fit for duty. As your nearest Rout will be thro’ Bethlehem you will cross the...
I have rec’d your letter of the 20th & am much obliged to you for the intelligence it contains. You cannot promote the service more than by continuing your exertions to get information of whatever passes with the enemy, particularly at New York & in the river. It is of great importance that we should get immediate notice of any embarkation—the sailing of any troops out of the harbour or the...
I have duly received Your two favors of the 30th of July and 2d Instant with the papers—and thank you for the same and the intelligence transmitted. As I am persuaded your best endeavours will be directed to obtain all the information you can respecting the Enemy—I shall not trouble you with any particular request upon the present occasion—except with one, which is, that if at any time the...
I have been duly favored with your letter of the 6th inst. The plan you have laid for obtaining intelligence appears to be very well calculated for the end at present. I wish you to turn your inquiries as far as possible or practicable to the ascertaining the extent of the preparations which the enemy may be making to procure waggons—Whether the Inhabitants of Long Island—York Island—and...
Your favor of the 7th came to my hands about an hour ago by Mr Garrison with whom I have had a good deal of conversation and think his scheme, if it can be brought to bear, is a very good one—He will relate to you the substance of our discourse, which will save me a recital of it. I have only to request the favor of you to give it yr aid and that you will be so good as to fix a compensation...
The period is now come (in the arrival of the enemy’s reinforcement ) when intelligence is interesting and important. The first point to be ascertained, as nearly as possible, is the amount of the reinforcement, and whether it consists of complete Corps or of Recruits. If of the former, what the particular Regiments are? The next matter, which I would wish you to endeavour to become acquainted...
I have this morning recd yours of the 5th with the News papers and the counterfeit Bill inclosed. I thank you for the very material intelligence which your letter contains, and shall be further obliged by your communicating the true destination of the intended embarkation, if you can come to a knowledge of it. Whenever the person you mention chuses to return he may be assured of my protection,...
I have recd your favr of the 17th and am exceedingly obliged to you for the intelligence it contains. I send inclosed two half Johannes. Should you expend any more for the same purposes I will immediately remit it to you. Be pleased to endeavour to learn whether the Vessels, preparing to take the Cavalry on board, are square rigged, or sloops and schooners; we may judge of the Voyage by being...
It is yet a matter of uncertainty whether His Excellency the Count D’Estaing will come to the Northward with intent to operate, or return to the West Indies. Should he determine upon the former and New York should be the object, the possession of Staten Island will be absolutely necessary: to accomplish which, we should be previously well informed of the Strength of the Enemy upon it—what...
[ Great Egg Harbor Landing, New Jersey, October 29, 1799. The description of this letter in the dealer’s catalogue reads: “… is sending clothing to Taylor by pilot boat. ‘I am getting sick & cant say any more.’” Letter not found. ] ALS , sold by G. A. Baker & Company, Inc., May 4, 1943, Item 25. When this letter was written, H and Brigadier General Louis Le Bèque Du Portail were at Great Egg...
Letter not found. Ca. 27 August 1793. Mentioned in JM to Jefferson, 27 Aug. 1793 , and JM to Taylor, 20 Sept. 1793 . Acknowledged in Taylor to JM, 25 Sept. 1793 . Written from Monroe’s home near Charlottesville, the letter urges Taylor to organize a public meeting in Caroline County, suggests resolutions supporting the French alliance, and proposes that Edmund Pendleton patronize the measure....
I informed you from Albemarle of the step taken with regard to the paper from you. Our distant friend under whose perusal it passed is quite in raptures with it, and augurs the best consequences from it, if its appearance be well timed. He thinks the present in every respect unpropitious, and that under any circumstances the critical moment would be about two or three weeks before the first...
In my new occupation of a farmer I find a good drilling machine indispensably necessary. I remember your recommendation of one invented by one of your neighbors; and your recommendation suffices to satisfy me with it. I must therefore beg of you to desire one to be made for me, and if you will give me some idea of it’s bulk, and whether it could travel here on it’s own legs, I will decide...
I have long owed you a letter, for which my conscience would not have let me rest in quiet but on the consideration that the paiment would not be worth your acceptance. The debt is not merely for a letter the common traffic of a day, but for valuable ideas, which instructed me, which I have adopted, and am acting on them. I am sensible of the truth of your observations that the atmosphere is...
This is not the long letter I intend to write in answer to yours of the 5th. Ult. That must await a rainy day, perhaps a rainy season. But as the sowing the succory will not await, I write a line for the present, merely to cover a little seed which I have procured from a neighbor for you. It must be sown immediately, in drills which will admit the plough, and very thin in the drill as the...
We have tried the drill with Lucerne seed, and found it shed a great deal too much, so that we were obliged to lay it aside. I presume therefore I was mistaken in saying the band and buckets which came were for turnep seed. We rather guess they were for peas or corn. I must correct therefore my petition for the two larger sizes, and in the uncertainty in which I am, I must rather pray for a...
I inclose you a few seed of the Rutabaga, or Swedish winter turnep. This is the plant which the English government thought of value enough to be procured at public expence from Sweden, cultivated and dispersed. A Mr. Strickland, an English gentleman from Yorkshire, lately here, left a few seeds with me, of which I impart to you. He tells me it has such advantages over the common turnep that it...
We have heard much here of an improvement made in the Scotch threshing machine by Mr. Martin, and that you have seen and approved it. Being myself well acquainted with the original geered machine, and Booker’s substitution of whirls and bands (as I have one of each kind) it will perhaps give you but a little trouble to give me so much of an explanation as will be necessary to make me...
Your favor of Novemb.—did not come to my hands till Dec. 13. It had awaited my arrival here: and the ordinary affairs of business and ceremony prevented my applying to the patent office till Dec. 21. I then paid at the treasury the 20. Doll. bill you inclosed adding 10. Dollars, the price of the drill, as you had mentioned. The petition and description are lodged in the patent office. But a...
I had just recieved from New York the box containing mr Martin’s model of the hand-threshing machine, & the drill, when your favor of Mar. 25. came to hand, and I had nearly compleated a drawing to be filed in the Secretary of state’s office. I suspend further proceeding till I hear from you. in the mean time mr Bingham had communicated to me a model which he had recieved from England. I think...
I now inclose you mr Martin’s patent. a patent had actually been made out on the first description, and how to get this suppressed and another made for a second invention without a second fee was the difficulty. I practised a little art in a case where honesty was really on our side & nothing against us but the rigorous letter of the law, and having obtained the 1st. specification, and got the...
We formerly had a debtor & creditor account of letters on farming; but the high price of tobo. which is likely to continue for some short time, has tempted me to go entirely into that culture and in the mean time my farming schemes are in abeyance, and my farming fields at nurse against the time of my resuming them. but I owe you a political letter. yet the infidelities of the post office and...
Mr. Tazewell died about noon this day after an illness of about 36. hours. on this event, so melancholy for his family & friends, the loss to the public of so faithful and able a servant no reflections can be adequate. The object of this letter (and which I beseech you to mention as from me to no mortal) is the replacement of him by the legislature . many points in Munro’s character would...
Letter not found. Ca. 1 April 1799. Mentioned in John Taylor to Creed Taylor, 10 Apr. 1799 (ViU: Creed Taylor Papers). JM agrees to be a candidate for the Virginia General Assembly. It may have been in this letter that JM requested Taylor to ask Edmund Pendleton to return the letters JM wrote him from Congress (see John Taylor to JM, 4 Mar. 1799 , and n. 1; and Edmund Pendleton to JM, 12 May...
Mr. Wirt, who is of my neighborhood, offers himself a candidate for the clerkship of the H. of Repr. and being known to few of the members, his friends are naturally anxious that what may be said of him with truth should be said. I only fulfill a duty therefore when I bear testimony in this as I would in any other case. he has lived several years my near neighbor, having married the daughter...
Your favor of Dec. 26. has been duly recieved, and was recieved as a proof of your friendly partialities to me of which I have so often had reason to be sensible. my opinion originally was that the President of the US. should have been elected for 7. years, & for ever ineligible afterwards. I have since become sensible that 7. years is too long to be unremoveable, and that there should be a...
I recieved two days ago your letter recommendatory of mr Woodford. I knew his father well and can readily believe that his merits are descended on the son, and especially after what you say of him. if we could always have as good grounds to go upon it would greatly relieve the terrible business of nominations. but lest you should not have attended to it, I have taken up my pen in the moment of...
Your ingenious friend, mr Martin, formerly made for me a drill of very fine construction. I am now very desirous of sending one of them to the Agricultural society of Paris, with whom I am in correspondence, & who are sending me a plough, supposed to be of the best construction ever known. on trial with their best ploughs, by a dynamometer, it is drawn by from one half to 2/3 of the force...
The Agricultural society of Paris has had a plough presented to them which, performing equally good work, requires but one half the force to draw it necessary for what had till then been deemed the best plough in France. in their zeal for improvement they sent one of them to England, and have sent me one, lately arrived at New York, & ordered round to Richmond where it will be open for...
Your favor of the 8th. came to hand only two days ago & I hasten to say I shall be glad to recieve mr Martin’s drill whenever it can be ready. during the present interruption of commerce we send an Aviso every 6. weeks to France & England for the purposes of public & mercantile correspondence, and in any one of these I can send the drill. I have recieved the plough from the Agricultural...