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The army marched yesterday from Morris Town to this place, about eighteen miles from thence, and will proceed towards Peeks-Kill as soon as the weather permits—You will also, at the same time, march through the Clove and cross the River at the most convenient and safe place; for which purpose I would recommend it to you to consult with General Clinton. Our heavy baggage is advancing to fall...
I received your favor of the 11th instant yesterday evening. We have not yet been able to ascertain how far the Count means to extend his co-operations; nor have we learned the event of his visit to the Southward. We expect however very interesting news every day, from this quarter—Till we can know something more definitive respecting his designs, it will be unnecessary to harrass your troops...
I have your two letters of the 2d and 7th Int. now before me. The order communicated by the adjutant General to Col. Jackson was in consequence of my instructions. It is not however my desire to remove the band in case it has been procured at the cost of the officers, and is kept up at their private expence. This is a prerogative I could not think of assuming. But on the other hand, if it...
In consequence of your representation I yesterday detatched Lt Colo. Barber with 150 Men and some Horse to Sommerset Court House. I wish you would use your endeavours to encourage the Militia between Brunswic and the Delaware to be ready to assemble and give their Assistance provided the Enemy attempt to march thro’ the Country, which they intend to do from all our late Accounts. The inclosed...
Your favour of the 17th came to hand an hour and a half ago; and at the same time, that I regret extremely the Count not being arrived, for whose fate, I feel the greatest anxiety, I am happy to learn, that you had been able to extricate yourself from the difficulties you laboured under, and that you had so favourable a prospect before you—I shall wait the issue with the most anxious...
Your favour of Yesterday I have received this morning. As Genl Greene is gone down, with an intention to collect his Division and I dont know what advances he may have made in it, I could not with propriety agree to the change you mention without his approbation; I have wrote to him signifying my assent and desiring him to give you his sentiments upon the occasion. If I have made a mistake in...
I was favoured with yours of the 5th & 6th Instt by Express yesterday evening from Genl Schuyler, and am exceedingly happy on account of the agreable and Interesting Intelligence It contains. Before It came to hand, I almost dreaded to hear from Canada, as my advices seemed to promise nothing favourable, but rather our farther misfortunes—But I am now hopefull that our Affairs from the...
I have both your favs. of this day, by the last of which I find that you had arrived at Fleming town, and am happy to hear that the Militia join you in such Numbers, and are in so good Spirits. I would have you leave your Artillery and Baggage upon some secure and strong Ground under a proper Guard, and move with the remainder of your force to some place between Verbrykes Mill on Neshanack and...
I am honored with your letter of the 15th—I have just received the disagreeable intelligence of the Jersey line having followed the example of the Pensylvanian—This spirit will spread itself through the remainder of the army, if not extinguished by some decisive measure. I shall as quick as possible, at all events, march a detachment to compel the mutineers to submission and I beg leave...
West Point, July 29, 1779. Has referred Sullivan’s complaints against the commissary and quartermaster departments to Major General Nathanael Greene and Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have yours of this Morning with one from Genl Maxwell to Genl Green inclosed. The Weather is still so unfavourable that I have no thoughts of putting the Army in Motion till tomorrow Morning at 4 OClock provided it is fair. Except some very considerable advantage will be gained by your marching this Evening, I would not have you turn out the Men, for without Tents, they, their Arms and...
Since mine to you of yesterday, I wrote to General Clinton giving him some general directions which you will find in the inclosed extract —I, of course, depend on you for giving him more particular ones and am Dr Sir Yr Most Obedt serv. Df , in Alexander Hamilton’s writing, DLC:GW ; Varick transcript , DLC:GW . Hamilton indicated at the bottom of the draft manuscript that this enclosure was...
Notwithstanding the large fleet that sail’d on the 19th and 20th Inst. and the reasons we had to conclude that the regiments were on board, which we had repeatedly heard were embarked—I have just received advices throˆdifferent channels, and which cannot but be certain and authentic that there were none but invalids and the Officers of reduced Corps on board—and that the troops which had...
I was honored with your Excellenceys favor of the 5th Instant yesterday 12 of Clock. also That of the 9th Last night at Eleven. It gives me & the officers here Infinite Satisfaction that your Excellencey has approved our Conduct—I am at a Loss to guess the Designs of the Enemy in this Quarter General Gray with his Fleet are Standing off & on before Bedford Harbor The Day before yesterday a...
It is with no small concern, I am constrained to inform you, that I am constantly receiving Complaints from the People living contiguous to the Road of great abuses committed by the Division under your Command in their march through the Country. From their accounts, they have experienced the most wanton and insufferable injuries—Fences destroyed without the least apparent necessity, and a...
Morristown [ New Jersey ] May 29, 1777. Orders Sullivan to send intelligence concerning the enemy as rapidly as possible. Repeats orders for rerouting men and wagons. States that John Parke Custis is not to come by the usual road. LS , in writing of H, postscript in the writing of George Washington, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress. Custis was Martha Washington’s son by her...
White Plains [ New York ] August 8, 1778 . Asks Sullivan to deliver enclosed letter to D’Estaing. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have just recd intelligence, bearing strong marks of authenticity, that the enemy mean a total evacuation of New York. Various are the conjectures of their destination. I cannot think that they mean to attempt any thing against Boston considering the danger of carrying a heavy Fleet round Cape Cod at this advanced season; but to be prepared at all events, I had, upon the first intimation of...
Your favor of Yesterday has just come to hand. Fusees for the Officers would be proper; but unfortunately there are none here. You will write to the Board of War upon the subject, and mention the number that will be necessary. I have written them a line also upon the occasion; but I am not certain that they will be able to furnish either Fusees or Light Muskets—or Carbines which I have...
I have been duly favored with your letter of the 10th, the contents of which are of so serious a nature, with respect to the Quarter Masters and Commissary’s departments, that I thought it my duty to communicate them to General Greene and Col. Wadsworth —If there has been neglect in either department, the delinquents must be reponsible to the public and these Gentlemen ought to be acquainted...
I this morning received your favor of the 18th Inst. On the 20th I transmitted You, all the intelligence I then had, respecting the movements of the Enemy in New York. I now send you by this conveyance, extracts of two Letters from My Lord Stirling and General Scot, which contain my latest information upon the subject. I have the pleasure to inform you that the taking of Dominica by the french...
If you yet have nothing more than conjecture for the enemy’s descent in Jersey, I beg you will order the 7th Massachusetts Regiment (late Alden’s) immediately to join Pattersons Brigade at this place —And Major Parr to comply strictly with the inclosed order (which issued the 7th instant). They may as the nearest and best way, take the route by Kings-ferry. The baggage of the Regiment may from...
New Windsor [ New York ] January 21, 1781 . Has sent troops to quell the mutiny in New Jersey. Urges that no terms may be made with the mutineers. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
The crowded situation of the Troops in this quarter & the difficulty in procuring forage & other matters induces me to desire you will halt those under your command, in the neighbourhood of Chester where they will be best accommodated. Any distance from 4 to 12 miles above that place towards Sussex Court House will be a convenient position, & answer every purpose in case a co-operation with...
I have just recd advice from Lord Stirling that a fleet of 108 sail left the Hook on the morning of the 3d. There were five or six two Deckers among them. I have not yet learned whether any more were preparing to follow, but as there are persons in New York and upon Staten Island, I expect to be speedily informed of any further movements of the Enemy. I am Dear Sir Yr most obt Servt. P.S....
White Plains [ New York ] August 10, 1778 . Regrets “the tardiness of the militia.” Informs Sullivan of foraging movements of enemy on Long Island. LS , in writing of H, George Washington Photostats, Library of Congress.
I have been favd with yours of the 27th 10 Oclock A. M. Upon opening of it, I was much disappointed at not hearing of the Count D’Estaing’s arrival, who I hope will have made his appearance off the Harbour of Newport before this time, as a Reinforcement passed Maroneck the day before Yesterday Morning. I wish it had been in my power to have spared a larger detatchment of Continental Troops,...
I had the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 30th of August, and congratulate you sincerely on the success of the engagement at Newtown. I immediately transmitted your account to Congress. The advantages we have already gained over the Indians in the destruction of so many of their settlements is very flattering to the expedition. But to make it as conclusive as the state of your...
In answer to yours of this morning, I think it adviseable, that a couple of Officers, one from the New Hampshire and one from the Massachusetts troops should be immediately sent on by different routs, in quest of the Clothing; with directions to proceed on towards fish Kill ’till they meet it. As from other information, besides what you now communicate, I have reason to believe there is a...
The Intention of yesterday’s order, respecting the Review of the Connecticut Troops, is only to afford a good oppertunity of making choice of such of their Arms as shall be found fit for the use of the New Army. I am not without my fear that if they are appriz’d of the Intention, some of the best Arms will be Secreted; for this reason I desire you will say nothing of the matter till the...
Smiths Clove [ New York ] June 11, 1779 . Orders Sullivan to give Brigadier General James Clinton detailed instructions for western expedition. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
West Point, August 1, 1779. Describes raid by Joseph Brant and a party of Indians. Informs Sullivan of American attack on Stony Point. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
[ White Plains, New York ] August 19, 1778 . Introduces the Chevalier de la Neuville who wishes to serve with Sullivan in proposed expedition. Has been serving as inspector general with northern army. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress. Louis Pierre Penot Lombard, Chevalier de la Neuville .
I had the pleasure of your letter of the 3d Inst. with its inclosure. In a letter from Gen. Gates of yesterdays date he has the following paragraph. “Two sailors belonging to Cape Cod who made their escape from the prison ship last monday night arrived here; they declare, that the British fleet of men of war, sailed ten days ago in quest of the french fleet.” There is some shew of a...
I have received your two favours both of the 24th informing me of the particulars of an expedition you have lately made to Staten Island. It is unfortunate that an affair which had so prosperous a beginning should have terminated so disagreeably, as in a great measure to defeat the good consequences that might have attended it. I am however glad to hear that the officers and men distinguished...
[ Whitpain Township, Pennsylvania ] October 24, 1777 . Answers questions concerning Sullivan’s conduct at Brandywine. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I received last night your favour of the 26th and am happy to hear that your main difficulty on the score of waggons is in the way of being removed. Besides the reason assigned for the caution contained in mine of the 24th—another not less powerful is that our supplies are very unequal to the general wants of the army and that without the greatest oelig;conomy in proportioning our...
From an account I have just received I hope this will meet you on your route from Tioga. It is intended to quicken your march that you may with all possible dispatch form a junction with this army. You will feel the importance of this when I tell you that it is probable we shall shortly have a cooperation with his Excellency Count D’Estaing, which from the enemy’s numbers in New York will...
I am favd with yours of the 5th and 6th I hope the loss of the enemy mentioned in the former may prove true. I cannot at present account for the intent of the landing at Bedford, if they mean to act seriously to the Eastward, I think it will occasion a removal of their whole force from New York. Many accounts from thence say that an evacuation is intended, but I cannot learn that they have yet...
I received your favour of this date. It is of the greatest moment that the motions of the enemy on the quarter you mention, should be narrowly watched; and every step they take known by me as early as possible. I am strongly apprehensive they will shortly push for Philadelphia by water, and the counteracting their scheme will intirely depend upon my having instant intelligence of every thing...
Middlebrook [ New Jersey ] May 24, 1779 . Describes steps taken to furnish Sullivan’s troops with shoes, overalls, and hunting shirts. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I have received your favor of this morning containing an extract of a Letter written by Colonel Ramsey on behalf of the Field Officers at Wilmington—their Apology Sir is sufficient to do away every thing disagreeable that has past on the subject, and to induce me to attribute their incautious expressions to the causes which they mention. You will communicate this to the Gentlemen by the first...
On Thursday I received your favor of the 10th Instant, advising of your descent on Rhode-Island—of the arrival of the British fleet & of Count D’Estaing’s pursuing them. Since this I have not had a single tittle of intelligence on the subject of your operations—and of course I have been in a disagreable state of suspence and anxiety. I must earnestly request that you will be more frequent in...
I am to acknowledge the recet of your favor of the 16 November with its inclosures which were forwarded agreably to your Desire to New York. I am much obliged to you for your wishes for my Welfare and beg you to believe that I am &c. DLC : Papers of George Washington.
From every information lately received, there is reason to believe the Enemy are evacuating Brunswick by sending One Brigade after Another. It is said they are transporting their baggage both by Land & Water to Amboy with the greatest Industry. If this fact be true, I should suppose it highly expedient that you should detach a Number of Militia well acquainted with the Country South of Amboy,...
Congress having determined upon an Expedition of an extensive nature agt the hostile tribes of the Indians of the six Nations, the command is offered to Majr General Gates as senior Officer, but should he decline, it is my wish it should devolve upon you—That no time may be lost by General Gates’s non-acceptance, I have put this letter under cover to him, and have desired him to forward it to...
I was yesterday favd with yours of the 15th instant from Tioga, and congratulate you upon your success against Chemung and Scheshequenung. This stroke, I hope, will put your junction with General Clinton out of all hazard, after which, I think you have little to fear. I have the pleasure to inform you, that in the night of the 18th instant, Major Lee of the Dragoons, with a detachment from the...
I recd yours of the 29th at this place, to which I have removed for the convenience of gaining intelligence of the Motions of the Enemy who are out in considerable force on this side of Kingsbridge, and in Bergen County in Jersey. They seem to be foraging, in which they are busily employed. A few nights ago the party in Jersey made an unlucky stroke at Colo. Baylors Regt of Horse laying at...
On receipt of your letter of the 21st I wrote to the Board of War urging them immediate⟨ly⟩ to send forward the shoes which they had promised to collect for the supply of your troops amounting to about 4500 and 2000 ⅌ of Overalls. The former was to have been collected at Lancaster and is directed to be forwarded to Sunbury—the latter will go to Easton—I have requested them to send as many more...
In my letter of yesterday I gave you my latest information. I have now to advise you that the fleet left Sandy Hook the 19th and 20th Inst. The first division consisted of above 120 vessels, of which 15 were of the line, and 10 or 12 frigates. The second division about 30 sail of which two were of 50 guns and two frigates. They all stood Eastward—Whether the remaining ships and troops are to...