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we were made very happy this morning by the receipt of your Letter, informing us of the arrival of my Parents— be pleased to accept our sincere thanks for this early Proof of your attention— I am anxious to hear particularly respecting their Healths— I hope the Lameness of my Mammas Hand which you mention, is not to be of long continueance— I hope you will excuse the Liberty I have taken of...
Give me leave to congratulate you & mrs Smith upon the Birth of a Daughter. I hope both the Mamma and Infant are in good Health, as well as master William my Grandchildren are much afflicted with the Hooping cough we have had a succession of extreem Hot weather, and tho we have one of the most airy situations near the city, I have sufferd much from the Heat. It would make us very happy to see...
The Death of my Mother which took place this afternoon very suddenly, will prevent my Sitting out on my journey as I had intended on twesday. we propose to burry her on Monday. I do not think I can get away untill thursday. I shall therefore omit sending Beckey untill fryday. I would wish two places engaged in the Stage as I have an other Girl to go with her, and should like to have them under...
Will you be kind as to see mr Frothingham and tell him that I wish him to have the Coachee cased, and put on Board the first vessel which sails for this place agreeing for the freight of it, before he puts it on Board I have a Leeding Brass Harniss at Quincy which I will write to have sent to mr Frothingham that the whole may come together. Dr Welch has in his Hands three hundred Dollors which...
Mr otis will tell you all the News in this quarter of the Earth, where Wickedness abounds of all kinds. I hope however there may be found Rightous sufficient to save the city. we have a senator—you see by his Letter what he is capable of. the Government is not found sufficently strong to punish him according to his Demerrits, or he would not have been permitted to have escaped, nor do I think...
We are thus far on our Way to N England if no accident happens to prevent us. I hope on thursday of next week to sleep at williams at Malbourough, and to dine at Watertown on fryday. We escaped from N york with less parade than was intended, tho we were not less sensible to the politeness and civility of the inhabitants who were disposed to do us every honour both civil and Military. the first...
As you was absent when I left home I was unable to pay you for some articles which you had purchased for me, as well as some which mrs smith had procured for me. if you will be so good as to forward me the amount, I will transmit it to you— When I pay’d mr Fothingham for the Carriage, there were the quarter Lights and some other matters which made the carriage amount to more than our first...
I wrote you from East Chester and inclosed you 90 dollors to pay a Note in mr Frothinghams hands. I have not received a line in acknowledgment of the letter, which makes me a little anxious for its fate. you was so good as to Say you would send me Some salt fish. I should like a couple of kental to treat our good Massachusetts Friends. I will thank you to send it by one of the first vessels,...
I received your obliging favour of Nov br 8 th the day after I last wrote you. I inclose the amount of your account with many thanks for your kindness— The Betsy is arrived with the fish, and if my cook can be taught to dress it, some of our Nothern Friends shall Toast your Health. The state of N Jersey as you observe, most certainly manifested a very marked respect and approbation of the...
I received your Letter of Jan’ ry and observed Your communication, somewhat alterd to better suit the Times. I though the alteration not amiss. the paper you inclosed to me I put into the Hands of the President. he could not apply the Character as he did not recollect that any such person had applied. I had an opportunity of shewing it to the secretary at War. he was at no loss, and mentiond a...
We now have the appearence of some fine weather our Rivers are open, but our Roads are all like what we experienced when we came through the Jersis in April last. I begin to look towards my Native state with a wish to be early there, which I fear will not be seconded by Congress, for tho many of them are distresst at the manner this session has heitherto been wasted, yet they cannot controul...
The President received your Letter this morning dated 5 Feb’ry. the Rule of the former President not to answer Letters of this nature, he has abided by. his Rule is to place all Canditates for office upon a Book kept for that purpose, and to appoint to office such persons as come best recommended for abilities integrity and industery. in your case he would be particuliarly delicate, for as he...
I received your kind favour of Feb ry 25 this morning. the badness of the roads I suppose was the reason it did not reach me sooner. The Maderia I do not want to be sent here. it is for Home consumption I have no occasion for it here. there are some other articles I should wish you to secure for me immediatly half Hundred Coffe and a Hunderd & half Brown sugar; which will immediaty rise, for I...
I yesterday received your Letter of March 11 th it would give the President great satisfaction to communicate to the publick the dispatches of our Envoys if he could do it consistant with their safety and Security. the Portugeze minister is imprisoned now in France. we have not Certainty that ours have left Paris—and so critical are the times, that our Ministers cannot communicate...
I fully unite with you in sentiment, that much ill Blood and warmth of Passion is excited by Town meeting Government. the Merchants who are most interested ought to be left free to Arm or not as they please. You cannot conceive what Mischief will result to our Country from the inteference of People, who can have only a partial view of subjects of this nature; I will tell you Sir, that the...
I inclose a Letter to you for Mrs Black. as there is but one post a week for Quincy, it may probably lay in the office Some days, and it is of conquence that she should have it immediatly as it respects an orphan Baby which I have under my care here. you will be so kind if mr Black should not be in Town when you receive it to send it to mr Lambs with a request to them to send it to Quincy...
I have rec’d your’s of the 13 th and 16 th: the last contains the most agreeable News I have heard a long time.— If M rs: Adams should arrive, I believe it will be the most prudent thing she can do, to purchase as strong and decent a Coach of four Places, as can be had for 150 Guineas, in this she may come to the Hague, and go in it with me to Paris if I should have occasion to go there—I...
I have received your obliging Letter of the 19th. A drawback on Rum exported is admitted by the House, and I believe will not be taken off by the Senate. The duty on Molalses will be reduced to 4 Cents and I hope to three. Your Reasoning appears to be very just and I think will prevail. The jealousies Distilleries and Breweries are natural and cannot be wholly prevented: but I hope they will...
Your agreable favour of the 24th of April, was brought to me in season and I thank you for it; though my thanks are not in good season.—Your sentiments concerning the assumption of the State debts, the encouragement of American navigation and the establishment of a national bank, are conformable to those of about one half The Continent and contrary to those of the other half. How shall we...
The President of the United States, requests the Pleasure of Mr. Smith’s Company to Dine, on thursday next, at ½ past 2 o’clock. An answer is requested. MHi : Adams Papers.
Your last Letter both allarmd my fears, and in some measure prepared my mind for the Event which has since taken place, and which I read this day in the Centinal. dear little Cherub. she is early calld to a state of Bliss. endeared to me, by having past more of her time with me, than either of the other Children, I the more sensibly feel your loss, and shed with you the sympathizing tear. With...
I received by way of Providence last week your kind Letter of the 11th sent by mrs. Barret, together with the Sermon for which accept my thanks. if mr and mrs Barret had come to Philadelphia, it would have given me pleasure to have noticed them, as it does all of my Friends & acquaintance, or those who are introduced to me by others. I take this opportunity by mr Spear to send you two or three...
yours of May 18 received on Saturday. the President Says, he will be obliged to you to chuse him a good pipe of wine and inform dr Tufts who will take measures to get it to Quincy. You may either forward the Bill of it here, or the person of whom you purchase may wait our comeing, which I hope will be in about a month from this time, I fear not Sooner—we know not what a day may bring forth—You...
I received your Letter yesterday of May the 28th, and the Sermons you were so kind as to send me, which I have read with much pleasure. I have received ten from different Gentlemen and I design to have them bound up in a vol’m—You observe that a uninimity prevails throughout the Country. It does so in a wonderfull degree, and I consider it as a kind interposition of providence in our favour,...
I write you a line this morning to say that dispatches have arrived from our envoys up to April as I understand. I have not seen them. They are just decypherd and will be communicated. No reception of them by the directory. Some conferences with Tallyrand, the Subject as I learn, money. money still—why will our envoys listen to such tales? they will delay & delay, untill the concequences will...
I inclose you a Bill of Lading of some flower, a cask, trunk and an Iron dripping pan, which I have look’d for without effect in Boston. You will be so good as to receive them for me, & pay the freight, which with other matters you have against me. You will charge and I will pay You in Boston, or send you from hence if You will inclose the account; Heigh ho. When Congress will rise, I can make...
The enclosed letter is from Count Neale a respectable nobleman attached to this Court, to a commercial house at Boston, which he has requested me to forward, and as I have no personal acquaintance with those Gentlemen, I have thought it safer to send it under cover to you.—It is left open, because the Count desires you to read it, and if the proposals relative to the purchase of the articles...
I received yours of the 11th. I think Thomas Welch should take his degree at College before he goes. I hope to be in Boston in July. If any vessel should be going to Hamburgh, it would be best for him to embark for that port. I sincerely regret that you have had an other vessel captured. Captain Brooks is destined to it, it should seem, from his having so often sufferd, but the President says...
Since writing to you, respecting Thomas Welch, I have received last week a Letter from mr Adams which wholy discourages me from Sending any person abroad. he states certain difficulties which I do not See they can be Surmounted, certainly not, as it respects Thomas I cannot but regreet that I did not receive the Letter which is dated the last of Feb’ry Sooner, that I might not have proposed...
I have this moment received your Letter of June 25th, I wrote to you by the post of tuesday, and told you that from a Letter received from mr Adams I thought it would be impractable for Thomas Welch to go out. I now inclose you the Letter and you must judge what is best to be done. mr Adams will undoubtedly give Thomas his Board if he goes but you see the expences of his going to him and of...
I have received your two kind favours this week of June 29 & July 2d as Hot a day as I ever experienced. I was therefore upon that and the succeeding day unfit for any exertion, and thought it would be impossible for me to go through the fatigues of the 4th without a Change of weather which fortunately took place on twesday afternoon. otherways it must have proved fatal to the Young troops,...
I received your Letter with mr Quincys oration which justly merrits all the praise bestowed upon it. I write you a line this morning to inform you that I Shall get Letters ready to send on to Thomas welch if he should go before I arrive, I hope the Senate will be up in a day or two, as the Secretary of War arrived here this morning and brings Gen’ll Washingtons acceptance of the appointment....
I have coverd to you the dispatches which are for Thomas Welch to take with him. I hope in the course of the present week to set out for Quincy, but cannot depend upon any thing, as we know not what a day will bring forth, and it is high time something of concequence should reach us. You will see the appointments for the Staff of the Army and will hear of a Negative I doubt not. When the...
I Love, I esteem I venerate her memory, as I did her Character while living. as She always treated me like a Child, I have every reason to Cherish her memory I never knew a purer Character, or a more strictly pious one. from years of intimacy with her, I can truly Say, that I have seen her greived, but never angry—never passionate never off her Gaurd—always disposed to think of others in the...
I think I do not hear from you So often as when I was in Philadelphia. I hope mrs Smith and you did not take a Surfeit of Quincy during your residence here—the travelling has not been Such as to tempt any one out for pleasure. the Snow has so bankd the roads this way and in many places it is bare Ground, that I fear we Shall not have good Roads this winter. if the Roads had been good I believe...
I could not sleep last night. I read in the Mercury that Captain Jenkins in the America arrived at Newbury port last Sunday. you will say I ought to have slept the better to think that he was out of danger. So I should, perhaps if I could have been certain that Thomas was arrived with him in good Health. His last Letter dated the 19 of october, informd us that he had taken his passage on Board...
I inclose you the Letter which gave me every reason to expect that Thomas was on Board Capt Jenkins. as he is not mentiond, and I have not heard any thing, I am fearfull he did not come. Perhaps capt Jenkins may know in what vessel he took his passage. It is very painfull to be daily expecting a Friend at this Season of the year. one cannot help having much anxiety. The conduct of Dr W——h is...
Mr Brooks calld and left the Letter from you and mr Adams’s papers from dr Welch excepting Receits of which there are none, but dr Tufts will now attend to his affairs and pay the assesments as soon as he can come to Town. I cannot rest through the day, without Sending to know if you can give me any information, respecting Thomas. mr Brooks informed me last Evening that the Barbara was cast...
Mr Adams has some property in his Brother Charles’s Hands at N York. he wrote me in one of his late Letters that he Should direct dr Welch to draw for it and purchase him a free hold estate in Boston. whether he has given him power so to do I know not. I have written to Charles for information and desired him not to let it go if he could avoid it untill he received his Brother’s orders again....
I received by mr Brooks the Sermon you was so good as to Send me; and have ha read it with much pleasure. the writer bids fair to make a Shining light. I most Sincerely hope you may have your loss made up to you by the Setlement of an amiable, able and sensible pastor; I thank you for the intelligence you procured respecting my son. he thought he was acting for the best, I doubt not, but as...
I thank you for the entertainment afforded me by the Stranger, and I most Sincerely Congratulate you, and mrs Smith upon the Birth of a daughter. may her Life be preserved, and with the rest of your amiable little ones, prove a blessings to you. I trouble you again, my dear Sir with a Bill of lading, and inclose the money for the freight of the articles, and Brislers Letter, by which you will...
I Send James this morning, and wish you had better weather to come upon. if you will Send Eliza to me, I will take the best care I can of her. She had better Stay with me untill you get setled in your House I Shall not dine till near two oclock, and Shall be glad to See as many of your Family here, as you can get into the carriage. I have Seen & talked with mr Bass, and think you may have him...
I have been from Quincy more than five weeks, and have received only one Letter from any Friend Since I left them; I find however that you have not been unmindfull of us. the fish arrived Safe and we regaled ourself with it, mr and mr. otis joining in the commemoration of the good things of New England Poultry we have here, both cheeper and in better order than our markets produce it, but the...
Least you Should not See many of the curiosities produced in the Aurora; I Shall now and then inclose you a choice morsal; in this, which I now forward you you will find a Letter Said to have been written by a mr Crammond of this City, to mr Parish the former Consul at Hamburgh and printed in a Paris paper. mr Crammond is a respectable English merchant of this City, but by no means a...
The paper which I inclose to you, will Shew you at one view the measures which have been adopted as tributes of gratefull Remembrance to the Remains of “the Man who united all Hearts,” and whose Death a whole Nation mourn’s—When the heavy tydings reach the inhabitants of our State, I am Sure they will not be wanting in testimonies of Regret and Respect; As Congress have requested the president...
I wrote you this week, but not hearing from you, as the Letter went by a transient person I fear you did not get it. I wisht to know what day this week you proposed to come up, as I would send in James with the carriage to bring up your young family. I can also accommodate you with two Beds, so that you need not be anxious about sleeping in your House untill it is quite in order. I have half a...
I received your Letter by mr Sheafe together with the Small trunk Safe, and render many thanks to you and mrs Smith for your kind attention. this morning I received your favour of Janry the 9th, with the papers inclosed manifesting every testimony of Respect and gratefull Remembrance which an affectionate people can pay to the memory of a public Benefactor. my Native State has never been...
Several of your favours have come Safe to hand for which I thank you—in your last you mention it probable that mr Strong will be Voted for as Govenour—a very good Man, Who will be acceptable to every good man not devoted to Party. but to enable a Man who has not a fortune to Spend in the public service, and who has a large and increasing family to provide for, it will be necessary to enlarge...
I received on Saturday your kind favour of Febry. accept my thanks for the orations. I send you in return Major Jacksons, which was very handsomely deliverd, and is as highly spoken of as any amongst the multitude. I think it will not lose by a comparison with any which I have read, and I already have enough for a volm. Messengers is the wildest Raphosody of any I do not esteem the whole; more...
I could not but regreet that we had not the pleasure of Seeing you in Philadelphia, as you got so near. But we could not prevail upon mrs Smith to Stay any longer. I hope to have the Satisfaction of Seeing you Soon at Quincy. I shall leave here on monday. the President will Sit out next week for Washington. I have to trouble you again with an other Bill of Laden. the chairs mentiond in it be...